OT: Why General Motors is doomed

Page 5 of 6  

wrote:

I don't know about your world, but in my world, people buy a car that will fill *all* of their needs, they don't have a specific car for each specific task. So, when they need a vehicle with hauling capacity for family trips, weekend family activities, and commuting, they pick a car for which the features intersect with all of their driving requirements. Just because *you* see one driver in an SUV commuting to work on weekdays doesn't mean that the same vehicle isn't carrying the family and luggage out of state next week, or being used to haul a soccer team and equipment to the field this weekend.

That's the nice thing about our society, people can choose the solutions that work for *them*.

So, is that fact, opinion, feeling, or belief?

Your world must look a lot different than mine. It's the little, underpowered cars that are having trouble getting onto the highway while those with sufficient power are merging into traffic with ease.
Now, in my world, I have always wondered why cadillacs are so highly powered; I've never seen one being driven faster than 45 MPH anywhere. :-)

... and studies and surveys can be designed to return the answers that the person conducting the study wishes to see.

Not sure that says anything other than that people did not want to appear to come across to an "authority" figure looking like they weren't doing everything possible to save energy when that was the politically correct thing to do. Also depends on who was being surveyed, etc. If you are trying to say the 75% of all car owners in the US would have answered that way, that's a stretch to say the least.

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Mark & Juanita wrote:

Why satisfy _all_ of your need when most of your needs can be satisfied with something less wasteful and an occasional rental will satisfy the rest?
I know grandparents that buy a huge SUV 'cause the grandkids visit for a week once a year.
The fact is that people buy to meet their _perceived_ needs, not their real needs.
> ... and studies and surveys can be designed to return the answers that > the person conducting the study wishes to see.
Sounds like you're getting paranoid.

If you want to see what Americans are really like, see "Talking To Americans". The average American has a strongly held opinion on everything, including things they know nothing about. It's part of the culture of confidence and optimism. That's why so many Americans can ignore the facts and form opinions that have nothing to do with reality.
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

And of course you think that you are an exception.
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While your statement is trued, what we pick in North America is far different that what the Asians and Europeans use to achieve the same goal. A family in England will load up the Cooper, the Italians will load up the Fiat and off they go. Of course, the Germans used the Borgward and had lots of room.
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

...
.....
That's the _only_ reasonable estimation of a car.... :)

...
And to the folks who made the choice I'm sure it looked very much like a good choice. The point is when you place another set of values on the choice other than the buyer's, then you obviously aren't always going to agree on the level of "goodnes" in those choices, by definition.
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. The little

==========Mike: Sorry Mike... BUT the above comment is just plain wrong...
I can not think of a single vehicle (sports car or not) made in the 50's that could "out handle" ANY modern vehicle..
I had my fair share of 50's sport cars...along with 60's and 70's and currently have five 60 and 70 era sports cars in my garage along with a 2 years old sports car...
Fact is my 2000 Pickup truck will "out handle" any of the older sports cars.. Modern tires and suspension systems are just light years ahead of the technology availabe 40-50 years ago...
As for Horsepower... well I do own cars with more then 300 HP but honestly I have not needed any more then that in at least the last day or too...
Bob G.
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On Thu, 20 Jul 2006 10:54:47 -0400, Bob G.

That was my thinking too. I think my father in law's Cadillac STS Northstar would kick my 69 Corvette's ass ... but I wouldn't tell him that ;-)
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On Thu, 20 Jul 2006 12:52:33 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

LOL.... But I sure would not wave at him in the STS your shark would get a wave everytime.
Bob G. .
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Deliberately ignoring your other post about batteries, I said "hybrid cars" NOT hybrid technology. (Locomotives and ships use hybrid technologies.) As for the Prius, and the other crop of hybrid cars, the people who drive them like them - for now. Wait until they need major service or when they try to re-sell them in the future (3-6 years).
We sell the Honda Hybrid and the main reason they buy them is, "so I can drive in the carpool lane by myself". Not one the main three hybrids, VW, Prius or the Civic have the horsepower of the standard engine counterpart and the mileage difference will pay for the cost difference in a few years of ownership.
Currently the newest - latest and greatest DAFC is only about 45% efficient and a long way from use in our cars. The best, most efficient method is moving to blended fuels, (Ethanol/gasoline) like Brazil has done and converting to biodiesel for trucks. The big hurdle for ethanol fuels is distribution and water separation systems that make it still to costly to implement nationally. Maybe when oil crosses the $100 a barrel it will make sense.
Dave (Hoping for room-temperature superconductivity and a method to render radio-active waste inert!)
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Teamcasa wrote:

The only locomotive I've heard of is a shunt engine for rail yards. There's no real advantage for long distance rail travel.

And people drive SUV's because they are big, not because they are needed. There are a lot of Priuses in my town and they aren't being purchased for carpool lanes - there are too few for that to be a justification. Every person I know buys one because they want a more fuel efficient vehicle.

That's more efficient than current H2 technology and way more efficient than an internal combustion engine. Since the focus of fuel cell technology is H2 (i.e. the US Congress' stupid alternative energy bill recently passed) , they may never succeed at producing auto-ready DAFC on an even playing field.

If they use (heavily subsidized and energy intensive) corn and sugar based ethanol, no. If they go with cellulose ethanol from low-grade crops, yes. Hybrid will make this even better. I can't think of a single reason why hybrid is not a good idea; it's simple technology with a big benefit.

It's nice to dream.
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

You just blew your credibility.

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J. Clarke wrote:

Nice to see all those facts you presented. Are you reading the press releases that Ballard puts out that make _predictions_ on what they will have for efficiency someday?
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

You mean that Ballard is not achieving the same efficiency as Pratt & Whitney was delivering 40 years ago? Pity, they need to work on that.
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So, if electric cars are the salvation, where's the electricity coming from? California had "rolling blackouts" last year, so I guess that if we double (or triple) the demand for electricity, the government will figure out how to "FIX" the problem? Oh wait, I forgot, it's probably a conspiracy......
Maybe if people just tried to think things through before they start whinning....but no, that'll NEVER happen....

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On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 11:22:34 -0400, "Bruce T"

I love the environmental groups that don't talk to each other. Some groups hate power plants and fight tooth and nail against them. Other groups hate the internal combustion engine and do everything they can to switch everyone to electric cars.
I guess those people think electricity just pours out of those two (or 3) holes in the wall.
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I am really surprised that the tax and spend folks are not charging an excise tax on electric cars. That power you are using is not assessing a "road tax" like petroleum fuels. From a tax standpoint it is like burning home heating oil in your diesel car.
It is making me look at an electric tho. I don't drive very far from home so I don't need a lot of range.
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Oh, I think they talk to each other. The dirty little secret of the radical environmental movement is that they are only going to be satisfied when *no* new power is being generated or distributed (except of course the energy that *they* need). The rest of us are supposed to live in environmentally friendly mud huts, living in harmony with nature in a subsistence agrarian society.
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George Max wrote:

This was my thought also. People saying hydro is going to help solve our power needs should talk to the folks in Idaho who are continually wanting to tear down the dams here because of the effects on the environment, salmon and other upstream habitats. There are environmentalists all around Hite, Utah who are NOT big fans of hydro power...
Also, GM has 1000's of employees on full salary in job banks - some haven't been near a auto manufacturing line in years, but the union says they can't be fired even though GM needs to shed excess employees off the payroll. Any company that is not allowed to make it's own business decisions is doomed.
Matt
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I saw an ad for a new extension cord for charging your electric car. It increases the distance traveled by 20% and charges in half the time, Yes, the Supercharger Cord is the future. The electric companies have know about this miracle cord for years, but, of course, they are interested in making money so they've been keeping it off the market.
Send $199.95 for your new Supercharger Cord and Supercharge your batteries,
But wait . . . . .there's more. If you order today, well give you an no extra charge the Supercharger for cordless power tools. just pay shipping and handling, of $29.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Nahh, don't buy that piece of junk, by the Monster Cable SuperDuperCharger with oxygen-free copper and fine stranding for more surface effect for only 1999.50.
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