What was the BEST tip you learned here at the Wreck?

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wrote:

If you used a nice warm wood for the workbench top rather than a cold metal for the drawers, it's no wonder they're migrating. It's cold! :-)
Puckdropper
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Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

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Send for the LV catalog - I'm still not certain if that was the best tip or the worst. ;-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Kill file trolls and knot heads.
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When just starting out with routers, but one of those cheap multi-sets and see how you like the profile. When a bit wears out, buy a good quality bit.
Puckdropper
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My tip is the only way to keep knots from bleeding though painted woodwork is shellac. Forget Kiltz or any other stain killer paint (unless you use shellac first).
My father told me this and I didn't believe him and I used a stain killer paint (BIN) on some old woodwork. One year later the knots bleed though again. Then I built a shelf for my sons closest out of a piece of pine with huge knots that that were practically oozing sap. I painted the knots with 3 coats of shellac followed by stain kill paint, followed by latex. After three years there is sill no sign of the knots in the closet or on the old woodwork.
I've also used it outside on that pre-primed pine trim that Home Depot/Lowes sells with good success. I think they prime it so you can't see how many knots are present. Same formula, thee coats shellac, followed by stain kill paint, followed by latex.
Scott
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BIN is tinted shelac.

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CW wrote:

According to the can BIN is a "high-performance white-pigmented shellac-based primer-sealer"
It also says on the can that "new or unseasoned wood knots may require one or two coats of Bulls-Eye Amber Shellac prior to spot priming with B-I-N."
Instead of amber, I use blond shellac because it is easier to cover with white paint.
Scott
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1st - Norm is nuts, do NOT wipe the glue squeezeout with a damp cloth, instead don't get glue on your stock in the first place
2nd - Scary Sharp
3rd - a small electric iron and a touch of water will make most dents and shallow "scratches" disappear as long as the wood fibers aren't broken or cut. And sometimes when they ARE.
Mike Mike Patterson Please remove the spamtrap to email me. "I always wanted to be somebody...I should have been more specific..." - Lily Tomlin
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On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 14:52:36 -0500, Mike Patterson

Norm isn't nuts, he just isn't the end-all, be-all of woodworking. From Norm, I've learned to avoid his full-auto brad nailer and painting expensive wood because he can't finish worth a damn.

Which is really, really cool and probably one of the most valuable things out there for new woodworkers to learn.
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The one real disadvantage to making your chisels and such Scary Sharp is that if you happen to brush against the edge, there's no pain. The first sign that you've cut yourself is seeing drops of blood appearing on your work.
Here's another tip: hydrogen peroxide does a great job of removing bloodstains from wood. DAMHIKT. Or *why* I know this...
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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And blood stains from clothing.
On Sat, 04 Nov 2006 13:46:35 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

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Tue, Oct 31, 2006, 8:40am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@topworks.ca (Robatoy) doth sayeth: For me it was this one: <snip>
I'm thinking it was to paint my tools. I'd heard of it before, but had never thought of doing it myslf. Now my sons don't even "use" my tools, let alone "borrow" them.
Borrow \Bor"row\, n. 1. Something your children do with your tools and then drop them where they have been used, or take with no intention of ever returning them to you. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]
JOAT If it can't kill you, it ain't a sport.
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Cut my gums on a lot of advise on the wreck, but the one that saved me a LOT of work was to use a piece of sharpened copper tubing wrenched into a drill to auger out around a busted brass screw, sets up for a clean plug - thanks again to whoever imparted that wee bit of wisdom (Charlie b..I think...)
Schroeder

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For me, it's a tossup between learning about Lee Valley, and the TS-Aligner.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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For me?
I've learned that faffing around is annoying. I now avoid faffing around as much as possible.
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On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 19:05:43 +0000, Doug Miller wrote:

I came here specifically to ask about the TS-Aligner.
It's expensive.
Is it worth the money?
Bill
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Yep.

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Depends. How fussy are you about precision? That's the real question.
Did you watch the videos on his web page? It's worth it to do this so you know exactly what you get.
If you want to get an alignment tool, check out the comparisons on Ed's web page. I didn't buy any of the other tools (except for a dial indicator on a stick) but by careful reading, I considered the TS Aligner Jr to be the Cream of the Crop.
(And do they have videos?)
I don't know by name those who makes the alignment tools that the catalogs sell. Having Ed's personal service with any problems on the TS Aligner Jr is worth a lot to me.
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On Thu, 02 Nov 2006 11:39:44 +0000, Bruce Barnett wrote:

In a former life I was a tool & diemaker.

Yes. Repeatedly.
Based on several positive responses and the lack of any negative ones thus far, The Ts-Aligner just got added to my wish list. When I tuned my saw last year, I used a toolmakers surface gage with an indicator mounted and riding in a miter slot. I got things to within about .0005" of right ... more than close enough. But it took me all afternoon to do it. I'd like to make re-checking alignment a 5 minute job.
So far, it sounds as if the aligner is the tool to accomplish that.
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Yup!
I spend the time to read the comparisons Ed makes to competitive products on his web page. The competition with MasterGage makes interesting reading.
http://www.ts-aligner.com/tsjrvsmg.htm
I think this gives you better insight into what Ed feels is important. If other other manufacturers made such info available, it would be wonderful for intelligent consumers.
The decision was a no-brainer. I knew I was getting the best product available.
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