Ground outdoor outlet?

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Like Joseph and others said......the newly installed outlet MUST BE grounded.........it's an outdoor outlet and must be grounded per NEC Section 382.
The NEC permission to replace _existing_ 2 wire outlets that are not grounded with a 3 wire GFCI outlet should not be confused with the requirements for nonmetallic extensions (NEC 382) in this case. NEC Article 382 specifically does NOT permit nonmetallic extensions to be made to outdoor outlets.
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Thanks. My code book NEC 1999 does not have the article 382. Is this new in the 2002 code? It is important to note that your local area may not require the latest code. A city where I used to live only recently adopted 1999 codes.The city where I live now is still using the NEC 1984 code and similar vintage for building and plumbing codes. It doesn't hurt to use the latest code though. Kevin
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snipped-for-privacy@mailblocks.com says...

Sorry about the incorrect information on the GFI needing a ground to function. Outdoor outlets are much safer if they are grounded as much equipment that is connected to these outlets normally uses the third ground conductor for your protection. It is possible that your existing outlets are grounded if the wires are run through metal conduit and the outlets mounted in metal outlet boxes. If not then you most certainly have no ground and the best solution would be to run a new wire back to the breaker box.
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The NEC allows grounding to any verified ground source when retrofitting two-wire systems. That's not to say that it's a good idea, but it's better than nothing. Best to pull a wire back to the service ground. There's also a rule about the type of enclosure for outside outlets. They must be completely covered...even in use. The old style plug covers, which covered the outlet only when unused, are no longer acceptable. The new ones have a large shield or door which covers the entire shebang, with slots underneath to allow passage of cables.
The old ones would allow water to wick up--or dribble into--the outlet itself when a cord was plugged in...only protected well when unused.
jak
says...

an
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On Sat, 23 Aug 2003 14:37:20 -0700, Ralph Farr wrote

No worries, Mate!

It turns out that the rooms where I was adding the outdoor outlet did have a 3-wire circuit. This extension of the house is newer than the original house, which has only 2-wire circuits.
So, the ground issue is a non-issue.
But I learned much about GFCI and grounding requirements thanks to all who contributed here.
Thanks! Dave C
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On Sat, 23 Aug 2003 21:27:17 -0700, DaveC

I'd recommend retrofitting GFCI outlets at the beginning of all of your outlet circuits, grounded or not. The only exception would be for circuits where a nuisance trip might drop power to a fridge.
A GFCI saved my butt. I had reached behind the fridge to shoo our pet rabbit out and hit the power cord she'd been chewing. I was standing on concrete barefoot. Everything went black for a split second and I heard the GFCI pop on the other side of the room. My arm was aching for about an hour.
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