New drivers

Are they all taught to stand on the foot brake when they come to a stop in traffic, instead of using the hand brake and are they not taught to use the gear box for slowing down, so they are in the right gear at all times?
Dave
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On 05/10/2011 20:46, Dave wrote:

Guess this is a rhetorical question ;) Don't know about the former but the latter, yes according to driving instructor mate.
Lee
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By which I meant engine braking is now considered deprecated, apparently.
Lee
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Given that brakes are generally much much cheaper to replace than clutches these days then I'd rather use the brakes.
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On 05/10/2011 21:10, airsmoothed wrote:

That is pretty much what my driving instructor told me many years ago. Using the brakes also has the advantage that the brake lights warn the driver behind that you are slowing down, which using the gears does not.
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On Wed, 05 Oct 2011 22:06:45 +0100, Gareth wrote:

Brake lights indicate that red lights are on, nothing else (same as 'indicators' - often left on or counter to the change of direction). Slowing down on the clutch gives a proportional and infallible indication of acceleration.
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On Wed, 5 Oct 2011 13:10:20 -0700 (PDT), airsmoothed wrote:

The clutch only wears when it's slipping. Unless you are riding the clutch it won't be slipping... Fully pressed doesn't wear it either.
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Cheers
Dave.




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No, it just screws the release bearing :D
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On Wed, 05 Oct 2011 23:36:05 +0100 (BST), "Dave Liquorice"
Now in the good old days of carbon clutch release bearings..........
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I suggest you learn to drive.

Precisely.
Although it does wear the release bearing.
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wrote:

You won't find any high performance driver using the engine to brake, I suppose they need to learn to drive too.

It would have to be very precise not to have additional wear on the drive train. Even a small difference in road speed to engine speed will wear the plates and the synchromesh with each additional gear change. I suggest you learn how stuff works.

Fully pressed does wear the plates as there is no such thing as a completely disengaged clutch, the friction between the plates may not be enough to move the car but it will wear, slowly.
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[Snip]

ah well, I've so far got 103,000 miles out my current clutch and over 110,000 on a previous car and I use the gears box as well as brakes for slowing down, particularly before a corner.
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From KT24

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charles wrote:

Dennis is on form today. Ever statement he has made is completely wrong.
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dennis@home wrote:

wrong..they are the one type that regularly does.

wrong as usual.
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Wrong. No performance driver ever engine brakes.

Indeed.
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On 06/10/2011 14:33, Huge wrote:

ISTR comments about one F1 driver nursing it home recently doing such things, but that was very much an exception.
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Well, quite.
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Huge wrote:

nursing is an exception, but not using the engine as part of braking.
if you watch ANY race with in car cameras you can hear the engine note..NEVER is it 'coasting in neutral'- in fact neutral is very hard to find on a paddle shift.
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Clive George wrote:

I am aghast..
They *always* use the engine as part of the braking.
The aero does more, the brakes do still more.
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Huge wrote:

suggest you watch an F1 race.
how DO you think they charge the KERS?
How DO you think they are already on the throttle mid corner as well.
Engine marking is part of the package. You always change down to keep revs in the max power band whilst braking as well.
Same goes for anyone really trying in a road car.

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