OT: Chinglish instructions for a floodlight

I just bought an LED PIR floodlight which has the following instructions:
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Schedule radar inductive device description.
Radar induction voted light lamp induction device (3G following) using more general Le effect principle, independant development plane antenna launches received circuit, intelligent detection around electromagnetic environment, automatically adjustment work state, industry first radar induction voted light lamp induction device products features:
1. Work way: induction switch connected Hou, in delay time paragraph within, as has mobile objects, switch will continued connected, until people left and extended time.
2. The photo control built-in: the light intensity according to the outside world, to control whether the switch in order to save energy.
3. And infrared products compared: radar switch induction distance more far, angle, wide, no died district, can penetrating glass, and thin wood.
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[I lost the ability to type at this point]
It is a good device though, 70W power in measured by me, with a 95% PF. Quoted 100W for some reason. Quoted 8000 lumens out, appears about right comparing to halogen bulbs. 8.8 times more efficient than an incandescent, which is reasonable for an LED I guess. I've seen up to 11.5x, but that's probably without any diffusers etc. And it is distance more far, angle wide, no died district, just like it says.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
English is one of the most difficult, if not the most difficult, language to learn for a non-speaking English person. I don't ever expect instructions to be spot on from any product made outside of the English speaking borders.
Reply to
Hawk
In article <rmn5ld$i65$ snipped-for-privacy@dont-email.me, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...
When products are made in other countries, the instruction book should be proof read by someone in the country it is sold in that is very fluent in the language. They could probably get a couple of college students to do the review for a few hundred bucks or maybe just give them the product if they would go over the instruction book.
Reply to
Ralph Mowery
I don't ever expect instructions to be spot on from any product made anywhere even with something as simple as a fork or glass.
Reply to
invalid unparseable
Or just use Google translate. It can translate anything from English into another language and back with virtually no mistakes. It's not just a computer translation, errors can be corrected by users to improve future translations.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
In article snipped-for-privacy@news.east.earthlink.net>, Ralph
I remember the UK boss of a Japanese subsiduary telling me he'd asked Head Office to allow him to do just that. His request was refused on the grounds that it wouldn't affect the sales figures and therefore be a waste of money.
But it works both ways, I found it easier to read the handbook of some French equipment in the original rather than reading an Englisman's attempt at translating.
Reply to
charles
Someone has to pay for the translation and edits. Either the manufacturers do so and add the cost to the product or it doesn't get done.
Reply to
Hawk
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Another word one can use is ...... dumb.
But I don't think you meant that!
In fun! :-D No hurt intended, 'Hawk'.
Reply to
David_B
I don't know either language but what I've read and told, English is by far the worse, which I believe due to homophones, contractions and possessive nouns, which most English speaking people can't even get accurate.
I speak Spanish and one great thing about the Spanish language is their vowels have one sound only. The English vowels offer 2 sounds depending on usage and we all know the "sometimes Y" vowel. Additionally, other than the "CH" in Spanish, it doesn't contain "PH" for "F", or "C" sounding like "K" or "S" or other sounds/usage that confuse the hell out of people.
Reply to
Hawk
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Good observation. Good thing you smart people know what I meant.
T climb out of the hole, I'll correct with "people who don't speak English".
Reply to
Hawk
Yeah, that should produce a much better result than the abortion above, but it is less clear how bad the original was in chinese etc.
Any major language, anyway.
That's not correct.
Reply to
Fred
I know virtually no German, but when I read out the German instructions to her mobile phone for a laugh in front of my neighbour, she was astonished I could pronounce everything correctly and assumed I could speak German. Isn't it obvious how to pronounce German?
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
I've often thought the same, after many hi fis where you need to contact the loopstick by bottom. IE the ferrite rod fastens on a little plastic clip sticking out of the base of the rear of the tuner of course.
Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff (Sofa
I know someone who speaks fluent English and Swedish, and used to teach English to Swedish people (he now teaches English to English people in a school). He told me it's easier to teach contractions than non-contractions, as then they can understand people easier and speak more naturally.
I can understand what you mean about the homophones. Even though I know perfectly well the difference between their there and they're, I often type the wrong one. I think part of the process between thought and keyboard is audio (although not aloud).
Suth Effrican is probably even easier, just one vowel for everything.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
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I was told off for calling someone dumb in a game forum. Not for calling them stupid, but because I might have offended non-speaking people. My suggestion that "I see" should therefore be banned too didn't go down well.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
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I didn't notice. My brain autocorrected it.
Northerners do not shorten "to" to T", they shorten "the" to "T". It should be "To climb out of t' hole". Or omit "the" altogether.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
i assume they could speak decent Chinese, if not, how would they be clever enough to design a functional lamp?
I've tried many of the ones listed, including ones I'd never heard of.
Provide an example, preferably amusing. The infamous "invisible idiot" cannot be recreated.
>> It's not just a computer translation, errors can be corrected by users to >> improve future translations.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey

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