2002 Unisaw

Page 7 of 9  
Leon wrote:

The "mess" is not a concern at all. It just makes sense to use a blade cover. Like krw mentioned, my "O-Rings" would crack up here! I spent several hours yesterday thinking about blade covers. Some "engineering-like" thinking too. Folks act like I'm sitting on my hands. Evidently, I need to learn to work Lexan Polycarbonate! It's sort of like wood, except you can see through it!
Bill
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wrote:

Biggest problem is it melts when cut with high speed implements is what I experienced. I can set my bandsaw on slow as she goes and avoid the melting problem.
Of course using the oven and a form to curved a piece could be a start of some household discord.
You can find scrap Lexan on the net, I have a box of it I bought sometime ago.
Mark
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Markem wrote:

Hmm.. My 14" BS is not variable speed. But I have a scroll saw and a jig saw (and the JS may be variable speed). Did you melt it trying to buff the edges (I've got an 8in bench grinder that will run at 1725 RPM on slow). Thank you for making me aware of the "melting" issue.
Bill

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I didn't have a problem with that when I cut Lexan on my table saw a year or so ago. And I've cut plexiglas (acrylic) on the table saw many times without a melting problem.
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Doug Miller wrote:

I exchanged an email with the fellow that made the video and he was very helpful. He cuts the material with a bandsaw and routes the edges using a plywood template, on a router table. I will share whatever presentable results I come up with! : )
Cheers, Bill
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Same experience. AAMOF, the company I buy mine from has a Unisaw with a carbide blade setup in their shop specifically for that purpose. I have them rough cut the big sheets to make them easier to carry, then cut to spec on my table saw.
I've also made angled cuts in polycarbonates using the TS-75 with no problems, and Have also used spiral router bits with good results.
IME, the key component for good results seems to be high quality, carbide blades; and high quality spiral bits for routing.
--
www.ewoodshop.com (Mobile)

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Swingman wrote:

I don't doubt Swingman for a second. But after looking at $70 router bits (w/bearing), one become curious what they might accomplish with a BS and emery cloth. Even with a good router bit, the result would depend on making a good template. And this is a "One-of"-project. With the "naive approach", I would double-face tape two pieces together and cut and sand to the line. Please assess.
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wrote:

Sounds like a great plan to me Bill.
Mark
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Markem wrote:

Thanks Mark! That's all I needed. Just *one* person to blame if it doesn't work (J/K!). In retrospect, lots of times the simple ways are the appropriate ones, and I think this is one of those times. I tried to pick up some Lexan at a Borg today, but did not score (that's a little glass humor...).
Bill
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As far as I know, the only places in Indy where you can buy polycarbonate plastic (Lexan) are: -- Meyer Plastics on E. 65th St., 1/2 mi west of Binford Blvd -- Auburn Plastics on Shadeland Ave, 1/4 mi north of I-70
Meyer will let you pick through their scrap bin, and not charge you for whatever you find there.
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Doug Miller wrote:

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On 12/27/2013 7:52 PM, Bill wrote:

Not sure of the price you paid, but 1/4" will be very useful. Consider that it would be great for many projects. Now if you are using this for the blade guard, consider making the arms long, so that you can counterbalance the weight of the guard if the guard comes out heavy. The counter weight would make guard lighter. This is not hard to re-engineer Bill, everything we do in life we must adjust to the situation.
--
Jeff

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woodchucker wrote:

Thanks Jeff. Here is a link to a video showing the *actual guard* I want to make. The linkage and support are separate projects. Notice that the top of the guard never moves (while sawing).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxZOO_zcpNM

Bill
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On 12/27/2013 8:46 PM, Bill wrote:

Ok, that won't require a counter balance.
--
Jeff

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Bill wrote:

I am considering using my router template (bushings?) kit, along with some double-fluted bits. According to the the folks who make Makrolon, HSS double or triple fluted bits can be used on the material (of course, that may indeed yield a lower standard). That raised a thought: It seems like, given a choice, one would want to use larger diameter bits, both for stability and to help disiplate any heat--though it would increase the effective speed (proportionally with diameter). In contrast, all of the spiral bits I've seen are of small diameter. I don't argue that smaller bits may be more versatile. I would have experimented already, but I'm going to have to make a make-shift router table to accomplish this task.
Bill
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Bill wrote:

I was reading at Pat Warner's website, and he indicates that large bits be avoided for the sake of unnecessary vibration (and resonance).
Bill
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On 1/1/2014 3:03 AM, Bill wrote:

Well, Pat's a smart guy with a lot of good stuff, but if you need a profile, I would not hesitate to use a large bit.
After a certain size though, it pays to use a shaper, or profile in small sizes and join if possible. Most of the time it's not hence the need for large bits.
Also you can go to vertical bits, but they scallop more.
--
Jeff

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Bill wrote:

Consider a 72" long beam consisting of 2" by 2" square steel tubing, 1/8" thick, fixed at each end. Assume I attach a 3' beam right in the middle, perhaps cantilevered, to which my blade guard is affixed. How much "rigidness" have I bought myself, as far as the beam is concerned? I believe we are talking about the "strength" of the steel tubing. I realize that if I shorten the 72" beam, the rigidness will improve, but how is it doing so far? By comparison, lesser material options that are available would probably seem flimsy, no? To provide a more complete picture, I intend that this beam will span an outfeed table.
Thanks! Bill
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Bill wrote:

A related question is "Will it sag with time?" (like a 2by4 hanging in the same manner would?) Maybe I need to use an I-beam (that's a joke!) Maybe a small I-beam (that's not a joke!)
Bill
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One can usually test the span, and or get a sense if there is any bending...... It sounds like with square tubing, and 6' you have little flex. Many engineered beams take advantage of light weight plywood for the strength similar to "I" beam trusses.... If a person were to use that in combination with the tubing, no flexing would happen. Again, it is a tough picture to see....... john
"Bill" wrote in message
Bill wrote:

Consider a 72" long beam consisting of 2" by 2" square steel tubing, 1/8" thick, fixed at each end. Assume I attach a 3' beam right in the middle, perhaps cantilevered, to which my blade guard is affixed. How much "rigidness" have I bought myself, as far as the beam is concerned? I believe we are talking about the "strength" of the steel tubing. I realize that if I shorten the 72" beam, the rigidness will improve, but how is it doing so far? By comparison, lesser material options that are available would probably seem flimsy, no? To provide a more complete picture, I intend that this beam will span an outfeed table.
Thanks! Bill
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