Getting electrocuted in bathtub

In the old days when plumbing was made of metal, people were electrocuted in bathtubs if an electric appliance such as a hair dryer or plug in radio fell into the tub while a person was in it.
However, modern tubs and the pipes connected to them are plastic. Thus not grounded. Is it still possible to get electrocuted in an ungrounded bathtub, if an appliance falls in the water?
Also, I remember being told to never take a bath when it's lightning outside. Is that still valid today in a plastic plumbing system?
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Appliance comes in contact with water. What's in the pipes ?
Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@nomail.com says...

Errm, why do you want to know?...
Mike.
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says...

Just an appliance in the water is not going to make a path through the body in either tub.
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snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org says...

Uhh, I wouldn't bet my life on that by trying...Pure water is a lousy conductor, but, most people's water has minerals in it; which makes a pretty good conductor. Doesn't matter if your house is using plastic pipes, at some point, that water supply is going back to a metal line which is going to provide a nice path to ground. If you're in the tub, you're in the way, part of the circuit, not good to be you.
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says...

Uhh... You a basic electronics guy, eh?

We do not need a primer on water conductivity in an electronics newsgroup. Pretty much common sense around here. The question was about a tub. We ALL already know that it is assumed that the water conducts. There is very little pure water around to fill bathtubs with.

The tub of water is NOT connected to "the water supply" once the tub is filled. You have logic flaws in your argument.

OK, so I thought you were a basic electronics guy, but you even fail on that.
You have to get the current path logic right, before you can start arguing about folks being part of a circuit. Your argument is flawed.
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nG1 Sun, 10 Nov 2019 08:51:19 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

Wrong video... Oops...
Here's one of two I intended to provide you:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHGo-52wCDc

and here's the other one...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v
rY59nGxBg
--
Look! He's protecting himself with a zesty tartar sauce.

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On Wednesday, November 6, 2019 at 2:18:38 AM UTC-6, Gz wrote:

Ordinary tap water is a conductor so the plastic pipes are not relevant.
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On Wednesday, November 6, 2019 at 3:18:38 AM UTC-5, Gz wrote:

It's not true that all or probably even most fresh water pipes are plastic today. Even in new construction I see copper used here. If it is plastic it would lessen the chance of getting shocked. Same thing for lightning.
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On 11/6/2019 1:14 AM, Unlisted wrote:

Lightning travels 10 miles across the open sky and strikes your tubafor house. Do you think some wet plastic plumbing will save your ass?
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On 11/6/2019 7:03 AM, duh wrote:

Some farmers think the tires on their tractor provides protection. Loose some farmers that way.
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On 06/11/2019 13:18, John S wrote:

That said being inside a car is a fair bit safer than standing outside. The metal Faraday cage isn't perfect but it is better than nothing.
A building I worked in took a direct lightning hit on one apex. The strike ran down the telephone cables to the main switchboard instantly vapourising them to a black mess. The switchboard girl was inconsolable and temporarily deaf. The other resulting damage was most peculiar.
Surge arresters supposed to protect computer terminal lines saved themselves by allowing more expensive IO boards to fry in the mainframe. They had to be replaced as a precaution anyway. Terminals all survived. Murphy's law that only the most expensive bits took damage.
It was more than a bit annoying that the strike hit us and not the much higher supergrid pylon just 30m away.
In another incident I narrowly missed seeing ball lightning during a particularly violent summer thunderstorm. Physicist friends did see it.
People are hit by lightning and some do survive. They have interesting Lichenberg figure skin burn pattern marks from the discharge.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lichtenberg_figure
https://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/what-does-it-look-when-person-gets-struck-lightning/
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Getting hit by lightning is most likely to happen in Florida and the person is usually holding a golf club. One rule I have heard is always carry a one iron because not even God can hit a one iron.
Seriously, there is such a thing as lightning protection but it is far more than one surge protector or just having plastic pipes.
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How many farmers have been 'loosed' 'that way'?
I think it is far fewer than you would like folks to believe.
And it is miles, but it ain't ten miles.
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On 11/6/19 7:18 AM, John S wrote:

The vast majority of tractors have cabs nowadays so the operators are protected. Most of the time they are pulling an implement in the ground which should provide a good path for the lightning. I've been on or around farms all of my life. I don't recall anyone getting killed by lightning while driving a tractor. My parents did get a shock while unloading irrigation pipe. Hardly any clouds but there was a lightning shot. My dad's hair stood up for awhile afterward. I know of more guys being killed in grain bins or by rollover than lightning.
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There is a big difference between lightning and a breaker protected residential service branch.
The lightning travels across miles because it is at millions of volts potential.
Residential service voltages will not even travel trough a bread bag, much less your PVC plumbing.
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snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org Wed, 06 Nov 2019 23:23:10 GMT in alt.home.repair, wrote:

It's not just voltage, it's amperage. It's got kick behind it too.

That's not necessarily true...
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You ain't real bright. If it builds enough to reach the ground due to having the voltage to breach the gap, the ensuing connection will have high current for the moment of the event. Current does not flow at all until the event, so it is voltage that is required to do the job. The current is just the result of the job being done.
So, it is JUST THE VOLTAGE.

Bullshit. A bread bag has the strength to withstand household voltages. Period. PVC has even greater withstand capacity. So you also do not know much about polymers, films, or dielectric strength either.
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snipped-for-privacy@decadence.org Wed, 06 Nov 2019 23:23:10 GMT in

connection will have high current for the moment of the event.
Not necessarily. You can have whats known as a 'cold' arc, too. It has very little current behind it, it's so weak infact it can't even ignite fuel vapor. A battery powered bug zapper circuit, aka, a juul thief can generate a tiny arc; it's not enough to bring you any serious harm and won't even light a piece of paper if you tried.

No, it isn't. How much experience do you actually have with HV?
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Yes, it very much so is, wire boy.

I have HV supplies at LANL and that went up on space shuttle missions. So, very likely more than you have, since you likely do not even know what LANL is, much less anything about space bound electronic packages. I know more about arcing than you do... obviously.

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