Black and Decker Bandsaw 9411 Type I

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To start off I realize it is a cheap saw and I could do better, but for $25 I thought it was a good deal to work a bandsaw into my needs in woodworking.
Question: I picked it up at a yard sale with three blades for $25, and thought it would be a good starter bandsaw. I brought it home and downloaded all of the manual and parts list. I spent most of Monday cleaning it up. (Though it was obviously well maintained but not used for a long time. Mud Wasp nest under the table and in the knobs gave that away.)
Based on the manual I adjusted the alignment, and turned it on. I think it works perfectly. I did some play cuts, and noticed that it appeared to burn the wood slightly when I cut curves. Since I did not smell any burning I thought there may be a little rust on the blade.
Me question is a slight burning on the curves normal with this type of bandsaw, or is it something I am doing.
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Are you exceeding the minimum turning radius? http://www.old-woodworking-tools.net/band-saw-blade.html Art
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On 3/28/2012 9:17 PM, Artemus wrote:

However the answer to your question based on the information on that site is "No, I did not try to do a greater radius than is capable of the blade".
Never having used a bandsaw I cut conservative curves with radius of 2" to 3" vs what is recommended on that site for a 3/8" blade of 1" to 1 1/4". In fact it is a surprise to me that a 3/8" blade is capable of a 1" radius.
As I said I am new to this toy.
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Keith Nuttle wrote:

Next (obvious) thing: Is the blade sharp?
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On 3/28/2012 9:35 PM, Bill wrote:

In the few cuts I have made it seems to cut OK.
Would a dull blade cause burning.
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Keith Nuttle wrote:

Anything that impedes the cutting could. That includes a blade that is dull, too wide, too many TPI, too little tooth set, type of wood, etc.
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in a larger minimum turning radius. A new blade may be in order. Be sure your guide blocks are adjusted behind the teeth of the blade or you could ruin it instantly. Art
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(And installed in the right direction?) <gd&r>
-- "When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty." - Thomas Jefferson
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What about the back of the blade? Is it square or rounded?
The books I read suggested rounding the back of the blade with a stone to make it easier to cut curves.
Puckdropper
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Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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Puckdropper wrote:

He can work onthe old blade if he wants while he's trying a new blade! : )

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On Thu, 29 Mar 2012 04:41:34 +0000, Puckdropper wrote:

Not only that, it often reduces the drift.
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On Thu, 29 Mar 2012 16:13:00 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard

Is this something that is already done for you on quality blades or is it something that should be done by every band saw owner?
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The Woodslicer and Woodturner blades from Highland Hardware both had rounded backs when I got them.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 3/28/2012 6:50 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

I bought that saw new about 30 years ago, I think I paid about $80. I would say that yours is probably a least 25 years old. Yours was well maintained most likely because it was probably never used very much. Mine was not. Any way IIRC the blade guides were not the typically expected material. Burning from the blade can be caused by exceeding the radius that the blade was designed for. The set in the teeth and width of the blade pretty much dictate the radius that it is capable of cutting with out burning. The distance from the back corner of the blade to the outer most cutting point of the blade on the opposite side is what determines the smallest possible radius. With the same width blade but with greater or less set in the teeth you will get a greater or less amount of tight radius capacity. Basically once the back corner of the blade starts to touch the wood you run the risk of burning the wood. FWIW this saw was marginal when brand new, I never ever used mine past setting it up that I recall. IMHO the saw is best used for 1/4" soft material and or balsa.
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What no one seems to have mentioned is :
How fast you are moving the wood. If you are moving too slow it can burn. There is a proper feed rate for a band saw. Too slow the wood is in contact with the blade too long. To fast and you will bog the unit down, or you can bind, or snap a small blade.
The type of wood, both pine and cherry burn more quickly.
On 3/28/2012 7:50 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

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On 3/29/2012 8:51 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

If you are using a crap blade, otherwise the kerf should be wider than the body of the blade.
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Not necessarily on a curve. On a straight yes, but on a curve the blade body could easily be hitting the wood.
On 3/29/2012 11:09 AM, Leon wrote:

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No. Such a thing has never been made before. Art
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On 3/29/2012 9:51 AM, tiredofspam wrote:

Thank everyone who has helped me with my new "toy".
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On Wednesday, March 28, 2012 6:50:45 PM UTC-5, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrot e:

ing. Question: I picked it up at a yard sale with three blades for $25, and thought it would be a good starter bandsaw. I brought it home and download ed all of the manual and parts list. I spent most of Monday cleaning it up. (Though it was obviously well maintained but not used for a long time. Mud Wasp nest under the table and in the knobs gave that away.) Based on the m anual I adjusted the alignment, and turned it on. I think it works perfectl y. I did some play cuts, and noticed that it appeared to burn the wood slig htly when I cut curves. Since I did not smell any burning I thought there m ay be a little rust on the blade. Me question is a slight burning on the cu rves normal with this type of bandsaw, or is it something I am doing.
I have this model and can NOT keep and thin (3/16" wide blade on the saw? It keep jumping off the wheels?
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