OT Idiot lights-out drivers

rbowman posted for all of us...

Yes isn't it phenomenal? I drove a truck that had red lights, siren and air horn but I was the one ending up stopping...
I don't think they are escapees, they drive amongst us, no wonder the zombie and paranormal is so popular.
--
Tekkie

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If you drive politely, you'll get on a lot better.
--
Watching his date from the corner of his eye while he poured her a drink, the young bachelor said, "Say when."
She replied, "Right after that drink."
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wrote:

Ignore it and it ends up being a 50,000 lb peterbuilt with a blown headlight???
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On 02/13/2016 08:27 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I drove OTR for about 7 years in the '90s. In my case it was a Volvo White. Trust me when I say people can ignore 75,000 pounds of dried beans bearing down on them. They also have the quaint idea they can play chicken with a truck and win.
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On 2/13/2016 3:31 PM, rbowman wrote:

My husband did OTR for a while, and then drove locally for a while. He said a lot of people had that same quaint idea about playing chicken with trucks!
--
Maggie

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On 02/13/2016 02:34 PM, Muggles wrote:

I've sometimes wondered what goes on in the mind of an Audi TTS driver trying to force his way into traffic when he has to loop up to read the logo on the 11/R22.5 steer tire. He may be a master of the universe in his world, but he was a speed bump in mine.
In most circumstances I let people in but when someone figures they're so important they deserve to cut into the head of the line my stubborn streak comes out.
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On 2/13/2016 7:50 PM, rbowman wrote:

yeah I like truckers, for good reasons. I'll nearly always let them in if I can do it safely, flash my lights at them if they let me in to thank them, and try to give them a wide birth. On the way to work I could swear they let me in the rocking chair on purpose so I could get off on my exit. Least I'd like to think they did that more than once.
--
Maggie

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On 02/13/2016 09:25 PM, Muggles wrote:

You develop a different attitude, particularly as an OTR driver. You're driving ten to twelve thousand miles a month and you're typically not running on a tight schedule. By that I mean you don't have to get to the office by 9:00. Most of my runs were at least 1,000 miles. You learn to take the long view. A few minutes one way or the other don't mean anything and you have plenty of time to study traffic patterns.
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wrote:

I wish all OTR drivers thought the same way you do. Too many ARE on a tight schedule - they have to have their load at the dock between 3:15 and 4:00 pm tomorrow, and to keep your logbook legal you cannot lose 20 minutes in the next 14 hours or you have to stop for the mandated rest period - meaning you will be a few hours late. I have 2 brothers who made their living as OTR drivers for many years. One is currently either running the ice road in northern Sakatchewan or waiting for the road to open, and the other took his own life last year.
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On 2/13/2016 11:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

awe I'm so sorry for your loss clare. :(
--
Maggie

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On 02/13/2016 10:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The computers weren't around when I was driving so logbooks were a work of art. In the US, you could only be on for 10 hours.
The guys are felt sorry for were the east coast drivers. Most of their stuff was short hauls from city to city. Screw around all day getting loaded, drive all night to get there for a morning delivery, screw around all day getting loaded... I don't know when they ever slept.
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Work of art as in easy to fiddle?
--
I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it. -- Mark Twain

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On 02/17/2016 09:33 AM, Mr Macaw wrote:

Very. The logbooks we used were tablet size books with a carbon. The original was turned in with the trip envelope and the carbons were your record. The books were not bound, just conveniently held together with two common staples. It was simple to unbend the staples, take out some pages, and do a retroactive version of what you'd been up to. You'd always grab a handful of logs before setting out so you had a supply of spare pages. Or even staples. Sometimes the damn things would break if you unbent and bent them too many times.
In the short term you could just use another book that could be a complete work of fiction.
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On Sun, 14 Feb 2016 00:17:31 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I would appreciate it if you would leave a blank line between your words and the previous poster's.

This was a long time ago, 1971, but I was standing on the interstate where the road from St. Louis split, with one fork going to Chicago and the other to Indianapolis. I was headed for Chicago. A semi stopped for me. He told me that he had missed me the first time he passed me, going too fast and he'd gone to the next exit, turned around gone to the previous exit, turned around again, and picked me up. I thanked him graciously, but it still amazes me.
It was a beautiful day, no later than 11AM. He could have easily let someone else pick me up. It was Feburary though, about 3 days after Mardi Gras. Still, I don't get it. It must have taken him 20 minutes to turn around twice.
He dropped me off on the Springfield Il. bypass, and it was hard to get a ride there. A cop must have driven by because a voice came out of nowhere, Get off the road. But there was nowhere to go which woudln't have required hitching. I got a ride before he came back.
I had hoped to get rides with truckers because I thought they'd be interesting, but I think I only got two, from New Orleans to Chicago. The rest were all cars.

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wrote:

Vast majority of OTR truckers are not allowed to pick up hitch-hikers. Totally forbidden, in fact.

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On Mon, 15 Feb 2016 20:39:24 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I was mixed up. It was even earlier, more like 1968, when not as many were bound by those rules, I suppose. But I do understand why others passed me by.

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A decent newsreader like mine shows each poster in a different colour, aswell as indenting it, so it's clear which is hers.

A similar thing happened to me. A trucker was heading the wrong way for where I was going, but was dropping something off and returning in 20 minutes. He deliberately went past me on the way back to see if I was still there, and picked me up.
I wonder if there's any truth in the rules that most truckers are forbidden by their companies from picking up hitchhikers? I have had a few hand signals from them driving past which looked like "sorry I can't".

In the UK, most car drivers don't pick up hitchhikers, which I think is ridiculous. I always pick them up.

Typical cop.

Truckers also tend to be going further, so you make more distance before having to find another ride.
--
More people in the UK are injured by standing on upturned mains plugs than by electric shocks.

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On 02/17/2016 09:37 AM, Mr Macaw wrote:

Very much so in this country. We have 30 million lawyers in search of work and they would have a field day if an unauthorized passenger was injured. For most larger companies you're fired if you're caught.
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On Sun, 14 Feb 2016 00:17:31 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I"m sorry. I hadn't read to the end of the post.
I'm so sorry about your brother.
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So the so called safety feature of logging times actually causes loss of life. For goodness sake.
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shagger to save just one Scottish soldiers life, then I have only three things to say: Red is positive, Black is
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