"Rubbing Out"

Page 1 of 2  
Still working on my desktop, but I was away for the weekend and didn't get anything done (except the application of what should be the last coat). I've now got 5 coats of MinWax poly on it, the first one Semi and the rest Satin.
It *looks* pretty decent; a satin finish as would be expected. But I can still feel some little nibs. So what to do next?
Someone here suggested pumice and rottenstone. I did a little reading and I think I may try out those abrasives on something (smaller) sometime soon. But I read an article last night that suggested that the nibs I'm feeling could be smoothed out with 600 grit paper and paraffin oil. He wrote that if a Satin finish was what was desired, one could stop there, or proceed to finer abrasives.
Satin is what I'm looking for (I think), so it sounds like a good idea.
Except...
He says that poly tends to remain as separate layers; sanding through the top one leaves difficult-to-remove "witness marks". There are another couple of concepts in the article that seem fuzzy to me as well.
He doesn't mention how long to wait before starting the 600 grit work. Someone here suggested a month. The last coat went on on Saturday morning. I have plenty more work to do on the rest of the desk, so waiting shouldn't be too agonizing.
He says to fold a quarter sheet in thirds. I assume this means to use that little folded piece by hand, without a block. I guess I could do that, but it sounds like a pretty small bit to keep a grip on, and might be difficult to do an even job with as well. Could I use a bigger piece, or at least some sort of soft block?
He also says I'll need to remove the oil and dust periodically to see how I'm doing, which seems logical enough, but doesn't say how to do it. Just wipe? Use a chemical?
I'm thinking of giving the process a try on my test piece, which only has three coats of poly on it, but it's had a few weeks to cure. Are three coats too few? Any advice would be appreciated, including different methods entirely.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Guarino wrote:

This is a total "shot in the dark" but I would like someone to cover this while answering Greg's question.
In a situation like this, would buffing with "0000" steel wool and a good wax solve the problem. Being careful, of course, on the edges so you do not cut through.
Deb
Deb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't use poly, but I do use a rubbing varnish, Waterlox. Brushed on, finishes build up very quickly. Rubbed finishes are much thinner and I try to use 5 or more coats.
Nibs get removed with either a scraper blade, 320/400 grit sandpaper, or 0000 with J-wax. I like to wait weeks to months before the waxing, if any.
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/2011 1:56 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Before you try anything else, grab a grocery bag, cut some 8" "pads" out of them and rub out your finish with them.
Won't hurt a thing and may be all the abrasive you need.
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/2011 3:39 PM, Swingman wrote:

Interesting. In this day and age I think you might need to specify "paper" bags, which don't exist at our local supermarkets. I think I can still procure some though. Just a layer of paper under my fingers then? Or can I wrap it around something non-rigid?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/11 2:48 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Just treat it like you would superfine sandpaper. Block, pad, hands, whatever you'd use with buffing sandpaper.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/2011 2:48 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

ANY PAPER, I use printer paper, in particular the paper that my plans were on. Any paper will do but you don't want print to rub off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/2011 4:45 PM, Leon wrote:

BTY if you use a block of wood it distributes the work and it goes faster.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Butcher paper is cheap, clean, and the best thing for drawing full-size plans on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/2011 8:01 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

If you need full sized plans.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You need full sized plans to lay out and glue them onto your store-boughten boards before you cut by the numbers, right?
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/25/2011 7:45 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Other than for irregular shapes or large arcs I never could see the point to full sized plans. Imagine building a house with full sized plans. LOL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For guitars or guitar-sized objects, 1:1 is best.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Around my neck of the woods, the requisite paper can be obtained with a LCBO purchase. That makes it a double pleasure. Smooth out your tabletop and get drunk at the same time
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/11 2:39 PM, Swingman wrote:

I tried the grocery bag thing a while ago (there's a post somewhere) and I'll do it every time, form now on.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/2011 2:48 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

IIRC, guy named Jim Theile (sp) posted it here well over ten years ago, (1999 or 2000). I've been using it every since myself.
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yup, as good as 400 paper but 100% cheaper.
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/24/2011 1:56 PM, Greg Guarino wrote:

Do your self a favor and wrap a piece of paper around a piece of wood and rub the nibs off. It will take you no time at all and may astound you as to how well that works.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Naptha or mineral spirits are good wet-sanding fluids. Both wipe off clean.

Gray Scotchbrite pad is the fastest way to rub to satin. Not sure if pumice or rottenstone will bring up a high gloss on poly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 24 Oct 2011 14:55:39 -0700 (PDT), Father Haskell

Yeah, if it's only poly, it doesn't matter whether or not the finish is even. With Scotchbrite, it -never- is. Good steel wool, such as Liberon, is the only way to ensure an even scratch pattern. I love Scotchbrite and buy it by the box, but this is one place I never use it. One of the mags did a test and I confirmed it myself, then stopped using Scotchbrite for finishes, unless it's for complete _removal_ of a finish.
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.