Consumer Product Safety Comm. to discuss proposed SawStop technology safety rule

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Reposting a message I found in ABPW:
(FWIW)
On Tue, 05 Sep 2006 18:47:54 -0500, 25th Century Quaker

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, for SawStop

I find the numbers a bit hard to believe. How many table saw users are there? I can't find a single person at work that owns one.
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I work for a small company (20 people) and there are at least four of us that have a table saw. My neighbor across the street has one, as does the neighbor next door. Given that percentage, with 300 million people in the US, that is one hell of a lot of saws. I did see the number of injuries someplace other that Saw Stop too, but I don't recall where it was.
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I respect the technology and I believe that the SawStop is an excellant product. I do not like the fact that the manufacture is trying to force his product down my throat. I want to make the buying decision, not being forced by some lawyer!
I can not believe his mission in life is to make all of us woodworkers safe, but to line his own pockets!
Mike
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And what you prefer to believe has been the subject of lively debate for some time. However, there's always two sides to every story and I believe there is some substance to the debate that the bulk of other tablesaw manufacturers banded together to "slow" this technology.
Either way, it's a good technology and if money was no object for people, I think this technology would not be receiving near as many negative comments that it has.
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wrote:

We'll see what happens when they get their contractor saw version out. I think I read something in the $750-800 range. $3000 for the cabinet version is pretty tough to take when you're using a $550 saw now. An extra $200 doesn't seem like very much for what you're getting.
But you can bet this is spurring every saw manufacturer to have their R&D department working on ways to do it while gettng around the guy's patent. They'll promise they're going to do it themselves without the law.
Once everyone is doing it I don't think it will be adding more than $100 to the cost
-Leuf
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The longer you have to think about a $2000 upgrade, the easier that pill is to swallow. Had my TV broken down 2 years ago it would have been repaired. Since I had been looking at $2500 for a new one for the last 2 years the one I bought 2 weeks ago for $2000 was much easier to swallow. LOL
I hope you are correct about others coming up with other ways to add serious safety improvements as this is the first step taken in many many years towards user safety.
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On Thu, 07 Sep 2006 01:06:13 GMT, "Leon"

One other thing is that while Sawstop says there's no way to upgrade an old saw with the technology, I can't see as how all the cast iron of the top and the motor can't be reused, and those combined are a substantial proportion of the cost of the saw, and the weight of the machine. And of course the fence can be reused. So I don't see why the manufacturers couldn't offer just the cabinet and guts as an upgrade path.
-Leuf
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wrote:

Good point. From what I gather the trunion and blade brake are basically the only differences. Oh yeah, I looked at the owners manual and IIRC there a lot of lock out sensors and a computer chip that monitors settings, and other functions.
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I agree with you Mike. there comes a point in time when good common sense and a little training goes a long way.
My father operated a Delta Unisaw for decades and never once had an injury and he operated it as part of his full time job. I have operated the same saw for many years as a hobbyist and never once had an injury. Safety features on the saw? None at all. The saw was stripped of the blade guard long before I was born. My father taught me to use the Unisaw and maybe that is what keeps my digits attached.
The scariest saw in my shop? The band saw. My sons and I agree on that. The one that will maim the quickest? The table saw of course. The tool most likely to injure you? The drill press. The safest saw in the shop? The scroll saw.
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R. Pierce Butler wrote:

Wow, I don't agree with that scary rating. I think the bandsaw is the safest saw to use. The cutting motion is down, no risk of kick back. Basically, all you have to do is pay attention that you don't move your hand into the blade.. Don't see it as any scarier than a scroll saw.
The drill press is most likely to injure you? How? Unless a bit gets caught in a piece of wood and spins around, how are you going to get hurt on a drill press? Obviously, like the bandsaw, I assume you pay attention and don't put your hand under the bit.
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I bet the real "danger saw" is the hand held circular saw (AKA skilsaw) but I bet chan saws actually cause more accidents. They just get loaded in with logger injuries and not construction injuries.
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bf wrote:

The drill press is most likely to injure because it is taken for granted too often. Not likely to be too bad but painful.
Jess.S
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mike wrote:

Me either.
Now that SS has actual saws for sale, the market should decide if the brake should be on all saws. If SawStop makes a mint, the other manufacturers will have to either come up with a comparable feature, or license it from SS.
If it's mandated on new saws, say buh-bye! to $400 table saws, like the Bosch, Rigid, or Grizzly. Think of what it will do to the used table saw market for non-commercial users! <G>
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I wonder how this thing will work with a dado blade. Jim
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Jim Northey wrote:

SawStop has a special cartridge for dado blades.
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Maybe a phone call to SawStop will answer your questions and prevent you from assuming something that may not be.
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On Wed, 06 Sep 2006 15:44:35 GMT, "Leon"

I'm not going to bother. I won't be a SawStop customer.
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That's what I thought.
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On Wed, 06 Sep 2006 21:56:35 GMT, "Leon"

It's not because of the device. I like it. I was wishing them success. They appeared to be going down the right path. Then they just had to try for government regulation to get what they can't get on their own.
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