R. Cott. 12

First fix wiring started.
Now the plaster board and insulation.
The original house has a plastic moisture barrier between warm space and cold lofts. When I ran the necessity of repeating this for the new bits by the architect he said things have moved on and that it is no longer required. He did agree that foil backed PB would be a good thing.
Any thoughts bearing in mind comments from earlier threads.
Also.. has anyone used a thermal store rather than a megaflow. Plumbing and inspection issues?
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Tim Lamb

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On Thu, 12 Jan 2017 21:51:15 +0000, Tim Lamb
Not so go for WiFi though (especially on internal walls / ceilings).
I was asked to help a mate who had built a study into the garage on the front of their house and he used foil backed PB. BT put the wireless router into the new study and he asked me to explain why the kids couldn't get a reliable signal in the lounge some 2 meters away.
I suggested he got some Powerline adaptors to export the LAN outside his new Faraday cage and they seemed to do the job ok. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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Huh! Building Control want chicken wire (fire reasons, lets me get away with 12.5mm ceiling plasterboard) supporting the inter joist insulation.

OK Here. No radio hams to annoy:-)
I will have similar issues: the router at one end and the lounge upstairs at the other. I am hoping someone will give a words of few syllables instruction how to migrate the wi-fi using ethernet cable:-)
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On Thu, 12 Jan 2017 23:22:12 +0000, Tim Lamb

If you still have the opportunity to flood wire R.C. with whatever the best spec Ethernet cable is (Cat5/6?) then you could put Access Points at whatever locations are appropriate.
Or Wireless Powerline adaptors if you don't want to run the cable and want something more 'portable'.
Summat like: TP-LINK TL-WPA4220TKIT AV600 (1 wired master, two wireless (+wired) slaves). With a wireless router that would give you 3 Wireless access points and if you put them all on the same SSID, it would become one big wireless network (I believe the TP-Link units allow you to set up the WiFi units using WPS (press button).
Cheers, T i m
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Not exactly words of one syllable Tim:-)
It would be nice to avoid multiple access codes for visitors needing connection but then moving elsewhere in the house.
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On Fri, 13 Jan 2017 10:23:27 +0000, Tim Lamb

;-)

That's the good things about setting all the access points with the same SSID (Wireless network name) and password (that applies if you use Ethernet wired Access Points or Powerline ones).
However, I don't think there is normally the same level of intelligence as with say Cellular Telephones where the link will 'hop' to a stronger signal if it senses one available. So, if say you made the first wireless connection to the Router and then walked to another room with another access point on the exact same network, I don't think it would use that (stronger signal) till the connection to the first one broke.
Cheers, T i m
p.s. Windows gives you the ability to prioritise the order of the network connections (so you set the one you are most likely to be nearest at the top of the list) but not sure you can do that with other OS's (FWIW etc).
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T i m wrote:

Yeah, some drivers have a threshold you can lower that will make them tend to roam rather than cling like grim death to a weak signal.
It's one of the reasons why businesses tend towards a controller for multiple wifi points, the controller can tell that a given device is using the "wrong" access point for the location it is in, and kick it off, so the device will then connect to a better access point.
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wrote:

Interesting.

Makes sense.
Cheers, T i m
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Run a few cables while you have the opportunity with walls down, floorboards up, etc.
Run twice as many as you think you need, i.e. if you think you'll need an ethernet point at one location, run two cables to it. You need not use both now, but will be glad of it at some point in the future, and it's easier and cheaper to do it now than later.
Consider running cables to points even if you think they will not be needed now (change of room use, room re-organisation, etc.)
Use Cat5e or Cat6 cable, and make sure you get all-copper, not CCS or CCA (copper-coated steel, aluminium).
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OK Mike. Points taken.

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OK Mike. I have 100m of Cat 6 ordered and will lay in runs from the telephone intake point to likely outlet needs. From a point of near ignorance, what terminations are used?

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On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 09:06:15 +0000, Tim Lamb

As an aside, is that the best place to have the centre of your wiring? Eg, if it's in the hall, so you want the router, possibly an Ethernet switch and all the cables in the hall by your front door? An alternative is you can put all your 'comms' in a cupboard somewhere and then just run a cable or two between where the router might sit (say a couple of places) and said comms space or get the BT line / Cable fed into there as well.
I have done just that with / for several people and it worked out very well.

Although many people crimp plugs directly to the ends of the cable, said cable should be solid copper (not stranded) and so is *supposed* to be punched-down into a box ('Krone') or patch panel, and from there you would take flexible cable to your router / switch / PC etc.
You can get SOHO RJ45 patch panels (make sure they are for Cat6) and surface mount or flush, single or double RJ45 wall boxes
http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/twin-cat6-rj45-outlet-kit-white-n80jh
and although you can get disposable punch down tools, proper ones are pretty cheap.
<https://adeptnetworks.co.uk/krone-type-punch-down-tool
If you insist on putting crimp-on RJ45 connectors on the end of solid cables I believe you can get some plugs that are suited to that (but I prefer to do it properly). ;-)
http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/maplin-cat-6-solid-rj45-connectors-10-pack-n20ch
http://www.ebay.co.uk/gds/Solid-vs-Stranded-Network-Cabling-Which-to-choose-/10000000002065324/g.html
You will also need a crimp tool of course.
Plus, it's quite easy to arrange and connect the wires correctly in the punch-down connectors and easier to buy patch cables for the ends from the likes of eBay than making them!
<http://www.cablemonkey.co.uk/2987-cat6-data-outlets <https://adeptnetworks.co.uk/10-soho-12-port-cat-6-patch-panel
Cheers, T i m
p.s. Links offered as examples of the gear used, not as a suggestion as to where to get them etc.
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The intake point, router and my PC will all be in the study which has a window overlooking the farmyard. Open Reach strongly advised keeping the intake/router cable short. (We have had the discussion on negligible effect:-)

OK Ta.
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wrote:

I think I met a slightly more sensible Openreach engineer, who said that extending from the master socket to the router would be fine *providing* it was done in Cat5/6 cable. So I extended the split outputs of the master socket (phones and internet) via a double wall socket by the BT socket, about 15M of cat 5e cable, and a patch panel, and thence to the router, and there is no visible performance difference to having the router right next to the master socket. It also puts the router in the centre of the house at ceiling level, which helps with wi-fi coverage.
Are you going to use all these new cables for wired phones too? Or are wired phones so last century!
Charles F
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On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 12:37:53 -0000, "Charles F"

Was the right answer. ;-)
Well, I'm not sure if the 'std' twisted pair telephone cable is Cat5 or whatever but as long as you extend it the last few meters using something suitable (eg, not alarm wire) then it shouldn't have much impact over the several km it has already taken to get to you. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On Sat, 14 Jan 2017 13:19:35 +0000, T i m wrote:

Although indoors is a pretty noisy environment electrically, so probably worth using reasonable cable even if only a few metres.
My master socket is less than 1 metre from the router, so I use the cable that came with the router!
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Quite. I have replaced (mainly in the early days) quite a few telephone extension cables (used to put the router somewhere more convenient (and even with dial-up modems before that)) with twisted pair cables and it can make a big difference.

Yeah, handy that. ;-)
I'm on cable so just ran some CT100 in myself so they (CableTel at the time > NTL > VM) just connected into that.
I use my VM supplied WiFi router as just a cable modem and have my main router elsewhere in any case (and next to my fully occupied 16 port Gb switch). ;-)
Talking of cable, initially this place had Thin Ethernet (the 4Mb/s Token ring, AppleTalk and ArcNet was only in my workshop <g>) then Cat3 and some of that is still in use. ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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wrote:

It isnt normally several km with VDSL2 tho.
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There was a modest improvement here but difficult to be sure. Possibly better locations for filters.

There will be two other wired phones. I don't want a flock of visitors trecking to the office to see if there are any messages.
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When we upgraded to VDSL, I originally moved the router to be close to the master socket, which was very inconvenient as a) the wifi coverage throughout the house was less strong, and b) I had to use Homeplug to get an Ethernet feed to my PC upstairs.
So I experimented...
- best sync speed was with the router in the test socket of the master socket
- sync speed reduced by a couple of Mbps when I connected the house wiring and put the router in the front plate of the master socket
- with the router upstairs on the end of a long run of BT cable to the upstairs socket and then another long run of cheap ribbon phone extension cable (under doorways and along the edge of carpet) from there to the router in the next room, I lost a further few Mbps
I think the difference between best and worse was 20 Mbps down to 14 Mbps, which I decided was tolerable if it gave me the router next to the PC and upstairs for better wifi.
Interestingly, I've just looked at my router now and it's syncing at 20 Mbps / 7 Mbps - better than it used to be - so I'm dead chuffed. Actually the biggest benefit of VDSL for me is the dramatically increased upload speed (0.5 up to 7 Mbps) when sending emails or ftping files; the increased download speed isn't normally very noticeable (because even the 8 Mbps of ADSL was fast enough) for ordinary web access, though it does come in very useful for downloading large files.
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