Debug advice Kenmore coldspot 106-59422801 stopped refrigerating

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On Tue, 12 Jul 2016 00:08:49 -0000 (UTC), Danny D. wrote:

The main problem I have is that I don't know what a good compressor humming sounds like, compared to a bad compressor humming.
Is it safe to leave the test jig in place for an hour or three to see if the lines get cold?
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If the compressor is running, the discharge line (the smaller copper tube) will get warm (hot).
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On Mon, 11 Jul 2016 20:33:08 -0400, tom wrote:

Which line in this picture is that "discharge line" that will get hot?
http://i.cubeupload.com/wAX37P.jpg
How long will it take to get hot?
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The small line on the far right is the compressor high side (output). The bent tube in the center is the process tube where the system is pulled to vacuum then charged with refrigerant. The tube on the left is the suction line and pulls evaporated cold gas from the cold coils inside the refrigerator.
Do a google search on refrigeration cycle for more details.
It should begin to heat up quickly (minutes or so) if the compressor is running.
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On Tue, 12 Jul 2016 00:02:40 -0400, tom wrote:

Thanks for the information as to what the three tubes are.
How is the annotation on this photo?
http://i.cubeupload.com/LQ7jqz.jpg
The LRA is 17.6 amps and with just two leads on the RUN and COMMON, it's pulling 12 Amps.
I think I have to figure out whether there is a "restriction" in the flow of the R134a fluid/gas.
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The drawing looks correct.
I don't think it is a restriction in the gas circuit. Leaving the unit sit for a day would most likely let the pressures to equalize.
It might be a mechanical issue like a reed valve broken and jamming the piston.
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On Tue, 12 Jul 2016 11:36:19 -0400, tom wrote:

I don't know any other way to test for "mechanical" operation of the compressor.
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On 7/12/2016 3:22 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Pump out all the refrigerant. Saw the top off the compressor. After the inspection, weld the compressor using a gas tight "bead" of weld. Replace the refrigerant.
No problem for you, right?
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Christopher A. Young
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On Tue, 12 Jul 2016 18:33:27 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

:)
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On 7/11/2016 8:23 PM, Danny D. wrote:

That's a good point! Maybe it IS running with test jig. Do you have an AC ammeter? If so, check if the run current drops after a second or two with the test jig. If so, it's running. But if it stays high, it's not.

If it isn't running, the excess current from it being in the start mode continuously will overheat the compressor. That's what the overload device was protecting against. You might be thinking "So what?" & I see that point, but I'm not going to say that it would be safe.
Bob
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On Mon, 11 Jul 2016 20:35:30 -0400, Bob Engelhardt wrote:

I have a 10Amp Fluke 77 but I lent it to an ex brother in law, and it has never returned. So, currently I'm stuck with a radio shack dial ammeter, but it does have an inductive clip that I can clip on.
Looking at the manual it has 3A, 15A, and 30A AC current ranges.

I don't want to burn down the house for a frig!
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On 7/11/2016 10:18 PM, Danny D. wrote:

That's good - I would use the 15A range, 3A isn't going to be enough.
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On Mon, 11 Jul 2016 23:15:58 -0400, Bob Engelhardt wrote:

Hi Bob, Thanks for sticking with me in my hour of need!
I think the problem is mechanical, so I'd first like to clarify the inlet and outlet.
Is the inlet on the right and the outlet on the left in this picture?
http://i.cubeupload.com/9ZZ7fw.jpg
I am not sure if I interpret Locked Rotor Amperage (LRA) specs correctly (from googling), but this sticker on the R134a compressor shows a LRA of 17.6 amps, so I think the inrush current is 17.6 amps, so that would take the 30A scale, at least initially.
http://i.cubeupload.com/34bCaq.jpg
I tried the test with the capacitor, and without the capacitor (using a screwdriver to momentarily short the RUN and START terminals).
Then, as you suggested, I started on the 30A scale:
http://i.cubeupload.com/QzjAQt.jpg
On the 30A scale, the inductive current is 12A:
http://i.cubeupload.com/4gpdlF.jpg
On the 15A scale of the meter, the meter is pegged:
http://i.cubeupload.com/sOBHcz.jpg
I also doublechecked the resistance, which seems to show good numbers: A. COMMON to START = about 5 ohms (hard to read the Rx100 scale) B. COMMON to RUN = slightly less than 5 ohms C. START to RUN = slightly less than 10 ohms
Given all that, I tentatively assume that the motor is working fine electrically; but that mechanically, it seems to be locked up.
However, I would have expected 17.6 Amps if the motor were locked up, so, I'm curious why I get 12 Amps instead - but maybe that's because it never started?
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On 7/12/2016 10:59 AM, Danny D. wrote: ...

I can't help you there. Tom?

That sounds right.

If the motor isn't starting, that is "locked rotor". That it's 12A & not 17.6 is not particularly useful. 12A is still way more than running current. That's 1440 watts & I'd guess the operating power to be 400W (4A), maybe, probably less. 400W is about 1/3hp, which seems like a lot for a fridge.
Bob
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On Mon, 11 Jul 2016 20:35:30 -0400, Bob Engelhardt wrote:

Actually, I just realized I could leave the START wire off, right?
So the question is whether it's dangerous or not to just run with the two wires connected to the compressor for a few hours, RUN and COMMON?
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On 7/11/2016 10:20 PM, Ryou Kudo wrote:

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On 7/11/2016 10:20 PM, Ryou Kudo wrote:

Well, you need the Start wire for a few seconds, to get it started. Then the Start wire should NOT be connected.
But that doesn't change whether the compressor will overheat. Which it will if it hasn't actually started. With the overload protector in there, it only took, what, 20 seconds to trip? The engineer who designed it thought that 20 seconds was the longest that it should "run" if it hadn't started.
Bob
Excuse the previous null post - brain fart.
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On Saturday, July 9, 2016 at 8:00:58 PM UTC-4, Bob Engelhardt wrote:

There are motors where the cap is only used to start the motor and motors where the cap is required to run the motor as you describe. Which one that compressor is, IDK, but I agree with your concern.
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On Sun, 10 Jul 2016 05:54:29 -0700 (PDT), trader_4 wrote:

I'm sorry it took me so long but I had family things to do on Sunday. I built the test jig and tested the compressor.
http://i.cubeupload.com/WrCzv4.jpg
I think it's bad news. I'm uploading the pictures now.
BTW, I got zapped by the 12uF capacitor because I forgot it held a whopping charge after being unplugged.
Can a 12uF cap kill me?
Is it safe (for the cap) to short the terminals to discharge it? (It's a pretty good sized pop - certainly audible - and about 2 or 3 mm in white-hot spark size.)
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On Mon, 11 Jul 2016 15:02:16 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster wrote:

The markings on this cap are:
http://i.cubeupload.com/QBVskg.jpg
1. 12uF 2. 180VAC (it was charged to 120VAC) 3. 10,000AFC (I presume this is cycles?) 4. 50/60Hz
Can that 120VAC 12uF zap kill me? Is it safe (to the cap) to short the terminals?
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