I need a swivel or bearing for a lazy susan style turntable.

Page 1 of 4  

I can't find anything to solve my problem because I obviously don't know how to explain my problem. I want the be able to spin by hand a heavy 24" round turntable on top of my workbench using centrifugal force. Like the wheel on a car but horizontal.
I was going to make it out of 4 inches of MDF but I can't find a bearing or swivel or anything that will allow this top spin horizontally. Lazy susans are strong and stable but don't allow a friction free spin.
I'm sure what I need is out there but I have no idea what it is, or what it's called.
There are all sorts of bearing to spin stuff vertically, isn't there one I can attach to this table that doesn't cost hundreds of dollars.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@address.invalid wrote in

Larry Jaques suggested that this was very similar to a potter's kick wheel. Try a pottery (ceramics) supply house.
In a former life, a long time ago, I could slam 25+ lbs of stoneware clay on a wheel head, and throw very large vessels, which were almost impossible to fire successfully. The hardware held up, though.
http://www.leslieceramics.com /
These folks were the best in my area.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Kicking a wheel on top of a 36" work bench could be tough. I'm just not that limber any more.:) I need something that can rest on the bench, not the floor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@address.invalid wrote in

Sorry, I wasn't clear. I was under the impression you were looking for bearings that could handle both a heavy vertical load, as well as side loading. I understood that the turntable would likely be motor-driven in some manner. My thought was that the bearings used for a potter's kick wheel would be suitable, not that you actually use that configuration.
I wish you well with your quest.
Patriarch
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you can get a little metalwork done, a front car hub would be great. Tell us how much weight you want to carry. Wilson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@address.invalid wrote:

I checked Lee Valley. Load capacity 100 lbs. on the largest Lazy Susan. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pD042&cat=1,250,43298,43316
They use roller bearings. Since I was going to suggest this was a roller bearing application anyway it seems like a good fit... If these are high quality they should be low friction. Maybe they would work...
Force is acting downward when stopped and mostly horizontal when rotating.
--
Will
Occasional Techno-geek
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WillR wrote:

That was _1000 lbs._ capacity on the largest -- sorry! Please explain why this would not work. Then maybe people will understand the problem better.
--
Will
Occasional Techno-geek
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WillR wrote: ...

The gravity load doesn't behave any different whether it's spinning or not...
To OP, what you're application calls for is a "thrust bearing". Lazy susans or rotating TV, etc., stands are commercially available for 100+ lbs. The large under-counter one Dad and I built for Mom some 30 years ago now, used the thrust bearings from a small disc--3/4" shaft available from a good farm implement supply. What their actual load rating is I'm not sure, but it would easily hold 250-300 lb, I'm sure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1000 pounds and ball bearings.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Lazy susans are not designed for horizontal forces and LV has suggested against it. They are designed to turn, not spin. I need something like a utility trailer wheel support only horizontal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@address.invalid wrote:

Since the lazy Susan has a race of ball bearings it will handle side forces. I checked that. Besides. after doing a quick mental design and realizing it would be a lazy Susan anyway... I checked Lee Valley and the design they stock is exactly what I would have built anyway -- maybe with larger bearings -- but you are not moving that much weight...
What the heck -- other than the air bearing surface suggested by Robatoy, nothing obvious now comes to mind. And BTW -- I use an air baring surface on the side of my table saw. It is quite effective for heavy sheets of MDF -- saves having to get help to saw large sheets..
Have fun.
--
Will
Occasional Techno-geek
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Weight is about 100 pounds max. I'm thinking the wheel axle off a utility trailer would be a better way to go. But I have to find one first.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 14:21:35 -0400, WillR

I've never seen a Lazy Susan that would handle side loads. They're a simple thrust bearing with pressed steel races. There's no sideways location of the two races, so any sideload tends to lift the upper race off the balls and then shift the two races relative to each other, jamming them.
It's not a good practice to put a sideload through any pure thrust thrust bearing,. But if you must do it, use one with deep races, not the cheapest of pressed races.
If you have space, the easiest solution is a car hub. They're enormously over-engineered for this task, so you can simply ignore the direction of the applied thrust.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@address.invalid says...

You could just get some car (or truck) bearings from any auto parts store. They are cone bearings that support the spin in both directions. A few dollars is all they cost. Still, I think the lazy susan bearings would work very well. If your disc is centered and reasonably balanced, there will be no horizontal forces worth worrying about. Since the disc is symmetrical, the centrifugal forces cancel out and all you have left is gravity. Believe it or not, it's true.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hax Planks wrote:

Assuming it's balanced and he doesn't apply any side force.
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke says...

The lazy susan bearing will tolerate some side force. I just don't think he will have a problem with it since the disk isn't that big or heavy. He said he had a 12" LS bearing. That should be massive overkill for his purposes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That was my first choice, but I couldn't figure out how to attach the bearing to the table. You need a bit of the axle for the bearing seat.

I'll try the bearing even though LV said it was not a good choice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@address.invalid wrote:

The disc thrust bearing will hold all you need and more...they're quite common.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@address.invalid wrote:

If I understand your problem correctly, you're concerned that a lazy susan bearing won't take side thrust and may not stand up to continuous high-speed use.
How about splitting the problem into two parts -- use 3 or 4 skateboard bearings mounted around the edge of the turntable to carry the weight, use another 1 or 2 on the axle to take the side thrust.
--
GH

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 09 Apr 2005 23:10:28 -0700, the inscrutable snipped-for-privacy@address.invalid spake:

Give us more info. What are you making? Will any forces be at work, such as a cutting tool or shaping forces from the side? What weight will be on the table? How much external force will be applied?

Hmm, lazy susans don't don't much force to spin, even with 200# on 'em.
For a close-to-friction-free unit, mount a cut-off truck axle (with bearing and wheel) to a metal frame and put an MDF (or real wood) top on it.
--
STOP LIVING LIKE VEAL
-----------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.