Wiring an electrical cooker

Well our old cooker packup I bought a new electrical one. A indesit
something or other :) ... arrived today oddly. unboxed it and was looking
for a plug and it appears its not wired up ready for use. Ho hum microwave
meals till I get it wired lol. you can guess how popular I am right now with
the family.
So I had a looked behind it to see whats there basically there is three
terminals one earth, positive, negative. So I guess I need some appropriate
cable a plug and a fuse and wire the ends of the new cable to the correct
terminal which has screws, so I guess you can wrap the wire around then
screw it back on ?
What kind of cable do I need ? normals 3 core cable surely that would melt
:) being a high wattage gizmo. Yip so advice on what cable I need and where
I might acquire it from appreciated.
Looks simple enough although those are my famous last words.
Any tips advice or should I get a electrican to do it, although it does look
like child play.
Thanks
Reply to
James
? ... How so ?
How hard can it be to connect 3 wires ? (I already checked, just 3 screws on connectors with corresponding wires) all I need to know what kind of wire I should use 6mm 100 etc ?
If I melt the house down or blow the kitchen up I'll get an electrician. But this does look DIY able.
Reply to
James
If it hasn't got a plug then you need a dedicated cooker circuit and the right sort of wiring. A plug will only give up to 3,000 watts. If you wish, then check the specification and let us know what the power requirements are - but if it is more than just a table top type of hotplate / warming cupboard then you need an electrician.
Do not take chances - fire could result from doing things wrong - no kidding.
Reply to
John
It *looks* like it - because you don't appreciate the issues. Get an electrician. Seriously.
Your post indicates that you don't understand the issues here.
First, the thing is of such a high load that a normal socket and plug won't work. Second, the cable isn't designed for connecting to a plug (or if it is, it isn't suitable for the load). Third, cookers usually need a dedicated circuit with its own separate protection back at the consumer unit ('fuse box', if you like).
There are various safety issues of which you are probably not aware. Get an electrician.
Reply to
Bob Eager
You asked for an answer, and you got the correct one. Why bother asking?
Asuming the house hasn't caught fire, or someone isn't dead!
Reply to
Bob Eager
Be nice to get a bit of info of why I might not be able to do it as opposed to get an electrician.
Reply to
James
Because you have already demonstrated in your questions that you don't know enough about electricity and electrical wiring to be able to do the job safely.
Reply to
Andy Hall
Fair enough, your posts tells me I'm out of my depth and I'll happily get a professional in.
Where the cooker is it has a dedicated circuit in place already, and on the wall a little below it is a 3 pin socket for a cooker, I simply thought I could buy the appropriate cable and wire it like a plug basically as what its looks like to me and from the wiring diagram in the manual.
It says 440v on the back of the cooker.
Reply to
James
Thats understood but an explanation of the the job at hand would be nice as I previously said.
Reply to
James
If you were expecting to be able to just plug this thing into a wall socket, then I'm afraid I suspect you are sadly mistaken.
From you description, it requires a special cable all the way back to the consumer unit. Post back with model details, and the wattage details from the rating plate on the thing.
If you don't appreciate why, it's definately time for an electrician. In your last sentences, you appear to have already realised this.
With appropriate knowledge, it it of course DIY-able. We'd certainly give specific advice on cable sizing etc etc, but your original post demonstrated such a lack of understanding that I think it would be ***seriously*** unwise to proceed down a DIY route.
Reply to
Ron Lowe
Including but not limited to:
- Determination of the rating and current requirements of the appliance.
- Determination of the adequacy of the supply, correct cabling and correct circuit protection to be correct for the appliance
- Isolation switch correctly positioned with respect to the intended place of installation of the appliance
Note in the above that the existence of a circuit and a switch does not necessarily mean that they are adequate, correctly positioned, properly protected or safe.
- Selection of suitable cable
- Determination that routing of cable will mean that it is adequately protected mechanically and thermally
- Testing of the finished installation for safety.
Reply to
Andy Hall
I hope you mean 240v.
Otherwise you have something suitable for some commercial kitchen and you will need to install an ( expensive ) 3-phase supply at your house for this.
In which case, the cost of a sparkey to hook it up is begining to pale into insignificance.....
You may be mistaken... How about you post the manufacturer and model?
Reply to
Ron Lowe
I appreciate your input and agree it could possible be dangerous for someone with limited electrical skills to do this. Perhaps I'll stick to putting up shelves and changing fuses :) ... I'll ring around in the morning and see whos available and costs.
I guess it was wishful thinking that it was plug and play.
I was after a little friendly advice which I usually get from here but I well got a bit of a ear bashing I feel, anyway onwards and upwards as they say.
Damn the old poxy cooker for packing up I just figured out how to use it aslwell. :)
Reply to
James
Then you are SOL, it ain't gonna work. Take it back to the shop.
After repeated requsts, you have STILL not told us the MANUFACTURER and MODEL... We cannot help any further untill you do so.
Reply to
Ron Lowe
In message , James writes
Well, basically, a normal draws more current than a mains ring is spec'd to deliver, it normally goes on it's own dedicated circuit from the consumer unit in 6mm T&E, with it's own fused spur
It's not a 5 minute job with a blade and a screwdriver
Reply to
geoff

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