Sawstop's suit against Ryobi is upheld

Page 5 of 13  
On Oct 9, 1:22 am, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

This has been gone over before and you're still spreading disinformation.
From SawStop's FAQ:
6. Will cutting green or “wet” wood activate the SawStop safety system? SawStop saws cut most wet wood without a problem. However, if the wood is very green or wet (for example, wet enough to spray a mist when cutting), or if the wood is both wet and pressure treated, then the wood may be sufficiently conductive to trigger the brake. Accordingly, the best practice is to dry wet or green wood before cutting by standing it inside and apart from other wood for about one day. You can also cut wet pressure treated wood and other conductive material by placing the saw in bypass mode to deactivate the safety system.
That really doesn't sound too expensive or difficult. Well, other than that someone would be doing their tablesaw a nasty turn by cutting wood that was wet enough to spray. If someone is used to cutting wood that's that wet with their tablesaw, maybe they should invest in a beater saw and not ruin the good one.
Waiting a day (or ten) for wood to dry doesn't seem like a lot to ask, especially when nearly every one on this newsgroup has concurred that you let green wood dry in a stickered pile for a year per inch of thickness. Peter Follansbee might disagree, but he doesn't use any power tools at all so his opinion doesn't count. ;)
R
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wrote:

This has been gone over before and you're still spreading disinformation.
From SawStop's FAQ:
6. Will cutting green or “wet” wood activate the SawStop safety system? SawStop saws cut most wet wood without a problem. However, if the wood is very green or wet (for example, wet enough to spray a mist when cutting), or if the wood is both wet and pressure treated, then the wood may be sufficiently conductive to trigger the brake. Accordingly, the best practice is to dry wet or green wood before cutting by standing it inside and apart from other wood for about one day. You can also cut wet pressure treated wood and other conductive material by placing the saw in bypass mode to deactivate the safety system.
And after activating the bypass, some one then cuts a finger off . Do they now sue the makers of Sawstop for telling them to turn off a feature that they pushed through to stop that from happening ? Jim
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I guess you'd have to ask that person, eh?
I was addressing the disinformation about the difficulty about cutting wet wood, not the ability of a person/lawyer to sue over any damned thing at all.
R
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On 10/9/2011 10:11 AM, Jim Northey wrote:

Not at all, the operator turned the system off. He pays the stupid tax and hopefully he has insurance to cover the thousands of dollars that his mistake just cost him.
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That theory doesn't work for guards. Why should it for the bypass?
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On 10/9/2011 4:29 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

What theory? Not all operations performed on a TS can be done with factory guards. It is a correct procedure to remove the guard for certain procedures.
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"He pays the stupid tax". No, we all pay his "stupid tax" whenever someone wins such a lawsuit.

Sure (how does SS do DADOs?), but the suit *was* about removed guards (fence?). Damned fools will still hurt themselves.
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wrote:

There's a web site that answers questions about the SawStop. It's www.sawstop.com.
You won't be giving up your soul if you visit the web site and get such information yourself. Promise.
R
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On 10/9/2011 7:08 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

We all pay the stupid tax when some one cuts them selves and uses their/our insurance to pay for the repair. Rates go up,

SS does dado's the same way as it does with a standard blade and with the guard off but it will still stop the dado blades if you touch them.
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Using that logic, you can restrict freedom in any way you want. Some people get hurt by guns, knives, and even baseball bats. No thanks!

So, will SS buy me a new $300 dado set if it misfires? I think I heard I'm outta luck with the $125 blade.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

There's a button for that you know.

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On 10/9/2011 12:22 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

With this apparently being common knowledge and it most likely coming with a warning to override the system...... Don't run you car into telephone poles if you don't want it to have dents. Don't cut damp wood on your TS it will make the top rust.
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"manufacturers that have decided that more safety is too high a price to pay."
No, it's us. We have decided so with purchase after purchase of low- cost saws from HFT, etc. When better quality, safer alternatives were available for twice the price and maybe more.
It is the proverbial Free Market - or is it the fickle fingers of fate?
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On Sun, 9 Oct 2011 21:30:12 -0700 (PDT), Hoosierpopi

And *that* is the story of the entire North American market with the bulk of it's manufacturing and services contracted somewhere overseas or out of country. Good for the lifestyle of current generations, not so good for soon to be future generations.
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Dave wrote:

The United States is the world's leading manufacturer. No other country is even close.
"Jobs" are not part of a zero-sum game. Jobs that move overseas do not, in the aggregate, mean fewer jobs here. If anything, jobs that move to, say, China mean MORE jobs are created here than are lost.
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On 10/10/2011 8:01 AM, HeyBub wrote:

If you take China out of the picture.
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No, CONGRESS is why jobs are scattering to the winds. It's just too hard to make things here. ...and getting much worse.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Well, you're right - if you're talking about regulations and such.
Another blame to put on Congress is the excessive corporate tax, currently 2nd highest in the world. This encourages corporations to move their jobs - and make their profits - overseas. If not for the tax, they'd keep their corporate headquarters here and distribute their overseas profits amongst their domestic stockholders.
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Both.
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On 10/10/2011 8:37 PM, HeyBub wrote:

You forgetting about high manufacturing costs to do business here? It's not just the taxes.
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