OT New phone number fun

A few weeks ago we moved from CT to FL and in the transition, got a land line phone. The number were were given belonged to a person named Dan XXXX. I know there is some time lapse before a number is reassigned, but we still get calls for Dan.
My standard reply varies. Sometimes, it is "Danny passed away a few months back and we miss him dearly"
Other times, "Dan is in Federal Prison. He won't be out for another 8 to 10 years."
Dan also got a call from Lyft offering a driving job. I talked to them a while and told them I can start as soon as my parole officer gives the OK. Don't worry, I was not dealing drugs, just bank robbery.
Another call was for health insurance. I asked if they could cover me as I'm in Federal prison. The caller checked with someone and said I should talk to the warden as they would have some coverage.
I'm just waiting for Dan to call and ask "any messages for me?"
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On Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at 12:17:01 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

What if you instead get a lawsuit for slander from Dan? Suppose he loses a job because of it? Your real beef is with the phone provider. If you just got the new number, why not tell them about the problem and get a new number?
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On 1/8/2019 9:04 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Getting a new number again would be a real PITA for me.
I'm sure if Dan is still alive, his doctor, bank, stock broker and ex-wives have the right number.
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Dan is out there - providing YOUR number to all the scammers and telemarketers and bathroom walls in the county ! ... you sure are having fun with his callers ! Duh ! John T.
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On Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at 9:34:33 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Another option would have been to just port your old number.
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On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 07:45:18 -0800 (PST), trader_4

I don't think you can port an old land line number into a new land line number. It is hard wired, not just a state of mind for a cell carrier switch.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

About 2 years ago I had my land line number ported over to the local cable/internet type service. A friend had done the same to his.
Maybe years ago they were hard wired. Another friend moved to another house and he asked for a special number for his land line that no one else had about 15 years ago.
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On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 11:40:43 -0500, Ralph Mowery

That is still not a land line
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On Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at 1:45:19 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The commonly accepted definition of a landline is any phone that uses wire or fiber, eg it includes VOIP over cable. As opposed to cellular or sat phone that is wireless. Most people getting a new line will be getting VOIP, copper is rapidly declining and the carriers want to be rid of it. If you want to restrict landline to mean only copper, then that's what I would call it, copper.
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On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 12:50:04 -0800 (PST), trader_4

Don't go all Trump on me here. A land line is POTS. If he had VIOP he would not have to change anything. They don't have a clue where he is unless they sniff the IP address. POTS can run over fiber, microwave or over copper but that phone number dead ends at the Dmark on the side of his house.
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On Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at 6:15:53 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Not in my world, or here:
Landline - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Landline A landline telephone (also known as land line, land-line, main line, home p hone, landline, fixed-line, and wireline) is a phone that uses a metal wire or optical fiber telephone line for transmission as distinguished from a m obile cellular line, which uses radio waves for transmission.
What is a Landline? - Computer Hope
https://www.computerhope.com › Dictionary › L - Definitions Apr 26, 2017 - Alternatively referred to as a main line, a landline is a te rm used to describe a telephone that is connected to other phones over a ca ble or any other line. This term is often used when comparing or describing a standard home phone to a cordless or cell phone that has no wires or lin es.
Merriam Webster landline noun land·​line | \ˈland-ˌlīn \ variants: or less commonly land line Definition of landline
1 : a line of transportation or communication on land especially : a teleph one line that transmits signals from one station to another directly along a wire without the use of radio waves

Maybe. That's true if he owns his eqpt and has a service that doesn't care, eg Ooma or Majic Jack or similar. You can take that and plug it in aywhere there is an ethernet connection.
But if he has Verizon FIOS eqpt or Cablevision eqpt, he can't take that eqpt and use it on some other cable system. He probably could port the number though.

They sure do if they supply the eqpt to do the VOIP, which they typically do. You think I can take a Cablevision/NY router from here and VOIP phone that comes out of it and just put it on some cable system in FL? that uses different eqpt?

No idea what that even means. As I and others here have said, we have ported numbers from a POTS copper line to VOIP with no problems. The phone number is just a mapping within the electronic switching system.
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On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 16:53:24 -0800 (PST), trader_4

Not any FIOS I have ever heard of. That goes through the LATA just like any other POTS line. It just leaves on fiber

FIOS is not the same as any of those internet services which are really more like cell phones as far as the TELCO is concerned. When you port a number, it is still going through that local exchange and over the internet to wherever you are, on a cell you are essentially roaming.

BUT it is in THAT switching system. As long as you are in the same area code, moving a number is usually easy. As soon as you move away from that hub (probably more than one central office, particularly in an overlay area), not so much.

As I stated before, we had a microwave backbone in Naples that ran off the Ft Myers central office. All POTS lines there ran off of RF, at least for that leg. I have fiber to the end of my street and copper to the house for my POTS line. Still confused?
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On Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at 8:32:47 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

e phone, landline, fixed-line, and wireline) is a phone that uses a metal w ire or optical fiber telephone line for transmission as distinguished from a mobile cellular line, which uses radio waves for transmission.

ons

term used to describe a telephone that is connected to other phones over a cable or any other line. This term is often used when comparing or describ ing a standard home phone to a cordless or cell phone that has no wires or lines.

ephone line that transmits signals from one station to another directly alo ng a wire without the use of radio waves

Not what? That you can't port a Verizon FIOS number?

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Say what? Those VOIP services are nothing like a cell phone, they are routed as internet packets. AFAIK, cell phone calls are still on the public switched phone network.

That makes no sense. If you have a cell phone and port it to another cell phone carrier, why would it suddenly turn into going over the internet , instead of staying withing the phone switching network?

I've seen lots and lots of reports of people porting numbers and it has little to do with where you are, nor is there any need to stay within the area code or central office. A lot of people have ported their phone numbers to Google Voice, for example. Apparently they can accept most numbers from anywhere in the country. People do that to keep their number and to hopefully not have to port it again.

The essential issue here is what exactly defines "landline". If you follow those definitions above, then by my reading of them, VOIP is still included. If you can't get someone on their cell, and you say to someone, I'm going to try Bob on his....? What word would you use? Home phone would be an obvious choice. If you couldn't use that, what would you say? I'd say landline whether it was POTS or VOIP. IDK what else you could say, because in most cases you don't know whether it's POTS or VOIP and don't care.
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On Wed, 9 Jan 2019 06:14:25 -0800 (PST), trader_4

But you can't port a POTS to another POTS if it is out of that area. Certainly not 1500 miles away

The "Al Gore internet" was actually a loop of fiber that goes around the US with spur lines off to the major cities that got installed in the 80-90s and that is where most of the communication takes place, It is a big bundle of fiber with multiple users on different fibers in that bundle.

VOIP is not POTS period
If you have a new Jersey number, that is where your call lands. If the NJ telco ports it out to an internet or cell company IN NEW JERSEY, they are done. From there a 3d party is handling it. The call is not going over "phone lines" anymore and the telco routing is not being used. Once it is on the internet it is not a land line in any conventional sense. You can get it on WiFi from wherever you are. That is not wired at all
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On Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at 7:53:28 PM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

phone, landline, fixed-line, and wireline) is a phone that uses a metal wi re or optical fiber telephone line for transmission as distinguished from a mobile cellular line, which uses radio waves for transmission.

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term used to describe a telephone that is connected to other phones over a cable or any other line. This term is often used when comparing or describi ng a standard home phone to a cordless or cell phone that has no wires or l ines.

phone line that transmits signals from one station to another directly alon g a wire without the use of radio waves

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To continue with this, I see others taking the definition to mean that a landline is POTS only. But then they need to change those definitions because they sure don't say that. With VOIP, you still have a wire, cable, fiber, etc between the two phones, just on a different system. Also, say you call up Bob on his cell and he doesn't answer. So, you're going to say to someone that you're now going to try him on his....? What? Home phone would come naturally. But suppose you can't use that term, what would you say? I'd say I'm going to call him on his landline, whether that phone is POTS or VOIP. I'd say if you want to make it clear that you're talking only about POTS then that's the term that should be used and I agree that's the correct term as opposed to copper, though the vast majority of those connections, virtually all of them to homes are in fact on copper wire.
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On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 17:41:28 -0800 (PST), trader_4

If you have a magic jack/vonage type system the central office is in the cloud so you can have any number you like within reason but if the local telco is sending you dial tone, your phone comes through your local office, whether that is FIOS or regular copper. Your phone number is captive to the trunks that come through that office, again whether they are copper, fiber or RF. Ed already said he could not port his number so I am not sure why you are still arguing about nomenclature.
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On Wednesday, January 9, 2019 at 1:22:44 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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ome phone, landline, fixed-line, and wireline) is a phone that uses a metal wire or optical fiber telephone line for transmission as distinguished fro m a mobile cellular line, which uses radio waves for transmission.

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a term used to describe a telephone that is connected to other phones over a cable or any other line. This term is often used when comparing or descr ibing a standard home phone to a cordless or cell phone that has no wires o r lines.

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Look into Google Voice and see if you can explain how they can liberate that local phone number. I think it's a two step process to port a POTS line over. You have to port it to a cell phone first, then to GV. But then that number, from whatever area code and local CO is routed instead to GV and you can get rid of your POTS service from your local phone company. So, you've kept the number, moved it to GV.

Well, nomenclature matters and if "landline" is to only mean POTS, then they should change the definitions in dictionaries and similar to make it clear. As I've pointed out, I'd take it to mean any calls that travel over land as opposed to wireless because those calls are still traveling on land, between two fixed points, at least in 99.9% of the cases.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

What do you mean by 'hard wired" ? Is it that the number must go to the same physical place all the time ? Like a house will always have the same number ?
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On 1/8/2019 5:35 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Where a wire of some sort goes from a main trunk to a house. Numbers can be changed, but that is the typical landline that goes back to the 1870s or so. Now can be copper, fiber, coax, but still a wire, not radio waves.
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They had an RF link between Ft Myers and Naples for decades. It only went away when Sprint laid in their fiber backbone. Fiber to the house is still rare to non existent here. They are running their 25mb "Prizm" (TV, phone, internet) over copper for the last "X" feet, either to the street box or one a ways away.
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