Phablet stocking stuffers: iPhone 7 versus LG Stylo 3 Plus price/performance hardware comparison

He who is Carlos E.R. said on Tue, 26 Dec 2017 22:14:34 +0100:

All my phones have replaceable batteries - but some of my gift phones do not (since the kids like their iPhones and iPads).
Just like the four phones I just bought each can hold a 2 terabyte expansion card, they have FM radios, and they have removable batteries.
None of that is even possible on Apple equipment.
So it's a huge compromise in hardware any time you buy any Apple device.
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On 2017-12-26 23:57, harry newton wrote:

I don't buy any Apple device. Never.
--
Cheers, Carlos.

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He who is Carlos E.R. said on Wed, 27 Dec 2017 20:42:57 +0100:

I buy them all the time. I must have bought a half dozen over the past five years, so that's an average of more than one Apple device a year.
They are hugely primitive in what they can do (e.g., they can't even load a modern app launcher) compared to Android - but some kids (especially the non technical girls for the most part in my family) LOVE their iStuff.
Which is OK because they never do anything but punch buttons.
If they tried to debug a wifi problem, they'd find out that no iOS device can even do something as simple as graph wifi signal strength over time.
What's funny, is that all the iOS apologists like you will scream in hundreds upon hundreds of posts that an iOS device can do the simplest of things - but in the end - we found out that the typical iOS apologists don't know the difference between a decibel and a megabit.
It's a fact iOS devices can't even graph Wi-Fi signal strength over time <https://groups.google.com/d/msg/misc.phone.mobile.iphone/PZuec56EWB0/rX-L9xbYAQAJ
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He who is rbowman said on Mon, 25 Dec 2017 17:01:23 -0700:

What I meant was that Linux is in the real world and yet Apple doesn't "support" Linux, nor do they even *test* their devices in the real world.
That's why connectivity broke with Linux when iOS users upgraded iOS from something as minor as iOS 7.0.0 to 7.0.1 (ask me how I know).
Apple only tests inside the walled garden, where almost all the critical vulnerabilities were because they released insecure software. What's funny is that *many* of the iOS releases are highly insecure, and Apple knows that it's insecure at the time they release it (e.g., iOS 10.x with the broadcom bugs where Apple had the fix in hand and *still* released an highly insecure release).
When you wonder why, you find out that Apple users are very happy just to have release after release after release after release after release. It makes them *feel* safe even though some of them Apple has to destroy, they're that insecure!
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no, that's not why.
connectivity broke because the driver was *not* written by apple, but instead written by a third party, who didn't do a very good job and was unable to test with an unreleased product, as is common with linux.
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He who is nospam said on Mon, 25 Dec 2017 23:30:40 -0500:

You Apple Apologists come up with the best "I didn't inhale" excuses for when Apple breaks connectivity to Linux which Apple themselves says they won't support so they don't test anything with Linux in the real world.
There's an entire thread on this topic where you got your head handed to you because you make up such silly things that it was all Linux' fault because Apple released softwaqre that broke everything and then didn't even bother to respond to their own customer's support requests - saying only that the real world is "not supported".
The only world Apple supports is inside the walled garden. That's a fact.
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Linux on the desktop/laptop is such a miniscule part of the market it isn't even a rounding error. Apple does not support Linux at all that I'm aware of. That an open source, probably untested bit of kit showed up and then quit working is what you get when you don't know what you are doing.
--
Lloyd

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He who is Lloyd said on Wed, 27 Dec 2017 16:51:43 -0600 (CST):

All the Apple Apologists (who only own walled-garden devices) make excuses for Apple's "courageous action" to not support the real world.
*Apple products have never worked in the real world.*
It's the main reason one should *never* update their iOS (other than Apple slows down your phone with subsequent iOS releases that is).

The Apple Apologists have an apology for *evertyhing*, including the fact that Apple lets the customer test their software (remember, Google projects likely finds more security bugs in iOS than does Apple!).

Hence, with every update of iOS, something breaks everywhere for millions of people because it's a known fact that Apple never tests their products with other products in the real world (aka outside the walled garden).
For Apple, the real world is "not supported".
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IOW, just some more of your bullshit.
If I were running Apple, I wouldn't support Linux. And for some very simple reasons: 1. Linux is a miniscule presence on desktop/laptop 2. Linux users tend to not buy Apple product, and actually tend to not buy any products
--
Lloyd

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He who is Lloyd said on Wed, 27 Dec 2017 17:48:11 -0600 (CST):

You live wholly ensconced inside the prison of the walled garden. I happen to live in the real world.
I own multiple iOS devices. I own Linux. Windows. Android too.
*Each iOS release breaks something in almost every one of those.*
In fact, millions of Linux users were adversely affected when Apple broke connectivity when those Apple customer's iOS devices were updated from iOS 7.0.0 to iOS 7.0.1.
*Proof that Apple never tests their products in the real world.*
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I own all of those too. Different approaches to solving the same tasks, nothing more or less. I prefer Apple gear, but I also own a Pixelbook, Surface, Nexus 5X, iPhone 7 and a slew of tablets of various flavors. You ain't nothing special, and based solely on your trolling, you ain't nothing at all.
If any Linux users were affected because a driver that was written by someone that obviously didn't have the proper knowledge or skills to do so, then shame on them for using crapware.
--
Lloyd

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He who is Lloyd said on Wed, 27 Dec 2017 20:42:04 -0600 (CST):

You have absolutely no idea of what happened with the iOS release that brazenly broke all Linux connectivity because your characterization doesn't fit the facts.
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nor do you, and it didn't.
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He who is nospam said on Thu, 28 Dec 2017 00:15:07 -0500:

C'mon nospam. You had your head handed to you on the Linux newsgroup when you last tried to make the claim that Apple didn't break Linux connectivity with the iOS 7.0.0 to iOS 7.0.1 release.
*Apple never tests any of their products in the real world.*
So, not only do you get CPU slowdowns to half the speed you paid for with each iOS release, but you also have a great chance of everything breaking in the real world.
*Even Apple admits that they don't test their products in the real world.*
You don't get your head handed to you on the iOS newsgroups because most people on the iOS newsgroups are uninformed about the real world - they live entirely imprisoned inside the luxury of the walled garden.
What's funny is that intelligent Linux posters such as Whiskers and Frank Slootweg can see right through you in your first posts - whereas the iOS gullibles fall for your sneaky semantic twists every single time.
Heh heh ... that's the biggest difference between Linux users (who live in the real world) and iOS users (who live in the walled prison garden).
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stop lying.
apple didn't break anything.
apple added new functionality that the linux driver did not support, which was eventually updated to support it.
nothing unusual about that.
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He who is nospam said on Thu, 28 Dec 2017 11:12:30 -0500:

:)
You already got your head handed to you about this on the Linux newsgroup http://tinyurlcom/alt-os-linux
You Apple apologists will deny anything Apple does that breaks connectivity outside the prison walls of the walled garden.
Never once are you correct. You'd earn an "F" in any high school class.
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nope. stop lying.
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On 12/27/2017 04:48 PM, Lloyd wrote:

You do know that OS X is Unix based and if you're a real glutton you can cross compile Linux programs on OS X and vice versa? And of course you know iOS is a derivative of OS X. Having programmed on Unix, AIX, and Linux boxes I might feel right at home on an Apple box. At least they have gotten past the Apple II days when the keyboard was missing characters that are part of the C language.
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most linux apps have already been ported to mac os x.
on the other hand, mac os x apps *cannot* be ported to linux.

probably, but there's *far* more to mac os x than the unix layer.

such as which ones?
<https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0769/4313/products/apple_ii_8e43f9b0- 53a0-406d-ab6d-fab25e3a451f_1024x1024.JPG>
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~ iirc. I'm not sure about ^.
Back in the Apple II day you did a lot more bit twiddling. I think there were either software or hardware workarounds but I remember a friend complaining about it as well as the gymnastics to get lowercase.
I went the CP/M route with the BDS C subset compiler. It was a different world and I never had an Apple II or worked with the 6502. I was in the Intel/Zilog camp. I really liked the 68000 when it came along rather than Intel's kludge but nobody was paying me to write for Apple or 68000.
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