Not looking good for the Bosch Reaxx TS



I sure like my Infiniti M37. 330hp is pretty sweet :-) I've had Nissan cars since 1983 (810 Datsun Maxima, I30 and M37) all of which have held up very well with zero problems.
I really loved my 2000 base-model Ford Ranger; I gave it to my nephew last year and got a Chevy Colorado, which I don't love much at all - the programmers at Chevy are incompetent.
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

190 hp has served me well enough... : )

Wow, that's interesting. I saw the Colorado caught my eye, appearing on a "good value" list. I hate to ask you to think about it, but, for the sake of all who are interested, what bugs you about it?
Bill
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Oh, it's all little things. From the comfort standpoint, the Colorado is a step up from the base-model Ranger that I had. I was looking for a domestic manual transmission and the Colorado was the -only- option at the time (although Chevy didn't offer a regular cab, mine was as base-model is it was possible to get).
On the down side, the gearing ratios aren't designed for people who use engine braking (second is too close to first and too far from third - which is probably for those who like to start out in second). The radio display/backup camera screen is too small. There is a very annoying two-second delay between turning the volume knob and detecting a change in the sound level. The daylight sensor that switches the screen brightness is horrible - passing through the shadow of an overpass will dim the screen to unreadability. The entertainment system infrequently resets for no apparent reason. The UI is poor.
I had a regular cab on the Ranger, but the colorado has an extended cab and the back end sits much higher than the front, which makes rear visibility poor (when compared with the excellent visibility in the ranger).
There were two recalls in the first eight months I had it (shifter lever and hood latch). I'm not particularly happy with the dealership either, they had to keep my truck for 24-hours to change the oil and do the recalls (and they didn't do the hood-latch one because they didn't have the part in stock). On the otherhand, they'll do two oil changes for free during the first two years.
Just can't compare with my memories of the 1963 Impala with the 350 four-barrel.
I hear ford is bringing the ranger back, may have to look into it.
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Scott Lurndal wrote:

You motivated me to read about the "2019 Ranger" at Car and Driver. What I found most interesting was the comments people posted. I found it insightful to read about what people are looking for versus what is available.
Cheers, Bill
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wrote:

It's going to be interesting to see how popular the new Ranger really is. FWIG, the Ranger was discontinued because they were almost as expensive to make as the F150 and they couldn't get anywhere near the price so the margins weren't there. I don't see that as changing.
BTW, I had an '01 Ranger and replaced it with a '13 F150. I probably would have replaced it with a Ranger but I really like the F150. The back seats are actually usable (both extended cabs). ;-)
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On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 21:17:52 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

I'd rather drive my 21 year old Ranger than a new Colorado.
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wrote:

For me it wasn't the cost of service, it was the frequency of required REPAIRS that soured it for me. There were little STUPID things going wrong all the time - and most of it stuff that had been going wrong on GM vehicles for years, if not decades - and were not addressed, year after year. Add that to the FACT that it could not (with a 3.8 liter engine) tow the trailer thar my previous Ford Aerostar - which was significantly (well, over 100 lb) heavier, could tow with a 3 liter with absolutely no problem.
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On 2/15/2017 2:11 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I think number one on the list were blower motors when I was still in the business, GM. Followed by alternators, and AC compressors.
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wrote:

And intake manifolds and gaskets, and timing cover gaskets - and basically anything that moves. In 100,000km I replaced the ball joints and other front end parts twice -0n the TranSport, while never replacing any parts in 240,000km on each of 2 Aerostarrs and 350,000km on the ranger, and over 240,000 on my last Chrysler (88 New Yorker) - and none in 150,000+/- on the PT Cruiser. And wheel bearings - at leasat 6 on the TranSport and none between the 3 Fords and 2 Mopars. A friend has an Impala, a Sierra and a Silverado - and with relatively low mileage on all three, has spent more on repairs on EACH of the vehicles than I have on my last 5. _ and that's not counting the warranty repairs. - and none of mine have had any warranty left when I bought them.
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On Wed, 15 Feb 2017 05:50:09 -0500, "J. Clarke"

Hey, I had this great deal offered to me (after I had left the dealership) and I figured "what could it hurt" (other than my pride and my wallet)? Last GM I had owned was a Chevy -'28 AB National, the one before that a 35 Master, unless you count the '72 Vauxhaul.(which was actually a pretty darn good car). Figured I'd give another GM a try - '95 Pontiac TranSport.
BIG mistake.
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On 2/14/2017 8:12 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

Of course, which is exactly why brake lines should be made from stainless steel and not from crap that starts to rust 3 minutes after installation.

At the time I didn't know I would be risking my life on substandard GM breaking systems.
--
Jack
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

Which specific alloy of stainless steel should be used and why that alloy and not some other alloy? Engineering is always a compromise.
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On Thu, 16 Feb 2017 19:04:10 -0500, "J. Clarke"

And a major factor in engineering is economics, always a compromise.
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On 2/16/2017 7:04 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

One that makes them not rust out. Your local stainless steel manufacture will gladly help them out. I could tell them but no reason on earth they can't find out from a better source.

Perhaps a few $Billion in fines would help them compromise on the side of a safe braking system, rather than $billions for fudging on MPG...
(Posted at end of NUMEROUS lines of extraneous text to conform to ignorance level of previous poster[s])
--
Jack
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On 2/17/2017 10:57 AM, Jack wrote: Snip

Don't take this like I am ganging up on you. ;~)
A billion dollar fine for an auto manufacturer for a brake problem that I was never aware of when I was in that business, service manager of an Oldsmobile dealer. And this may actually be more common in recent years but up until 1995 not really a thing except in isolated cases.
How about a billion dollar fine against all TS manufacturers that did not care about our safety enough to build a safer saw when they had the opportunity. I will give you the possibility that it may have been expensive. But giving you that, the brand that out sells all others in the USA pretty much is the most expensive saw in it's class.
Has anyone heard of someone that has been injured on a non SawStop TS? Yeah....;~) Has any one heard of some one that has been injured on a SawStop. Not so far, by me.
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On 2/17/2017 1:11 PM, Leon wrote:

Did they even have anti-lock brakes when you were in the business. My 2001 GMC truck was the first vehicle I owned with ABS brakes, and they were a clear safety hazard as they failed routinely. Brake lines rusting out is also somewhat new I believe. Never had any rust out until the 3 GM vehicles I owned since 2001. So that is 100% brake line failure for GM vehicles. The fact you are/were unaware of the problem means little to me. The fact I became aware from first hand experience, and both garages I go to were also aware of it. I suspect the ABS problem has been fixed, not so sure about the brake lines, but I quit buying GM products, so won't ever have additional 1st hand experience with them. Also, someone sent me the GM recall on the ABS, and the fix was to clean the sensors. THAT didn't work, but shows there certainly was a problem, besides just my truck.

How many died from stubbing their toe, or whacking off a finger on a TS? Many thousands die in auto accidents, and many more are seriously injured, far worse than 99.999% of table saw accidents. Defective brake system would seem to be something that deserves more attention than fudging on a MPG test. (I mention stubbing toe on TS because I read here that if an idiot walks into his saw an breaks a toe, it would go down as a TS accident...)

Well, I've never been injured by a table saw in almost 60 years of usage, with no safety devices, and I know only one person that has ever been cut, and it was not serious, and he was not very handy. Wait, I also know a mechanic that got cut on a saw, also not very seriously, but he was handy, but also drunk...
Are you saying Braking systems on cars are less important than fudging on mpg stats, or having a gadget on a table saw to protect everyone from themselves?
--
Jack
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On 2/18/2017 11:31 AM, Jack wrote:

I do not think so, when I worked for the dealership, cehicles having anti lock brakes. But my 97 Chevy Silverado did and they worked as advertised on numerous occasions. But that is not to say that there was no possibility of a problem. Had this been an inherent problem or happening often there certainly would have been a campaign/recall.

I highly suspect that people dying in auto injuries is less of a result of complete brake failure.
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wrote:

correct. Mechanical failure is cited in only 10-15% of all automotive accidents (and that includes things like brake or turn signal lamps not working) with tire and wheel problems being the majority and total brake loss WAY down the list.
In the list of causes of fatal auto colisions, mechanical failure doesn't even make the top 25.
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On 2/18/2017 9:28 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

If only 1% die from brake failure, that would be 3-400 a year. If "they" completely banned the use of ALL saws, I think the lives saved would be about ZERO.
Proving someone died because their ABS system failed would be next to impossible, at least in my truck it was intermittent. Rusted lines would be easier to prove, but looking at a mangled wreck, one might expect a brake line to be ripped apart. Also, when I was a kid, and worked in a collision shop, never once do I remember anyone trying to determine if a mechanical failure caused the wreck. This may have changed, but I doubt it.
A friend of my wife ran though the side of a building and she said her gas pedal stuck. Could easily have been brake failure IMO. I believe it was a Lexus and people were suing them for stuck gas pedals.
--
Jack
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On Sunday, February 19, 2017 at 10:29:39 AM UTC-5, Jack wrote:

One could assume that with the advancement of accident reconstruction capabilities it might not be that hard to determine if a rusted brake line was the cause.
Visual inspection of the brake lines, even if mangled, could show a difference between "collision mangled" in some sections and "blown out rust spots" in others. Lack of skid marks, brake fluid upstream from the accident site, the vehicle's black box, etc. could all help in making the determination.
Any of the teams from the various CSI's would have it figured out in the first 10 minutes. ;-)

The daughter of a co-worker recently drove her boyfriend's pick-up into a utility pole - by choice.
She was driving downhill towards a red light at a very busy intersection. She applied the brake and the pedal went right to the floor. Being a fairly young driver (18) and in her first real emergency situation, her first thought wasn't to try the emergency brake, it was to *not* go through the red light.
She chose the pole instead, which did a real good job of stopping the truck. Poor kid. She had to quit high school sports because of multiple concussions and then suffered a serious one during the accident.
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