Dremel Multi Tool or Cheaper alternative?

I am going to purchase a Dremel multi tool or a cheaper alternative for a range of general DIY work. A number of these multi tools are available made by different manufacturers not just Dremel. All models looked at so far come with a Flex Shaft attachment so that tool can be usefully held like a pen for doing addtional stuff like engraving etc.
Electronic speed variation appears to be the main consideration as some tools have variable speeds starting from 5000 RPM going up to 35000 RPM. Alternatively, some tools have a higher start speed at 17000 RPM going up to 33500 RPM. Why the different speeds and how important is the lower speeds?
Ones I've looked at so far come from Dremel with cheaper alternatives coming from Clarke and Draper. Can anyone comment on the above or recommend the particular tool their using and why?
Many thanks for any comments DC
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On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 02:48:49 +0000, DC <> wrote:

Bear in mind that a tool like a Dremel is fine for small intricate work but it won't be up to the job of doing general DIY work.
Basically a Dremel is a small router, and to provide something suitable for general DIY really needs a range of routers. From small to large something like the following would be ideal:
Dremel Rotozip Rebel Router 500W-800W Router 1200W Router 1800W
You could skive on some in the middle of that range if you needed to.
PoP
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[T] Just out of interest, what is the Rotozip tool like? I thought a use might be cutting electrical box holes in plasterboard? How much should I pay for one?
I have had the Dremel for many years (with variable PSU) and when I need it iit's invaluable ..
All the best ..
T i m
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They are generically fairly useful for the kind of job you describe.
I have a Senco battery powered one which came as part of a deal with a collated screwdriver.
I wouldn't pay a lot for a tool like this but realistically a Dremel is not quite substantial enough for plasterboard cutting.

.andy
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I paid £25 on ebay. It's a bit bigger/more powerful than the dremel.
PoP
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[T] Ok ..just Woolies had one lonely one in a scruffy box the last time I was in there ... I think it was 'reduced' to +AKM-29.99 (with some extra bits or summat) might have taken a score (or even +AKM-25) for it .. ?
All the best ..
T i m
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It's hardly worth the bother of using any power tool for making this sort of hole in plasterboard - it cuts so easily with a padsaw.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 00:01:35 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman

[T] Damn (I was looking for a 'need' for the Rotozip) ;-)
So, if not the Rotozip I could use the Bosch sabre saw for plasterboard boxes? (say 'yes' please as I've not had chance to use it yet!)
All the best ..
T i m
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I'd say of all the power tools if you must use one to cut out a hole in plasterboard, an ordinary jigsaw is as good as any. I'd break off a blade so it only cuts slightly beneath the thickness of the board.
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On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 00:01:35 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman

I recently had to cut a large oblong hole in a plasterboard wall because a new bath was slightly longer than the bathroom, and this required one end of the bath to poke into that wall.
This job could not have been done easily with a padsaw because there were a couple of buried vertical wooden struts buried in the wall. The Rotozip did the job perfectly well.
I had to fix a batten to the wall first and then run the Rotozip along the batten to make a nice straight line. I surely wouldn't have relished that job without the Rotozip!
PoP
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A jigsaw? If you only have a Rotozip then of course that will do it too, but it's not the only way. I do have a B&Q 'Rotozip', but it's not come out of the box often. Perhaps I should play with it more.
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On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 08:21:30 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman

[T] Josing aside here Dave I do have and use a couple of padsaws. One has a fairly course 6" blade and is great for plasterboard or taking a bit off a sticky out piece of oood etc. The other has a hacksaw blade in it for getting to that akward pipe or nail ;-)
I recently helped a mate replace 8 wooden framed ally 'Crittal' (sp?) windows with UPVC ones.
We used his 800W sabre saw to 'gently' cut out the old frames whilst doing little / no damage to the overlapping exterior render and internal plasterwork.
All the best ..
T i m
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[T] Good news ..

[T] Ok, Woolies .. here we come ;-)
All the best ..
T i m
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wrote:

sort
I recently had to cut a hole in a tiled bathroom wall to fit a flex outlet for a towel rail. The ceramic cutting tool went through the tile and plasterboard like butter (really hard, straight from the fridge butter but you get the idea) and made a neat, chip free hole for the fastafix backbox. It's not a daily use tool but it comes in handy for that kind of job. Regards, Richard
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On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 11:48:05 -0000, "Frisket"

Hi Richard,
Thanks for the update.
You have remonded me there could be a similar job I could do (ceramic cistern lid wont fit propery due to tiles over tiles ... use Rotozip to trim tiles back <g>)
Woolies had sold the last one (@ +AKM-29.99) so I might go to eBay (there are a few up there).
Less anyone knows where you can get them from cheaper?
All the best ..
T i m
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DC <> wrote:

DIY? It's got virtually no uses for DIY. Hobbies, etc, possibly.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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the flexi shaft gets hot and falls apart,as found out.lol I use two different types and there good. the bits I buy cheap(workzone) there all the sameIMO.
watch the cut off, red, disc as they brake off very easy and if like me your in the was with your face, they stick in your cheek. the wire brush spits out bits of wire as well. so all ways use these, safety glasses.
All the best. Phil.
member of the new wanky workshop.
<DC> wrote in message

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On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 02:48:49 +0000, DC <> wrote:

I have one of the Dremel Professional tools and use it quite regularly. Main applications are for cut off using the miniature grinding wheels, fine drilling, fine routing in confined spaces, grinding and clean up on small things.
It is relatively specific because of its size, but when I do use it it's because a larger tool won't do the job. THe speed control is certainly useful because some of the finer drilling applications work better at lower speed, whereas others like routing are better done at high speed.
However, I wouldn't describe this as a general purpose DIY tool because although useful for the range of jobs it does, it won't tackle larger things at any useful rate of work. If you are mainly thinking about small size jobs then I think it's ideal.
For larger jobs where an adaptable and more substantial tool is needed, I have a Fein Multimaster.
This is a much more substantial tool with a 180W motor which delivers an oscillating motion at the head. There are dozens of accessories which make it useful for detail or even more substantial sanding jobs as well as cutting of various materials, scraping etc. I tend to use this more than the Dremel, although it varies according to the jobs that I am doing.
http://www.fein.de/fein-multimaster/en/multimaster/index.html
These start at slightly north of £100, but well worth the cost.
.andy
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I was thinking of mentioning that one as a more GP tool. I too have one, with all the extra bits. Can't fault it at all, it's got me out of allsorts of tricky situations - well recommended. My Dad uses a Rotozip, apparently that does quite well for getting out of tricky situations, and slightly larger than the Dremel powerwise. Definitely more useful for DIY than a Dremel. ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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Sorry, prehaps I was a little misleading with my original post in that when I said General Purpose DIY work, I actually meant the more smaller DIY intricate DIY jobs.
On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 02:48:49 +0000, DC <> wrote:

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