Trees and common problems

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Don Staples you say wood is dead. Is your car dead? If I see you in a accident I will let you burn because you are dead. Or so you claim.
You are so ignorant - lacking knowledge. Go help bush with his tree problems. His ranch needs salvaged. Go help him out.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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Just to make it a bit clearer, I live southwest of Austin, TX in hill country proper. The predominant, native tree here that grows naturally is the live oak.
Weather conditions for the past 3 years has been one year of severe drought, one year of more than ample rain rivaling rain normally seen in much wetter areas of the country, this year in extreme drought with almost a month of 100F temps so far. Unusual for even this part of the country that early in the year. The TV weatherman, says on a regular basis, the culprit is "blocking high" preventing the normal influx of Gulf moisture from intruding and creating the typical cloudcover, and potential for rain. The cloudcover allows slightly less temps, and moisture from the Gulf does similar and slowsdown dryout of native surface vegetation. East Texas isn't suffering though as the high has been primarily too far west.
Similarly, I may call the live oak an "evergreen" myself as it only lacks leaves for a week or 2 in early spring. Guess I could call it an almost always evergreen. I know its not a genuine evergreen in the strictest sense as I'm sure my neighbor does as well.
All my live oaks are native, no home growns/transplants from pots.
Clarifying what I was asking originally, will there be any apparent, visible signs of drought stress on these live oaks? Insects and fungi aren't a problem now due to lack of water. I'm concerned about my only water source, a water well. So, I've stopped watering the lawn. Typically, a summer in this region is totally lacking in any appreciable rain, if any. So, thus my question.
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Dave
"symplastless" < snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net> wrote in message
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On Fri, 27 Jun 2008 10:44:00 -0500, "Dioclese" <NONE> wrote:

It depends on many things. I have very deep soil before you hit caliche. Do you know how deep your soil is? I don't waste water on turf, but i do water my Live Oaks about twice a month. I use one of those really cheap yellow ring sprinklers and move it all around under the trees out to the drip line and a bit beyond. I set the timer on the stove to remind me to move it. This type of sprinkler has large drops of water so it doesn't evaporate in the air before it hits the ground. It' takes several hours to water three trees in the front. My trees are numbered and registererd at historic and climax. They are all many hundreds of years old.
A sign a Live Oak is in distress is a compensatory growth which looks like the foliage is coming out all along the limbs and branches, not in an arranged canopy. If I get a chance I will post a photo from a neighbor who did damage to their trees and how the tree is holding on for dear life.
So, the answer is yes, you should water your trees two inches a month in summer, at least. These trees have been on this land for hundreds of years and I'm certain the old homestead never watered them. East Texas is considered part of the humid south. Austin is considered on the dry line, thus the variation in climate county to county.
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Hill (HILL) country here, not in the bottom land near seasonal creek or river. Soil, if you want to call it that, is from zero to maybe 2" in the area around my home natively. I've added topsoil around the house. Caliche is widely available at surface in many areas. More likely, here, will run into fractured limestone. In fact, there is some surface limestone in the yard.

Yes, I saw that 3 years ago on a group of live oaks that were in distress for many reasons. Spent alot of time examining them as they serve as western side shade for the house. Other than excessive carpenter ants, more spanish moss than leaf cover, lots of dead small branches, I saw leaves sprouting in the middle of branches that should not be leafing.
Since I finished the house shortly afterwards, found my well water was high in hydrogen sulfide gas. (not sulfide solids). The fix was an aeration bottle. The bottle flushes every night to a french drain not far and uphill from this group of trees. About 30 gallons per flush. Apparently, the group of oaks is getting some of this water by appearances.
I don't know what the vast majority of live oaks in the hill country use for soil as its mostly fractured limestone and caliche at or near the surface.

Climatology seems to be indicating the west Texas desert may be moving east. I live in west Hays county.
--
Dave

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On Sat, 28 Jun 2008 07:18:03 -0500, "Dioclese" <NONE> wrote:


I could be wrong, but it seems the jet stream is moving north, disalowing (is that a word?) the Gulf stream to have proper conditions to form storm clouds. I would say this is a sign of global warming, but I am not sure of that. Not because I don't believe in global warming, rather it's my lack of knowledge on the subject. I very much believe in global warming.
Trees in the Hill Country depend on underground seeps. There seems to be many of them all around. Live Oaks also are native to the area and how they survive the caliche is that they've adapted to very high pH levels with few elements in th top horizon. Sometimes if you dig deeper into the caliche there will be a sub-soil layer which will have clay and retention of both water and elements to nourish the trees.
v
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Believe its "disallowing".
The TV weatherman uses the term "dry line", not as a form of topography, rather, the area of air encountered by a cool/cold front lacking any appreciable moisture.
From what I gather, on the western side of the U.S., the jet stream has moved north. The jet stream influences creation of upper level high pressure systems. These, in turn, affect surface level weather. The blocking high pressure system I was talking about and preventing rain in my area, was for the May/early June time period. Generally, that period in late spring is when most of the local rain occurs. The last occurrence caused a rain system to split in 2, one went due south, and the other east. The southbound was influenced directly by the western high pressure system wind flow, the easternbound was its original direction of travel.
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Dave

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Yeah, right. Check the cambial electrical resistance to find out the vitality of the tree.
Hire someone one that understands trees.
I did the work at Tulane university in New O. I would have no trouble finding a mean for a healthy live oak. What is your problem? Confused?
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John A. Keslick, Jr.
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On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 20:33:51 -0400, "symplastless"

I don't have any trouble with my trees. What's the prob?
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"Dioclese" <NONE> wrote in message

Use a SHIGOMETER!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Its reveals the trees vitality. The problem with your local forester Don Staples is that he does not understand trees enough to use one. I would move from Texas. Wound dressing, really! http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/S/shigometry.html The meter will tell you what you are asking if you have the knowledge and experience to use it. I do or I am qualified.
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John A. Keslick, Jr.
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On Sun, 29 Jun 2008 20:30:03 -0400, "symplastless"

There is hope in the world.
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wrote:

No, the hope is the dumbass will never move to Texas.
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