Square D electrical panel question

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Why are you so far behind us with wires? Ours have been underground for many decades. Only the national grid at 330,000 volts is overground.
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How come the dove gets to be the peace symbol? How about the pillow? It has more feathers than the dove, and it doesn't have that dangerous beak!

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I think a lot is just tradition. The assumption was that overhead wires were easier to maintain. Now they are starting to figure out that there is not that much maintenance necessary if they are buried. Most new installation is underground but we still have millions of miles on poles. They have the thought that if it ain't broke, don't fix it.
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Actually FPL has done tests that show a wire, a meter down can be destroyed by lightning and we get a lot of lightning.
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And you think a wire in the air is safer?!?
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If it is hit, actually it is. The dirt/sand around a buried conductor can cause physical damage. Underground hits are pretty rare tho. Overhead hits happen a lot but it usually just blows a fuse. Occasionally a transformer can explode tho.
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On 2016-03-15 7:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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Froz...

Quando omni flunkus, moritati
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<http://nlcs1.nlc.state.ne.us/docs/pilot/pubs/storm1976.pdf of damage from an ice storm in Nebraska back in 1976. Nebraska is a bit north of the center of the continental U.S. The power companies were using helicopters to haul the towers to the fields and set them in place. The towers were built at old WWII airfields. The storm hit in the spring so the fields were thawing and there was the usual spring moisture to contend with.
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Can't get that to load in Opera or IE.

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Ah, this explains how they happen - warmer air higher up. But what I want to know is, surely if the warm air is moving to the right, then everything will melt soon anyway? And why do they happen in America and not the UK?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_storm#/media/File:Precipitation_by_type.png
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The freezing rain will often be accompanied by a cold front that brings in snow and much cooler weather. The storm I linked to earlier brought about six or eight inches of snow if I recall correctly. The snow will keep things cooler just because it reflects sunlight. I remember a snow that ended about 50 miles west of me. It was consistently about 10 F. cooler there until the snow melted.
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Never happens in the UK, maybe you need more land mass?
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You have that backward, your weather is very temperate because you live on a fairly small island surrounded by water and no real mountains. There is not much there to vary your weather. It you just chose one state in the US, Arizona, (itself larger than all of UK, including Ireland) you would have deserts where the temperature is well over 50-55c and mountains 4 times the height of your "Highlands" where -30-40c is not uncommon. When you have the jet stream sweeping over a 3000 mile land mass, the weather is a lot more variable than a place where the wind is coming across 3000 miles of somewhat stable ocean water temperatures. Then you get down where I am and the weather is tropical, a whole different breed of cat. Hurricanes and tornadoes get most of the attention but the typical summer thunderstorm still scares most European tourists. They tend not to be here in the summer tho. Tourist visas are only good for 6 months and most choose the winter months.
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I wasn't backward, you just misunderstood it as I was too brief. What I meant was "Storms like that never happen in the UK, maybe we need more land mass for severe weather?", not "You need more land mass to stop it happening".
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On Mon, 7 Mar 2016 18:27:49 -0800 (PST), Uncle Monster

it'll be +20 on Thursday, like it was a couple weeks ago. A couple years ago it went from "25 or 26C back down to -15 or so within a week in March.
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According to Yahoo answers:
The greatest temperature change in 24 hours occurred in Loma, MT. on January 15, 1972. The temperature rose exactly 103 degrees, from -54 degrees Fahrenheit to 49 degrees. This is the world record for a 24—hour temperature change.
Other Extreme Temperature Changes
In 24 hours: 100°F, Browing, MT, Jan 23–24, 1916, from 44°F to –56°F.
In 12 hours: 84°F, Fairfield, MT, Dec 24, 1924, from 63°F at noon to –21°F at midnight.
In 2 hours: 62°F, Rapid City, SD, Jan 12, 1911, from 49°F at 6 AM to –13°F at 8 AM
In 27 minutes: 58°F, Spearfish, SD, Jan 22, 1943, from 54°F at 9 AM to –4°F at 9:27 AM
In 15 minutes: 47°F, Rapid City, SD, Jan 10, 1911, from 55°F at 7 AM to 8°F at 7:15 AM
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wrote:

shortly after noon - great Chinook!!
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Nobody needs a coat. Humans are warm blooded.
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On 3/12/2016 1:10 PM, Mr Macaw wrote:

And because we're warm blooded we get cold when the temps drop. Many people don't like being cold, and while we don't need a coat, it's a good idea to add additional clothing so we don't freeze.
Do you have a coat, or do you layer?
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On 3/12/2016 2:37 PM, Muggles wrote:

And did you put your ground cable on the ground, or the neutral bar?
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On 12/03/2016 21:21, Stormin Mormon wrote:

station (I think).
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