2002 Unisaw

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I was looking at parts diagram for a 2002 Unisaw that I located that didn't have a blade guard or splitter. I was surprised. From the parts diagram it looks like a real pain to remove the splitter (2 screws, sideways?). Not only that it would cost $150 to obtain this part. Maybe I've already deduced why it's "not present"?
Thee may be value in a riving knife instead? FWIW, this saw has a Unifence that didn't move as smoothly as other fences I've seen, it needed to be "palm tapped"--but that detail doesn't seem so critical. Maybe it just needs wax? It locked solid however (though it is Aluminum and may flex a little--you can see I've been reading! ;) )
Looks like it may either be this saw or a new Grizzly G0691. Does Grizzly have a "great feeling" fence or just so-so? After all is said and done, the cost of delivery of both saws is about the same(which improves the price of the Grizzly, relatively speaking).
Cheers, Bill
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Model number? Lots of different Unisaws in the early nineties.
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-Since- the early nineties.
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Swingman wrote:

The model number on the cabinet is 36-829, which I've since learned is the model number of the *cabinet*. %-) The serial number begins 02B, which places it in February, 2002 I think. It's not a "Platinum edition", it's plain, but it has a little sticker "USA stripes" on the lower right. Electric is on left side, motor cover on right side (underneath, not on the outside), saw is RT. It's 83" long with Unifence. Based on the date (2002), I think it's Model 36-841.
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On 11/25/2013 9:05 PM, Bill wrote:

Yep, that shows a different splitter than mine. Mine is a one knob affair that goes off and on in less than ten seconds.
Since I don't use the blade guard, but I do use the splitter, I cut the kickback pawls off the splitter and made it short enough that I can leave it on for sled crosscuts, which is about 95% of crosscutting I do in the shop.
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff#5850516674541872338
And it still provides ample kickback protection for rip cuts.
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On 11/26/2013 8:23 AM, Swingman wrote:

No redirect
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJustStuff?noredirect=1#5850516674541872338

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On 11/26/2013 9:23 AM, Swingman wrote:

Thanks for the pic. I will look closer next time I see the saw. I will bring a small flashlight too! : )
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I've got a late 90's Unisaw with the the Besemeyer fence and overhead guard with the same splitter. Looking at the manual for the overhead guard it looks like the splitter and the thumb nut set up are available parts that came with the overhead guard.
Mike M
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Bill wrote:

------------------------------------------------------- http://tinyurl.com/3uxteay
Have used this device on a Unisaw and it not only functional, but easy to use.
Easy to install, easy to remove when you don't need it.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Thank you, Lew! I just added it to my "wish list".
Bill

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wrote:

I have one. That's what I was referring to as a "knife", which it really isn't. It's a great addition. However, I wasn't impressed by the installation. It's kinda kludgy.
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Don't let the Unifence deter you. Very flexible:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Works great with the delta Unifence. Been using one for ten years and recommend it. Great for jigs and easy add ons, like sacrificial fences. Only caveat is that the Unifence doesn't work well with "hold downs" (board buddies), which I don't use in any event.
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Swingman wrote:

Thanks, I save a link to that. The product reviews back you up.

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Swingman wrote:

This Uni-T-fence is sold in 43" and 36". When ripping a large piece do you slide your fence forward a bit (toward you), so that you can get more of the edge of the stuff you are cutting against the fence before it reaches the blade? Otherwise, I don't understand why one would be concerned about the additional length here.
Question: If you were trimming a 40" piece of plywood using the fence (I hesitate to call it "ripping"), would you stand right behind it and hold it down real well near the blade and hold it real well against the fence? It seems what is really called for here is a good sled (that may be supported in part by the extension table as well as the miter slots). But if that were really true then the fence wouldn't be able to travel so far away from the blade (50"). I haven't yet really made sense of this. If I "knew absolutely nothing" this would make more sense to me...

Ah, my recollection had been that you liked the board buddies. Jim Tolpin, the author of "Table Saw Secrets" certainly likes them for dados, and especially for stopped dados. That was what got me thinking about the Uni-T-fence again. The Woodworking Show is coming to town this weekend.
You surely already know that dado blades are not allowed in some countries (I just mentioned that for a little "woodworking trivia"). Be careful when you travel abroad... ; )
Bill

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On 1/14/2014 5:25 AM, Bill wrote:

Sliding the fence out toward you to give you more of a guide before reaching the blade would be a definite advantage. If you check into most Euro style table saws most all use this type fence. The big advantage would be when cutting sheets of plywood and you are about 7' back from the front of the saw. It is tough to keep the panel parallel along a 12" section of fence before a blade than a much longer section before the blade.
Secondly you can use the fence to cross cut shore pieces more safely. The end of the fence can be slid to the front of the blade so that short pieces will not be trapped between the fence and the blade.

That would depend on the other dimension of the 40" piece of plywood. Consider that the heavier the piece of panel the less likely that the blade will throw the panel any appreciable distance. ;~)
If I am trimming a few inches off of a 40 x40 panel I stand in the middle of the panel pushing with my right hand and using my left hand to gently push the panel up against the fence. Basically I give most of the push towards the blade with my right hand and a little bit of push, just enough to keep the panel flat against the fence, with my left hand.

Actually I believe it is the "stacked" dado blades that are frowned upon. There are however dado blades, they call them something else. that will cut wide slots. These are typically more like a sharper cutter as they are wide and fixed in width IIRC.
http://www.felder-tooling.us/8head-017420/8head-019220/8head-wkzg-00920-8ba-k3-008-813-00120/8500-03-019-text-0320#
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If I "knew absolutely nothing" this would make more sense to me...
At this point, nothing will answer your questions better than a good deal more up close and personal experience using your table saw.
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Swingman wrote:

I just don't want it to throw anything at me (and I don't want to be in the line of fire if it tries....) And I don't want to have to explain that I didn't know I was doing something in a "stupid" way. As you suggested, Leon provided me with good answers to my questions.
Bill
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On 1/14/2014 5:02 PM, Bill wrote:

All in all you can't foresee what is going to be best for you. You cannot foresee all possible problems. You cannot foresee any gotcha's.
Like Swingman indicated, until you actually start using the saw, shop, over blade guard/dust collector you have no clue what you are going to actually want to end up with.
You can way over think all of this, and possibly put a lot of work into something that you may end up not liking. Better to make a decision from actual experience vs. a preconceived notion of something you have read or think you wold prefer.
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Leon wrote:

Okay. But having said that, what do you think of this choice of blades:
(Freud) LU74R (30-tooth, "glue-line rip") LU-85R (80-tooth, "ultimate cut-off")
and possibly LU80R ("Ultimate plywood"--so that LU85R above, doesn't get "abused").
I know there are a lot of Forrest WW-II fans, but the reviews were not very overwhelming, so it's sort of a tough call (but you can see which way I'm leaning).
According to my measurements, my Biesemeyer Blade spreader is .105-.107 inches. I'm not sure how small of a kerf I can go down to (and was not able to find further direction). Two of the blades above have kerfs of .116 and .118. We talking about a 1/100" of an inch, and "blade runout" (however much there is) is on my side here, so it doesn't seem like a problem. FWIW, I have no plan to cut anything thicker than 3/4" for now.
As Jeff suggested, I'll surely buy a lesser blade (if I can find any full kerf ones) to practice on. The Freud-Diablo's, IIRC, seem to have kerf around .91.
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------------- Freud once offered a set of blades consisting of a 24T rip, a 50T General purpose, and an 80T cross cut ply.
That set met all my needs when I added the 8" Freud stacked dado set.
Might want to check if the set is still offered at a set price. -------------------------------------------------------------------- "Bill" wrote:

--------------------------------------------------------------- Pardon my French, but after Leon signs off on a blade, who gives a fuck what the rest of the world has to say?
Time to spend some money.
Lew
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