Electrical socket from light switch for cctv.

Is it acceptable in the uk to put a socket for a cctv camera off of a light switch? The socket would only be a single and would be at approx 7/8 feet high. I know its possible and that the draw is very low but more asking if its against uk regulations. Cctv power is an ac to dc converter with standard uk plug.
Thank you
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malcolmf

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IANAE, but AIUI, you have to use a fused spur. Otherwise someone could come along and plug an electric fire or kettle into it, and fry the lighting circuit, possibly setting fire to the house as a result.
This means that if the CCTV PSU is of the wall-wart variety, it's a no-no - you'll have to take a spur off a ring main - but if it's an inline unit, as with say Dell laptop PSUs, then you can cut off the three-pin plug and wire the power lead into the fused spur outlet. Of course, the fuse in the spur unit needs to be 3A or less.
On Sat, 17 Nov 2012 00:56:53 +0000, malcolmf

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wrote:

Killing the cat, sparking off a nuclear event, accellerating global warming and throwing the western world back into the dark ages.
Most houses have circuit breakers these days you know, before that there were fuses.
Although it may be frowned on to dangle the heating system, shower and grandmas iron lung off the lighting circuit, I still wouldn,t think that the purchase of a fire extinguisher would be a worthwhile enterprise.

I cannot recollect what the regulations say, but bathroom fans are fed from the lighting circuit and the loads ust be similar.
Practically as a minimum I would use a dedicated connector that couldn't be connected to accidentally, or better still wire directly to a fused spur. Mounted outside, the camera should from a practical point of view be on its own circuit with an RCBO protecting it, unless of course you enjoy hunting around for ladders, tools etc in the dark during a thundestorm.
HN
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Then you need to have the house wiring seen to immediately. Lighting circuits should be protected by a suitable device in the CU to prevent the wiring frying even in event of a dead short.
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malcolmf wrote:

Where will you get the neutral from?
Bill
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On Sat, 17 Nov 2012 02:54:36 +0000, Bill Wright wrote:

String some bell wire across from a nearby lamp fitting?
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Jules Richardson wrote:

CT100 would be Bill's prefered cable:-)
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On 17/11/2012 17:56, ARW wrote:

It would only be fair, he had seen the way electricians wire aerials ;-)
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John Rumm wrote:

Don't get me started.
http://www.wrightsaerials.tv/roguesgallery/035.shtml
Bill
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Bill Wright wrote:

I can find a shot on streetview of an apprentice leaning out of a hotel window and using strip connector to extend an aerial cable:-)
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On 18/11/2012 05:17, Bill Wright wrote:

I particularly like this one: http://www.wrightsaerials.tv/roguesgallery/042.shtml
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On 2012-11-21, AlanD wrote:

I like the way everything is clearly colour-coded, mostly red.
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ARW wrote:

The best way to use coax for mains is to use the inner for line and the outer for neutral. Don't bother about an earth. No-one bothers connecting the earth these days. It's just a hang-over from the early days of radio when a good earth was needed for reception. Note that when you power your electric fire through coax you actually save on your electricity bill because the coax gets very hot and helps warm the room. There is no cost for this because it's the same electricity as is going through the fire, so you get the benefit of it twice. If the small of burning plastic bothers you just push the coax under the rug.
Bill
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[Snip]
Bill's not wrong. When a student and working with SSEB, I came across a small area in Edinburgh which was wired with "concentric" mains cable.
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charles wrote:

Well there you are then. What's good enough for Auld Reekie is good enough for me. What was the csa of the inner, by the way? A tad more than 1mm2 I would guess?
Of course nowadays they use coax with two inners for mains supplies...
Bill
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There was indeed coax for mains. The core was live. Of the outer conductor, half the strands were individually insulated, which were neutrals and the the other were not, which were the earth. Haven't seen any for forty years. It was supposed to be safer as the live conductor was inside the others.
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On 18/11/2012 07:15, harry wrote:

Its called "split concentric"...

Still in common use, you can see it here:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?title=File:TNSUsingPMECutout3.jpg

I suspect its real benefit is its much harder to stick nails through and steal electricity.
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On 18/11/12 05:47, Bill Wright wrote:

You sure? when I laid mine it just had an outer and an inner.

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On Sun, 18 Nov 2012 05:35:53 +0000 (GMT), charles

I've seen it used in the past year for a new installation of street lighting, Single red core, spiral armour for combined neutral / earth, probably still got a short offcut somewhere that I picked up.
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<Snip>
Err no. If you're getting heat out he cable it's because it has resistance which reduces the total current through the cable/fire combination. Any heat gain in the cable has an equal reduction in the fire.
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