Sketup Question

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I have been reading the Sketchup posts with interest. I got a question for you Sketchup enthusiasts.
How appropriate would Sketchup be for metal projects to be fabricated by a welding shop? Specificaly projects made mostly with square tubing.
Their would need to be detailed information. This would include some odd angles, very specific lengths and positions of both holes and attachments welded to the subassemblies.
The 3 D perspective would be nice but not neccessary.
Comments? Suggestions?
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I see no problems in that application.
As far as accuracy, in inches you can go to .0001" or in 1/64" in fractions of an inch. In mm, .0001mm
3D perspective would be automatic.
Just remember to draw objects/components, not line drawings.
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How about dimensioning? I would need the lengths to be very clear.
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Not a problem, Sketchup has semi-automatic dimensioning. You point out the constraints Sketchup fills in the measurements. Pick a line and Sketchup will dimension that line. Pick two points and Sketchup will determine the distance between those points.
As mentioned in my other thread you can modify dimension results to outside the extension lines if the results will not fit between them. You can also modify the size of the font used.
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On Thu, 26 Feb 2009 09:52:34 -0600, "Leon"

...will it scale a drawing from one reference? Like, say, I draw a cabinet and then set the dimension of one of the rails? I fiddled with the tutorial the other nite and was surprised at the accessability...if can set the deminsion of my first piece and the program will scale the remainder, well, I'm in!
cg

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Snip

If I am not mistaken there are scripts that will do that.. Swingman?
Otherwise, if you draw your rail first and make it into a component and then copy that component over to another component to eventually form a cabinet, you can change all of the rail at the same time later on. If you want to make several different sized rails for other cabinets you make the already copied and completed rails "unique" so that they will no longer change when you modify the other component rails.
Over and over I mention components, they are a very useful way to put your cabinets together. One rail can be the basis for all rails in the drawings regardless of size or number of sizes. Until you make a component "unique" it will change with every modification to "like/same rail edits. Editing one component will modify all "same copiy" components.
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Yes. Use the tape measure tool to measure known distance. Immediately type the value it should be. Voila.
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On Thu, 26 Feb 2009 17:51:51 -0600, "MikeWhy"

...I would say just the word "dude!"...hey, maybe that *is* good enough. I'll give you guys an update in a couple of months...LOL...
cg

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Lee Michaels wrote:

Ask question at rec.crafts.metalworking.
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It's not a drafting tool. You'll bend over backwards to make it produce working drawings. Sketchup is more a modeling and visualization tool that happens to place a few dimensions and notes, sometimes usefully, sometimes not. It doesn't do angular dimensions, for example.
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Egggggzactly. NOT a drafting tool.
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Egggggzactly. NOT a drafting tool.
What is it you can do on a CAD program that you cannot on Sketchup?
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Where to start? Working drawing sets. Bills of Material. Parametric configurations. Multiple parts configurations. Editable feature history. Weldments. Sheet metal. Mate constraints. ... SU is a minimal set for defining and manipulating simple, static surface models. It is what it is, and it's good for what it is, but it helps sometimes to keep in perspective what it is not. What you sketch is what you get, sometimes less. Circles are pie wedges; curves are straightline segments. When you change a dimension, the dimension text changes, not the underlying object. You glue things together, or set them next to each other, they don't move to maintain the relationship. You sweep a shape, and that's the shape it will ever and always be; editing the shape that defined the sweep doesn't change anything. Is any of that a condemnation? I don't think so. "Minimum" usable subset is still a pretty high bar for getting useful things done.
So, about those angle dimensions. How?
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wrote in message>>

Well this being a ww group I was thinking more in lines with wood working projects. So yes I agree a CAD program absolutely does more outside this area.
As for as abilities, I have not checked all the plugins and scripst that are available however there is a dimension plug-in called Driving Dimensions that let you edit the dimension and that also changes the length of object that it deminsions.
I am not sure what you are talking about concerning glueing things or setting them next to each other and not maintaining the relationship. If you make them into components and make the components into a group they stay together until you edit or explode them. I may be way off base here.

Search for the script/plugin " dim_angle.rb ". Copy it into the Plug-in's folder and the next time you reload Sketchup 7 ;ppl imder "Tools" and you will find a new command called Angular Dimension. Choose that command, pick 3 points, and you will get a angular dimension typical of what you might expect. Keep in mind however that on this particular dimention that if you chang eht angle of the object you will also have todo the angular dimension command.
Scroll down the page a bit until you see the file I mentione above. Click the file name and it will open a page of script. Right click that page and "Save page As", and save it in the plug ins folder. Besure to add the .rb extension to the name if it does not do so automatically. http://www.crai.archi.fr/RubyLibraryDepot/Ruby/em_arc_page.htm
There are literally hundreds of scripts and plug ins that make Sketchup act more like a CAD program.
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"Leon" wrote

Careful now ... the bait is top water at six o'clock and getting close.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
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wrote in message

First, understand that I'm not interested in selling you a bigger CAD system. I'm doing the opposite, in fact. I'm working toward weaning myself onto SU alone. Just answering your question directly about what's in the other systems.

I'll believe it when I see it. It has less to do with cleverness than having the information on hand, after the fact in SU, to parameterize the part. I'm speaking of SolidWorks and Inventor. They maintain the history of how the features were made. If you extruded a profile 100", you can change that later to something else, or edit the sketch that defines the profile.
How to answer that? Just yesterday I tried explaining why components in SU are useful abstractions. There are different levels of understanding and need.

It comes up all the time. All the time. The bottom of this drawer sits on the top face of that cleat, and this face of its side is parallel to that face on that side panel. The back rail of the Morris chair rests on its tangent point with that peg; the peg's axis is concentric with this bored hole. The drawer face has a 1/16" gap from the face frame. When I resize or move things about, the objects size and relocate themselves to maintain those constraints.
Do you need it? SU isn't SW or Inventor. I'm still just trying to answer your question.

Thanks. And just how hard is that to do natively? There are big things missing, the stuff I mentioned above. That's cool; implementing them is magnitudes more complex than what SU is meant to be. But there are niggling little things, like the angle dimensions, that can be but aren't. Still, you have to understand that I'm not criticizing SU, and not asking you to be its apologist. It is what it is.
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Snip

I look at Sketch up as more of a "Kit", modify to your likes and needs programs. For me, it does 99.9% of what AutoCAD LT did in the last 12 years and adds the ability to assemble and disassemble a project in 3D perspective.
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"Leon" wrote

Damn, I never thought I'd see you switch from AutoCAD LT to anything else!
Just reaffirms my long held contention that SU is an excellent, cost effective, woodworker's tool providing you're not so closed minded as to let preconceived notions/bias get in the way.
Then again, the first three times I downloaded SU, then wiped it, I never thought in my wildest dreams I'd be using it, and it alone, to build a $300K budget house. That house is now well on it's way and the foundation, framing, electrical, plumbing, and HVAC were all bid from, and will be built, based solely on SU 2D and 3D drawings.
--
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I did the install and remove a few time my self. IMHO the program was a bit too cartoonist in the earlier versions. Version 6 was the one that seriously kept my interest and Version 7 seems to have addressed several behind the scenes problems. Yeah, I think AutoCAD LT has out grown its usefulness, price wise, for me. While the CAD programs do indeed have more tool commands and icons I feel the Sketchup has pretty much simplified those commands into a far smaller group that pretty much accomplish the same thing 99% of the time. I would like to see a few more dimension commands and or options to tweak the a bit more.
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Oh, for fuck sakes. Just because people are putting the obvious SU limitations out there for all to see, does not make them closed minded. You have made it clear that it works for you. Great. But I have a company to run, in which SU has no place due to its limitations. I also know you weren't referring specifically to me personally as you fully realize my mind is wide open and always eager to find newer, better software solutions... especially when low cost/free. But to suggest that one can build a 300K house with SU is misleading as you fail to include the fact that YOUR ability to do so includes your vast and well-developed skill-set. Your skill-set can build that house without SU, IOW, what you got there is a sharper, better pencil. Period.
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