Sawstop's suit against Ryobi is upheld

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RicodJour wrote:

I said it "might" be as simple as clipping a couple of wires. Defeating the saw stop may require buying an add-on electronic module or maybe just removing the whole mechanism.

And how does that conversation differ from one that would take place after the owner removes the blade guard/splitter? Removing blade guards is quite common; I've never seen a table saw in use (or for sale on Craigslist) that had it's blade guard in place.
My impression is that neither conversation would take place because the saw owner realizes the cause of the injury is entirely his.
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Sure - that's possible!
It's also possible that someone could read the manual and then they'd know how to put the SawStop into bypass mode without having to do something stupid.
R
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On 10/9/2011 7:20 AM, HeyBub wrote:

That is pretty rich and explains your non founded hard on against SawStop. You want to buy a premium saw and disable it's best feature.
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No, no, no. You misunderstand him. He does not want to _buy_ a premium saw, he just wants to bitch about it. ;)
R
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Leon wrote:

SawStop turns even an economy saw into a "premium priced" saw.
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On 10/9/2011 4:52 PM, HeyBub wrote:

That is why you would disable the safety feature???
And as far as whether you consider it a premium priced saw or not, I don't think it does. That is strictly a personal preference call. If you don't want to spend the money, buy a used saw or buy the saw you want now in the event that this is required in the future. Or wait and see.
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Leon wrote:

No, I would avoid it altogether.

Answer me this: Wouldn't a sliding table result in the same number - or close thereto - of reduced accidents as a SawStop?
How many manufacturers provide a crosscut for their economy saws - even at extra cost?
Here's one for a Delta that costs as much as a SawStop (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Or, you can build your own for ten bucks http://www.thewoodshop.20m.com/howto_crosscut.htm
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On 10/10/2011 8:19 AM, HeyBub wrote:

No! You can still easily cut yourself with a sliding table. The point of the SawStop is to prevent an accident when you do something stupid. A sled does not prevent you from doing something stupid.

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Leon wrote:

A table saw sled encourages you to keep your fingers away from the blade - and still make the desired cut.
But you may be right. I suspect the majority of injuries occur when ripping a (narrow) board. Sleds don't work for squat when ripping.
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On 10/11/2011 11:33 AM, HeyBub wrote:

You might be surprised how many injuries happen when not even cutting wood... I know I was. ;~(
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In article <96f14d97-209a-447b-ae85-7b4e74593ca6

Rumour has it that there's a key to prevent false positives whilst sawing wet wood.
...and there are reported power fluctuations that trip the mechanism.
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says...

There's a button. Clipping wires won't replicate its function.

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On 10/8/2011 3:18 PM, HeyBub wrote:

Contact SawStop and ask them how many false stops that they have not helped the owner out with. From what I have always heard by those that had a story to go with the situation, SawStop always provided the replacement parts.
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Do they fork over $125 for a new blade, too?
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On 10/8/2011 7:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Not sure but I recall some one saying that one must take responsibility for ones mistakes.
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wrote:

If those were false positives, then SawStop is the responsible party. But just try to get blood out of a gilded turnip.
-- The most decisive actions of our life - I mean those that are most likely to decide the whole course of our future - are, more often than not, unconsidered. -- Andre Gide
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Mistake? We were talking about a false-trip. The "mistake" is the SawStop's.
...or are you talking about the mistake being buying a SawStop? ;-)
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On 10/9/2011 10:27 AM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I am thinking more in lines of, what if whose fault it cannot be proven one way or the other. Perhaps the blade was touched and it was not actually a false trip. It is not uncommon for a manufacturer to give the customer the benefit of the doubt and replace parts but not accessories.
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In that case, how can it *ever* be proven, short of blood dripping off the mechanism.
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On 10/9/2011 4:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Consider the fact that you CAN touch the spinning blade and set off the trigger and you can touch the spinning blade with out harm on regular saw. If you touch the mid side of the blade there are no teeth. There are no guarantees either way but it is in Sawstops best interest to assist in questionable incidents but not take full responsibility. Personally I don't know if they have replaced the blades in the past or not but the early owners that were having false triggers were happily reporting the participating by Sawstop to remedy the situation. They seemed content with the steps taken by Sawstop.
Until you own the product you really can't piss and moan about what might or might not be a fact about their customer service after the sale. By all indicators that I have read a vast majority of the owners are more than satisfied.
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