OT - Old British Cars

Remember when just about every car had the same Lucas Indicator. Dipswitch / Horn control crudely arrached to the steering column with a clamp?
I once had a Hillman Imp - it had a indicator stalk that was different - it was latched by a solenoid - which cot released by a switch on the column. First I had seen that had a bit of original design back in those days.
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On 22/01/2018 11:01, DerbyBorn wrote:

I remember the indicator switch being on the dashboard. It had an indicator bulb in the centre. I also remember the indicator arms that hinged out. Whoever thought that was the way to do it?
Bill
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On Mon, 22 Jan 2018 14:54:15 +0000

Trafficators were a great idea - in the early days when drivers still expected to see hand signals out of the window, the trafficator combined similar movement with a nice modern amber light. The fact that they were dim and got stuck was a problem with the implementation not the concept. :-)
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Everyone, until some time in the fifties.
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Roger Hayter

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On 22-Jan-18 4:15 PM, Roger Hayter wrote:

Semaphore signals date back to the early part of the 20th century, before most cars had electric lighting.

Flashing indicators were patented in 1938.
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Nightjar wrote:

Like trucks with a hand on a stick.
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On 22/01/2018 17:01, Nightjar wrote:

And were illegal.
Bill
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On 24-Jan-18 3:50 AM, Bill Wright wrote:

Really? This article from 1956 refers to 'all three types of indicator at present approved', which suggest they were legal for some time before then:
https://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2013/may/17/new-rules-car-indicators-1956
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On 24/01/2018 09:29, Nightjar wrote:

My grandad's brother was prosecuted for having flashing indicators some time between 1932 when he started driving and 1939. Fined 7/6d.
Bill
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On 24-Jan-18 7:13 PM, Bill Wright wrote:

If they were patented in 1938, that suggests it would have been towards the end of that period. Was it a foreign car, or how else was it fitted with flashing indicators?
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Maybe it was the same situation as flashing red/white lights on bikes, which used to be technically illegal when they first came out because they weren't on all the time but only intermittently - completely ignoring the fact that flashing lights are more conspicuous than steady ones and so are very desired when marking hazards, or cars that are planning to change direction. A case of the law being a long way behind common sense improvements.
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On 24/01/2018 20:04, NY wrote:

As far as bikes go, flashing rear lights are a massive improvement - as you say, they are highly visible - the batteries also last a very long time.
Flashing front lights are less so. The ones that are white versions of the rear ones serve the same purpose well, but the intensely bright lights that many cyclists are using (seems to be intensely bright or none at all around here) should be banned from road use, unless a proper steady dipped/steady main/weak flash version with the switch right at the riders fingertips can be arranged. The flash catches your eye and you automatically look at it, only to be totally dazzled by the brightness, making them dangerous.
It is bad enough with high intensity car lights bouncing on bumps, but on bikes, even when not flashing, they swing from side to side, bounce around and generally point a high intensity beam in all sorts of unintended directions. They have no height control, are mounted on handlebars, close to drivers' eye level - or, even worse, worn on the head, so the cyclist sees you, looks at you and dazzles you immediately!
SteveW
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On Wed, 24 Jan 2018 21:13:41 +0000

dicators-1956

I have also found that flashing front lights can be difficult to identify for their position, they shut off before the viewer has been able to identify their location, only to come back on ready to blind the viewer. The effect is worse the faster the flash rate.
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On 25-Jan-18 12:34 AM, Davey wrote:
...

I have that problem with the red flashing lights on unlit roads. I can know there is a bike ahead, but with no idea of how far away it is.
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On 24/01/2018 20:04, NY wrote:
it fitted with flashing indicators?

Flashing bike lights aren't illegal but not having one that is on all the time when its dark is. You need two sets if you want flashing ones.
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On Thu, 25 Jan 2018 15:25:27 +0000

That's no longer true, at least for rear lights - the situation regarding approved front lights is less clear-cut.
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wrote:

I'd find it very difficult to cycle at night with the road ahead lit *only* by a flashing white light. I'm amazed at the cyclists who do this. I'd go for a brighter constant white light (*), and a dimmer "to be visible" light which hopefully was too dim to be visible as reflected light off the road ahead.
(*) Hopefully with a beam pattern that did not dazzle oncoming drivers/cyclists.
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On 25/01/2018 23:31, NY wrote:

I don't think anyone expects bike front lights to illuminate the road ahead. In the old days, all you had was a quivering dot of light on the road a few feet ahead.
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Max Demian

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On 26/01/18 12:10, Max Demian wrote:

That was better than pitch black.
No streetlights where I grew up
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On Friday, 26 January 2018 12:10:58 UTC, Max Demian wrote:

Now I see 'light traces' of a bike projected onto the road just in front of the bike usualy in green.

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