Electrical socket from light switch for cctv.

The OP asked about a CCTV socket off a light switch, not off a lighting circuit. Admittedly, a bit of ambiguity there. If he means "use a light switch to turn the power socket on and off", then, yes, it's allowable as long as the circuit is /supplied/ from a power circuit and the circuit is protected by a 5A fuse/etc upstream from the switch.
Eg: ring main-->5A Fused Spur---->5A "light" switch--->CCTV socket
I have exactly the same arrangement in my roofspace with "cctv" replaced with "light".
If the OP means "can I take power from a lighting circuit", the answer is a clear "no".
JGH
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How do your light bulbs work if they don't consume power?
Tim
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Gazz wrote:

All the CCTV I fit uses CAT5 cable.
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On Saturday, November 17, 2012 12:56:53 AM UTC, malcolmf wrote:

Its fine to connect it to a lighting circuit using a shuttered 2A or 5A round pin socket, or an FCU, but not a 13A socket.
NT
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snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

Not even a 13A socket that is labelled CCTV ONLY?
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On Saturday, November 17, 2012 6:18:34 PM UTC, snipped-for-privacy@blueyonder.co.uk wrote:

I didn't think that was regs compliant. Plugging normal loads in would result in circuit overload.
NT
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Considering most lighting circuits are in 1.5mm T+E, the cable can run 13 amps continuous if it is on a plasterboard ceiling, covered by thermal insulation. A change from 6A to 10A CB would suffice if the 6A was likely to be exceeded, and still gives a big margin for safety of the cable.
Apart from some heaters and other large current eaters, lighting circuits would be quite capable of carrying a number of socket outlets if they were marked for low wattage appliances. It is common for extractor fans and TV boosters/Sky boxes to run from the lighting circuit in an attic.
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On Sunday, November 18, 2012 12:02:59 PM UTC, A.Lee wrote:

'apart from.'
Many electrical items are capable of more than the regs permit. Bell wire is a classic example.
NT
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You could probably get fencing wire to 'work' too. ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Sunday, November 18, 2012 2:36:26 PM UTC, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

That's about what they used when Victoria was still alive.
NT
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On 2012-11-18, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

That's how the electric fence was discovered, right?
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On Sun, 18 Nov 2012 03:39:44 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

The lighting fuse/MCB would then operate...
Donno what the regs say but I can't see what is wrong with a 13A socket connected to the lighting circuit via a FCU and 3A (or smaller) fuse. Everything suitably labled as well.
I think there still needs to be clarification from the OP of what he means By "Is it acceptable in the uk to put a socket for a cctv camera off of a light switch?"
Is he looking to derive a power feed from the back of a light switch direct to a socket or use a light switch as a switch to a remote socket fed from a ring main or lighting power?
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On 18/11/2012 11:39, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

I am not aware of any specific regulation that says you can't use a 13A socket on a circuit with a lower rating.
The main concern would be that a high load connected to it would cause tripping of the circuit, and that in turn may pose a risk due to loss of lighting. Hence it is required that the designer make sensible decisions. So rigging an extra socket on your landing that is fed from the lighting circuit would not be sensible - since someone is very likely to plug a vacuum cleaner into it etc. However one in the loft space intended to feed an aerial amp really poses no risk. Likewise, socket designed for powering table lamps etc would be fine on a lighting circuit - although in that circumstance using a physically incompatible socket would make sense since it will be in proximity to general purpose power sockets.
Cables on lighting circuits are usually fairly generously oversized, and the cable rating is significantly in excess of the circuit breaker. So you can't create a situation where you can overload the cable.
(a similar situation exists with a typical cooker on a 6mm^2 radial with a 32A MCB)
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More likely scenario is someone plugs in a vacuum cleaner or whatever into a lighting circuit on a dimmer, and fooks the dimmer.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

I don't know of a reg that forbids it provided that the outlet is labelled for a specific appliance.
And if someone did plug a 3kW heater in then the fuse or MCB will trip and nothing bad happens.
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On 17/11/2012 00:56, malcolmf wrote:

Powering a low current load from a lighting circuit is acceptable and often done for things like extractor fans etc.
You can install sockets as well, although it is preferable to use one of the small round pin shuttered 2 or 5A ones to prevent someone connecting high current devices to the circuit and tripping it.
However connecting to a light switch as such may be a problem since you usually only have two live wires (one switched) and no neutral.
Unless specified by the manufacturer, there is not usually any requirement for a fused connection unit (aka spur unit) since they circuit will typically be protected with a MCB that has a rating well below the current carrying capacity of the cable.
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John.

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On 17 Nov,

But an FCU with 3a fuse may be required (or at least desirable) for discrimination, to protect from loss of lighting due to plugging in an appliance of excessive rating. This is assuming that a 13a socket outlet is used to connect teh camera supply.
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On 19/11/2012 00:34, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Yes its a valid argument, although its debatable if you will actually get much discrimination with the arrangement in that order. (i.e. MCB upline of a fuse). Also if fitting a socket to a lighting circuit it will normally be for a specific purpose rather than a general socket, so the chances of accidental overload should be small.
The main argument for using a FCU etc would be for connecting a bit of fixed equipment that specifies it must be protected at 3A.
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John.

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