Sketup Question

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Here's a partial look of the tool kit. Those modules live on another monitor, but I have dragged them over here to give you some indication. The pull-down in the centre are all tools/commands missing in SU...
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Palettes.jpg
Keep in mind, that most single tool icons can/will launch a dialog box, something like this base cabinet parametric. Those exist for just about any kind of cabinets and commercial/office furniture.
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Picture4.png
Another example of a parametric. One of several dozen different stair designs.
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Picture5.png
..and then there is the rendering aka pretty picturesit will create if called upon. (By a customer who can't decide what wood grain to go with in her kitchen.)
I could be more specific, but I don't have that kind of time.
r
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wrote:
Here's a partial look of the tool kit. Those modules live on another monitor, but I have dragged them over here to give you some indication. The pull-down in the centre are all tools/commands missing in SU...
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Palettes.jpg
Ok, but I am talking from a ww project point of view. I do realize that CAD programs have lots more tools, I'v been using a bunch since 1997 myself. ;~)
Keep in mind, that most single tool icons can/will launch a dialog box, something like this base cabinet parametric. Those exist for just about any kind of cabinets and commercial/office furniture.
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Picture4.png
Another example of a parametric. One of several dozen different stair designs.
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Picture5.png
Take a poke here, http://www.crai.archi.fr/RubyLibraryDepot/Ruby/en_sections.html ther are a bunch of plug ins that make Sketch up more fashonable. ;~) there are several "stair" plug ins.
..and then there is the rendering aka pretty picturesit will create if called upon. (By a customer who can't decide what wood grain to go with in her kitchen.)
Sketch can do that with the correct chosen material.
I could be more specific, but I don't have that kind of time.
Understood
r
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Oh.. then there is the interface to this program for my router:
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Picture6.png
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wrote:
Oh.. then there is the interface to this program for my router:
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Picture6.png
Router Shmouter! Sketchup interfaces my PRINTER!!! ;~)
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Robatoy wrote:

From here it looks more like when you do find the time, Swingman makes you look rather unfamiliar with SU's capabilities.
Not sure what you use all that fancy CAD software for that SU can't do, but it must be pretty technical? Don't you build counter tops?
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Well, Jack, seeing as you show a keen interest in what it is I do, allow me to tell you a bit about my building of countertops.
When a client orders a countertop, say a Hanstone Quartz top, and that client wants an undermounted Franke sink, my job then includes getting a file from the sink manufacturer and creating a toolpath for a CNC router. In the case of Quartz, I do not have the capability to cut that material as I have not invested the millions it takes to do that properly and competetively, but it is 40% of my business.
So I send a file (pictured, as I doubt you could open the actual file) (There are now hundreds of these kinds of sinks)
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Picture9.png
to these guys:
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Picture10.png who then plunge their $ 3000.00 worth of diamond bits into multiples of thousands of dollars worth of Quartz slabs and them make it all pretty and send it to me all finished for me and my guys to install it. The files I send them, also include a scribed set of complex curves for any back-wall aberrations , the sink-file location co-ordinates etc.
Average cost of the jobs range between $3K and $9K. Sometimes more.
I then install the sink(s) under the very accurately cut hole and presto, happy customer, Rob gets big cheque.
In the meantime, I now feed those sink files via my CNC into my Corian slabs, here at my shop, and do the same things for other clients.
I then install the sink(s) under the very accurately cut hole and presto, happy customer, Rob gets big cheque. Again.
..are you still with me, Jack??
Is that really a job for SU? Do my clients, such as the nation-wide chains like Rona, Home Hardware and IKEA open SU files? Jack?
But you're right. I fabricate countertops.
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"Robatoy" told us in great detail...

Well, Jack, seeing as you show a keen interest in what it is I do, allow me to tell you a bit about my building of countertops.
When a client orders a countertop, say a Hanstone Quartz top, and that client wants an undermounted Franke sink, my job then includes getting a file from the sink manufacturer and creating a toolpath for a CNC router. In the case of Quartz, I do not have the capability to cut that material as I have not invested the millions it takes to do that properly and competetively, but it is 40% of my business.
So I send a file (pictured, as I doubt you could open the actual file) (There are now hundreds of these kinds of sinks)
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Picture9.png
to these guys:
http://s123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/?action=view&current=Picture10.png who then plunge their $ 3000.00 worth of diamond bits into multiples of thousands of dollars worth of Quartz slabs and them make it all pretty and send it to me all finished for me and my guys to install it. The files I send them, also include a scribed set of complex curves for any back-wall aberrations , the sink-file location co-ordinates etc.
Average cost of the jobs range between $3K and $9K. Sometimes more.
I then install the sink(s) under the very accurately cut hole and presto, happy customer, Rob gets big cheque.
In the meantime, I now feed those sink files via my CNC into my Corian slabs, here at my shop, and do the same things for other clients.
I then install the sink(s) under the very accurately cut hole and presto, happy customer, Rob gets big cheque. Again.
..are you still with me, Jack??
Is that really a job for SU? Do my clients, such as the nation-wide chains like Rona, Home Hardware and IKEA open SU files? Jack?
But you're right. I fabricate countertops. ================================================ Whaaaaat????
I thought you just took a hamnmer and chisel to it and carved out the sink hole caveman style!!! LOL
There IS an advantage to being a tool snob. It allows you to do many things that others can not. As you pointed out above. Besides, if you weren't getting some checks (cheques) out of this, you couldn't afford to buy big, fancy routers!
I am also a tool snob. A financially challenged tool snob, mind you. But still a tool snob. But tool snobs do play an important role in this world of ours.
I applaud google for putting a software tool out there that people can use to build things for a very good price. I am concerned that it is part of the overall effect of the world wide web dumbing things down in general. It raises the abilities of many. But also degrades expectations and abilities of many as well. There are those who will do many things well with this tool. But like anything, many will not.
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"Lee Michaels" wrote

As with a hammer ...
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Lee Michaels wrote:

A happy thought for tool snobs: SketchUp is a tool available for the downloading and, among other things, can itself be a tool for imagineering and building tools that either one cannot afford to purchase - and/or that no one else has yet imagined.
And sometimes it's even necessary to come up with new tools in order to produce a never-before-seen new tool...
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DeSoto Solar
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"Morris Dovey" wrote

I love that word "imagineer" ... first time I heard/saw it was on the business card of Hondo Crouch of Luckenbach, Texas fame, almost 40 years ago. AAMOF, I was honored to be on his 'washer pitching' team at one point. :)
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Last night, I took a tour around Manhattan in Google Earth with the 3d buildings turned on. *That* is what SU excels at, the reason it exists, and why Google gives it away. Combined with a 3dconnexion mouse, the view was simply stunningly, the experience absolutely jaw dropping. Imagine now, everyone running around with their free CAD system, and doing the same with the rest of the countryside. That's the real gift, I think, even though SU by itself rightly earns its kudos.
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MikeWhy wrote:

You should see it from an airplane... You do the entire loop around 900 feet up.
Here's an example: <http://www.meretrix.com/~harry/images/flying/hudson-apr2005/
It's even better at night!
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Yah. Done that. Made that podunk midwest cow town look insignificant; second city my hairy behind. Really, though. Try Manhattan in Google Earth with a 3dConnexion mouse. Get right in on top of Penn Station and the nearby penthouses. It's a different view, definitely a much richer level of detail compared to zooming past at 120 kts a few miles away, even given the crude resolution of the pasted on bitmap textures.
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MikeWhy wrote:

I've looked down at Penn Station (MSG) from the 86th floor of the Empire State Building. <G>
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Looked better than from the airplane, didn't it? Well... it's time to let this one die. I think we done beat it to death. Or I did anyway. :D
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Can you still do that?
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Robatoy wrote:

Sure!
Yankee games complicate things, as they toss up a 3 mile to 3000 ft. With no game, it's no big deal.
You can also do the trip @ 1100 feet, with full ATC traffic separation, if Newark and LaGuardia aren't flat-out.
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Yes, FREE is about as good a price as there is...

I think it's just the opposite. I think it gives many people, like woodworkers, the opportunity to learn to use computer software to do stuff that the normally would not do. The bad thing I see is hobbyist woodworkers end up wasting lots of time on the computer instead of the shop.

That makes no sense to me?
There are those who will

Hard to argue with that...

I couldn't figure out why Google gives something this nice away for free? If what you say is true, I find it interesting that I like it for drawing up cabinets and don't even have the slightest clue what I'd use it and Google earth for? I know what I use Google earth for, and SU for, but have a tough time connecting the two? I guess if you were building a house and wanted to orient it with Google earth, but even then, what is in it for Google? Google earth is free, SU is free? I've always gone by the idea that if something seems too good to be true (other than some free GNU stuff), it probably isn't. I'm still wondering about SU, but so far, so good...
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Jack Stein wrote:

It does to me. It either limits design solutions to those using only straight lines or circular/elliptical arcs, and doesn't "understand" solids (which it deals with only as closed collections of surfaces).
I'll agree that it may be a great tool for drawing up boxes, but I also recognize that it discourages people from thinking beyond boxes (and/or aggregates of boxes) and circular arcs.
It makes me a bit uncomfortable to say it right out loud, and I assure you that no offense is intended - but if what you're saying is that nothing more is needed, then you've proved the point you say didn't make sense to you. :-/
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Still don't understand the point? SU allows woodworkers to draw up 2d and 3d drawings of stuff they wish to build, it does it cheaply (free) and does it well. I think it meets the needs and expectations of most woodworkers. Certainly not every wood worker, perhaps not one that uses a CNC machine that interfaces with perhaps AUTOCAD that costs thousands and probably is used by people designing billion dollar launch pads for NASA, and went to school for x years learning how to use the software.

Most of the stuff wood workers build is made up of straight lines and curves. SU handles those with ease, thats why it's the perfect tool for most woodworkers.

No offense taken, but while I never said that nothing more is needed, I heard someone else say they don't need to draw all the details of things they build. I agree, and more over, when I was building stuff at a furious pace, I hardly needed more than a few pencil lines with numbers on them to build most anything, often not even that.
I still don't really need SU, and certainly nothing more than SU to build stuff, It is really good for looking at exactly how a new design might look before you build it.
I can tell you for sure, as a hobbyist wood worker I absolutely, positively would not spend much (any) money on a cad program when I can spend a few minutes with a pencil drawing up an entire kitchen, or work bench, or lamp, or chair, or desk, or end table, or door or shed and build it just fine. I KNOW this because I've done it. So, from my prospective, and I bet a lot of woodworkers, SU does just the opposite of what was said, it actually opens doors to CAD for woodworkers that would normally never spend a dime on AUTOCAD, TURBOCAD, DESIGN CAD or any other CAD program.
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