Competition for SawStop ?

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Whyfor art thou quoting moi?
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wrote in message

Sorry about that Rob. Inacurate snipping. got the wrong Canadian. :)
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OK, I'll go with the SawStop. Now we are going to shove our hands up under the guard as fast as we can like we are playing hand ball. We'll see who has the bigger cut. Better yet, you can do yours with your saw turned off, I'll let the SawStop run to give you an advantage, maybe.
IIRC the Whirlwind blade simply stops, the speed of your hand will probably produce a pretty good cut when it hits that stationary blade. The SawStop blade of course instantly stops spinning AND drops below the table.
A- hole attorney or not, I am going with what offers ME the most protection.
The Whirlwind will make all of this type technology become more reasonably priced but so far it's a "me too" that does not offer the same amount of protection.
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On 1/21/2011 11:03 AM, Leon wrote:

I don't yet have a TS, but I intuitively keep my hands away from things spinning at 4000 RPM. A normal blade guard appears to offer "good" protection. I will increase my level of protection when it's cost is more modest. Until then I will exercise due caution--like I do when I use my chain saw. Seems like a chain saw is more dangerous, no? At least the TS blade is fixed in 2 dimensions. I am watching the technology, and this discussion, with interest.
Bill
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A good point of view to have BUT you may eventually progress past cutting 2x4's and start to build more complicated/detailed projects. You may need to cut smaller pieces. There comes a point where a standard blade guard becomes a problem because of it's inherent design. You have heard of kick back, a piece gets trapped between a stationary object, usually the fence, and the spinning blade. The guard is a stationary object and small cut off pieces can and do get trapped up inside the guard and the spinning blade. Some what like a bullet the piece gets thown out. Bigger pieces can shoot out the side of the guard if trapped under and the guard is setting on top of the waste piece. IMHO it is a "blade guard" not a person guard. It does a good job at keeping things from falling on and damaging the blade. Yes I have been hit by small pieces while using the blade guard, don't recall small pieces setting free on the table top ever getting caught and thrown.
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On 1/21/2011 1:33 PM, Leon wrote:

Just curious, does anyone else share this experience/point of view--that blade guards are unsafe due to a greater likelihood of small pieces being thrown?
Bill
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During certain types of cuts, the blade guard can make things more dangerous. For example, cuts that do not have enough of an offcut to support the blade guard on the off cut side. Once the cut is complete, there's a piece trapped between the guard and blade. Even worse if the offcut is trapped between antikickback pawls and the blade.
With every safety device, there's operations that it makes safer and operations it makes more dangerous. It doesn't mean the device is useless, it just means it needs to be removed for certain operations.
Puckdropper
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Yes, and it forces you to use unsafe proceders.
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CW wrote:

This almost like a good place to ask a question which has been on my mind. According to Grizzly's web site, Grizzly G0690 runs 4300 RPM, Grizzly 1023RL runs 3450 RPM. Both are 3 HP. Is the higher speed better for cutting "sheet goods", cutting faster, or just hurling small pieces further? Although I've interjected a bit of humor, this is a serious question. To keep it on topic, neither of these saws are currently using SawStop's technology, but I think I would consider it an advantage if they did.
Bill
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Assuming the same chip load and same number of teeth on the blade the faster blade will cut faster.
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The faster RPM will equate to a faster and smoother cut. BUT it can also equate to a burned cut if feed rate is slower than average.
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Just my humble opinion here... ummm, yah! By an order of magnitude, probably.

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wrote:

I'd like to see the engineering figures on just what that extra 114 milliseconds of time means in the travel of the blade.
What we still don't know, however, is the result of a high-speed hand into a Sawstop machine. That should have been one of his selling points...unless it renders the mechanism somewhat useless. That's my guess, anyway.
But even if I had the money for a new Sawstop, I don't think I'd buy one because of the principle. I don't want to knowingly feed greed and arrogance, wherever they exist, if I can possibly help it.
-- Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air... -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
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And *I* wouldn't buy one because when the time comes that my common sense, agility, and attention to safety factors are so badly deteriorated that I feel the need for the device I will discontinue using a table saw.
Max
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On 1/21/11 1:28 PM, Max wrote:

Yeah, because no one has ever followed safety procedures and still gotten injured.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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I'm a one man shop, Mike. I can't speak for anyone but myself. I bought my first table saw in 1968. I have a very close relationship with my body parts so I don't treat them recklessly. I'm highly satisfied with the table saw I have and I can't see replacing it with one that just might out of some rare and unfortunate confluence of circumstances, significantly damage itself. YMMV. Please be careful.
Max
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On 1/21/11 5:35 PM, Max wrote:

No one trying to convince you to replace it. But to say or imply that you won't ever get hurt if you just follow safety procedures is nonsense.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Most of us never plan our accidents. It would be an oxymorin
Most of the saw accidents I have heard of get the fingers on a knee-jerk reaction to a sudden event...like kickback or pieces flying and the human overreacts pulling their baby finger and next one past the blade backwards.
http://tablesawaccidents.com/table-saw-injury-pictures.htm
Saw guards are hardly ever there when needed except for safety checks.
And *I* wouldn't buy one because when the time comes that my common sense, agility, and attention to safety factors are so badly deteriorated that I feel the need for the device I will discontinue using a table saw.
Max
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wrote

Max, you are already there if you really believe that common sense, agiaity, and or attention to safety factors will protect you. There will be new safety rules written in the future for the accidents that are less common and of which you have not yet heard about. Imagine my suprise 22 years ago when I thought and worked the same way and cut half my left thumb off and the TS was not turned on. I still have not seen a safety rule written to prevent the accident that I had.
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wrote

When you are done with a cut, crank the blade down below table height.
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