RE: T/S Inertia

Page 7 of 9  

Some have a safety cover over the toggle switch to help prevent things accidentally clicking it on.
All I do is turn off the saw. I was making up a railing for a friend just yesterday and putting on the dado blade. He said don't you pull the cord... I don't. Never saw a light, appliance or power tool go on by itself. He said what if someone turns in on by accident? I said that would have to be me, and if I'm that freaking dumb, I deserve to lose an arm. I'm sure a switch has gone on by itself at least once somewhere, but in well over half a million hours of experience, I've not witnessed it, I asked him if he ever witnessed same, he said no, so thats well over one million hours of testing... so I live on the edge...
Geez, no guard, no splitter, no disconnect... Thrill a minute...
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At the same time, a useful feature is a paddle style knee switch to shut of a saw if your hands are occupied.
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My cheap router table, adapted from a circular saw inversion table, has a switch shut-off bar that runs the full length of the table, one side, and pushes on the rocker switch. It seems to be a good idea, and is better than a small buried, under the table, switch but I am not sure how readily accesible it would be in event of a mishap.
It may be easier to hit after dropping to the floor after scanning for flying parts, though....LOL

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Some things you get to know when to walk away and know when to run just by sound alone. I know the sound of a blank coming off a lathe chuck, or the sound of a bowl about to shatter. Left hand hits the switch while diving out of the line of fire!
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Lobby Dosser wrote:

Sure. All new saws come with blade guards and the guards receive about as much attention as the sixteen-page safety manuals that also accompany a new saw.
Like the safety manuals, the blade guards are included with a new saw for the company's benefit, not the consumers'.
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You mean the one that says that the saw is not for internal use?

I must be the odd-man-out here. I often use the blade guard. I'll put it on if I plan on doing a lot of ripping and what I'm ripping isn't too narrow. IOW, if the guard is more use than it is hindrance.
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These are not mutually exclusive. The problem is that safety equipment and ease of operation do seem to be mutually exclusive - except for the SawStop. Then it's safety and affordability are mutually exclusive. For now.
It's the same as seatbelts in a car. As a kid I used to bitch and moan when my Mom would insist I put on the seatbelt. Then it became a habit and I didn't even think about it. I'd be dead twice or thrice over if it weren't for seatbelts
R
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Watch what happens if the SawStop technology is forced on high school and smaller tech schools. Our high school just dropped the woodworking program because the lawyer told them to add SawStop technology or close the program. They had finally upgraded to a couple of new Powermatics after nearly 30 years with now worn out Unisaws. Couldn't afford to upgrade again so they sold the shop off.
RonB
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SawStop is a game changer, no doubt about that. Losing high school shop programs is totally unacceptable. My HS sucked - we didn't have any shop programs at all. I used to drool over the things my older brother would bring back from shop class at his high school. I wonder sometimes how different my life would be if there had been a wood shop. Maybe nothing would have changed, I don't know. Maybe I would just have had better training and several more years of experience.
R
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Agree - As the original poster noted most good schools press safety. We will have more folks starting off with little if any training.
Ron
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With less emphasis on safety. Shame
Max
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wrote:

These are not mutually exclusive. The problem is that safety equipment and ease of operation do seem to be mutually exclusive - except for the SawStop. Then it's safety and affordability are mutually exclusive. For now.
It's the same as seatbelts in a car. As a kid I used to bitch and moan when my Mom would insist I put on the seatbelt. Then it became a habit and I didn't even think about it. I'd be dead twice or thrice over if it weren't for seatbelts
You must be a young guy. When I was a kid, they didn't have seat belts.
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wrote:

These are not mutually exclusive. The problem is that safety equipment and ease of operation do seem to be mutually exclusive - except for the SawStop. Then it's safety and affordability are mutually exclusive. For now. ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Not really. If you use the tool to make a living, its purchase is deductable. That trip to the ER, whether by you or an employee, means you can't afford Not to buy one.
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That's a rather strange idea. I understand that telling you not to use the hedge clippers to cut junior's hair is there purely for legal pre-emption, but there is surely Some meat in the safety instructions. And as far as the blade guards go, I've never had a problem with them and remove mine only for the obvious reasons. Granted I am not doing woodworking for a living or even as a significant part time avocation, but I think if I were doing it for a living I'd pay even more attention to safety. Familiarity does breed forgetfulness.
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It seem so me that one reason why people discard the crown guard (hood, Murricans) is the following ( http://tinyurl.com/382fe4c )
1910.213(c)(1)
'The hood and mounting shall be arranged so that the hood will automatically adjust itself to the thickness of and remain in contact with the material being cut but it shall not offer any considerable resistance to insertion of material to saw or to passage of the material being sawed.'
Of the few I've tried, this is darned near impossible to get the hood to automatically be elevated by the leading edge of the job if one is sawing material of varying thicknesses, so it is not surprising that people get fed up with them.
There's a pic of an ideal(?) but darned expensive and difficult-to-fit guard at the foot of http://tinyurl.com/pywalm
Jeff
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On 8/8/2010 1:10 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I had not thought of it as a safety precaution, but have been doing that for years to protect the blade.
As you move the fence, change miter gauge, etc. there is always a chance that the blade will get whacked, unless the practice is to lower it when done with one set up.
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Talk to Leon about exposed, coasting blades.
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;~) Well I am not going to lower the blade when I turn the saw off but will for the sake of protecting the fence or miter gage or any thing else from damaging the blade if I finished using the saw.
BUT now I don't do any thing around the blade until I watch it come to a complete stop.
During cutting operations I have never been hurt by not using a guard. I have been hurt 3 times when using a guard. this is absolutely not to say however that I will not be hurt in the future by not using a guard.
IIRC there was an Italian manufacutrer that built a saw that would drop the blade below the surface automatically when you turned the motor off. IIRC you had to raise a lever to reposition the blade and turn the saw back on. Unplug the saw to make height adjustments.
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Sawstop
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Electric brake -- short out the supply wires after cutting the power, and the motor forces itself to stop.
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