New electrical regulations

Stories on the BBC today (see http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4133859.stm ) about new electrical regulations saying that you won't be able to do much more DIY than replace a plug socket without some sort of approval. Anyone know any more specific details? - the links they give are a bit crap as the DTI website is immense.
I want to move a towel rail socket from the bathroom up into the loft where it will be a standard plug socket. Would that need approval? Who from?
TIA, Fred
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Fred wrote:

Part P. It's had 432 mentions in here
See http://groups-beta.google.com/group/uk.d-i-y/search?group=uk.d-i-y&q=part+p&qt_g=1&searchnow=Search+this+group
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the
where
It hasn't been defined what is regarded as what is still "allowed". Once you say minor alterations can be made such as replacing an outlet, what next, adding a spur? Does the addition of an RCD count as minor or must the inclusion of this be delayed until more major works are required. Again if including an RCD is allowed can this stretch to a consumer unit?
There are many electricians who are registering but yet have no formal qualifications. It's all a mess and all the relevant courses, as one would expect, are full for many months.
Welcome nanny state.
Fred"2"
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"Fred" wrote | It hasn't been defined what is regarded as what is still "allowed".
It has mostly, look through Building Regs and then electrical on www.odpm.gov.uk
Contrary to the impression that may be given, DIY work remains legal. What is required is that a building warrant is obtained from building control. This is exactly the same as applies to, eg, putting in replacement windows.
| There are many electricians who are registering but yet have no formal | qualifications. It's all a mess and all the relevant courses, as one | would expect, are full for many months.
They don't have to have qualifications. That's not the point. Only one person in a NICEIC registered firm has to have qualifications.
Owain
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windows.
I accept a building warrant is a proposed solution but dislike the cost or tax implication for DIYers particularly when this may postpone the fitting of a safety device.
I'm certain only a registered person is allowed to inspect and give a certificate. You are correct that anyone may carry out the actual work but only the registered person may issue the certificate and make the final connection. A bit like professionals working with gas.
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Fred wrote:

Fred -
you can be as certain as you like, and act upon your certainty.
Others will bother to read up on the facts of the new regulations, and read around a little more widely, and discover that (a) local authorities are all at sea over who can issue appropriate certs, and (b) that in fact any monkey employed by any outfit where a single employee is a member of an Appropriate Body gets their work considered Approved. Brilliant, eh?
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"Fred" wrote | > Contrary to the impression that may be given, DIY work remains legal. | > What is required is that a building warrant is obtained from building control. | > This is exactly the same as applies to, eg, putting in replacement | > windows. | I'm certain only a registered person is allowed to inspect and give a | certificate. You are correct that anyone may carry out the actual work but | only the registered person may issue the certificate and make the final | connection.
Wrong, wrong, wrong.
This has *nothing* to do with certificates for wiring.
Anyone can issue a Design/Inspection/Test certificate for electrical wiring. Preferably, they should be competent to do so (have the appropriate C&G certificate) and be covered by professional indemnity insurance.
However that certificate is irrelevant under Part P. Whether or not a certificate is issued, if the work is not carried out by a contractor who is a member of one of the self-certification organisations, then an application to Building Control under Part P of the Building Regulations must be made. Building Control will not necessarily issue a BS7671 certificate; they will issue a Building Regs approval certificate (building warrant).
| A bit like professionals working with gas.
Wrong again. Any 'professional' (i.e. in the course of business, which would usually equate to financial gain) working with gas MUST have current CORGI membership for the class of work undertaken.
Owain
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Just do it. Ignore this nonsense. Nobody will be able to prove you did anything illegal.
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the
where
try
http://www.partp.co.uk/download.asp
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