Mistakes or sloppy work

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You mean the uneducated, untrained, unskilled employees who are lucky they have jobs at all? They don't deserve benefits, they haven't earned them.
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The key word is unskilled. If an employee doesn't like the low pay, then he or she should learn a trade or go to night school. If you ask anyone that has worked in retail for more than a year, Walmart is not the only one to offer very poor health insurance. However the rest of our benefits were pretty decent when I worked at the Crapsman house.
I'm not a big fan of RTA furniture, but it does serve its purpose in certain situations. Kids rooms is a big one. That way I don't keep thinking of how much time I have in making something to have it trashed in a few months.
Allen
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On the benefits issue, which would you prefer, no benefits or poverty level wages? Wait! Wal-Mart provides both! :-)
On another note, I love waking through stores looking at furniture. It can be rewarding or condemning. Sometimes I'm checking to see if I can beat craftsmanship (usually not too hard in discount stores) or whether I can build better for less. Other times I study their construction techniques, joinery, finish, etc. Same with catalogues. I think one of the great rewards with woodworking is that you find, after practice, you can build the same quality or better (sometimes exponentially better) than what you can buy and that it came from your own hands. If there's anything good for America I really think it is the spirit of woodworking. Wait, I'm getting verklempt. Talk amongst yourselves. . . . I'll give you a new topic. The Italian Neo Realist Movement in film was neither Italian nor neo nor particuarly a movement. Discuss!
snipped-for-privacy@mts.net wrote:

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Here's at least one on-topic response to your observation:
The Wal-Mart where I shop has a small collection of furniture, usually low cost and assemble-it-yourself type. Most of it is adequate quality but as you found out, there are exceptions. I bought a good quality hi-fi shelf unit for $79, whereas the identical unit was selling at Best Buy for $250.
Regards, Key Bored

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You are mistaken. Wal-Mart does not sell furniture. You went down their "Reclaimed for Firewood Isle".
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On Thu, 16 Nov 2006 15:09:21 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@mts.net wrote:

I feel that's a poor way of looking at things, Pete. Go out and find the worst presentation of things so you can feel better about your own shortcomings? I'd hate to think what will happen if you are exposed to a prison. I try to look the other direction. When I was younger I spent many hours at the library. I was not checking out books but studying the woodwork. My hometown had a library with elaborate oak molding that ran into shelving, readng desks, window trim and a small set of stairs. I was in awe of the carpenter who did the work. I worked so hard to make my work measure up. Even when carpenters look at my work and compliment, I am not satisfied because I know where the flaws are - and they are always there if perfection is our only standard.
J
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Agree, I think that attitude is the mark of the better carpenter. At times when I've received compliments on some of the things I've made, I always known there's some imperfection somewhere and constantly strive not to repeat that type of imperfection again. If we're not always improving ourselves, then we're either stagnant or getting worse.
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On Fri, 17 Nov 2006 05:32:16 -0500, Joe Bemier

I have to laugh. This thread has taken on a whole new dimension. I was merely making an observation about something I saw at a time when I was thinking about my own work. Perhaps I should have said 'go wandering though furniture stores'.
When I can see all the goofs in my work that I don't charge money for (the work not the goofs) and then see the crap being sold for money, I begin to rethink how I see my work. This is not an excuse to stagnate nor feel that my mistakes are OK but a wake up to stop being so hard on myself. My work will always improve and I try to avoid making the same mistakes twice, but only when I remember what the original problem was. I only need to put out good work not perfection.
As for my shortcomings, I have plenty just like you and everone else. I don't need you or anyone else to point them out to me because that's my job and I can do that much better than you. And what the hell does any of this have to do with prison?
These days I rarely go through life thinking I can do things as good or better as another man's work. This particular chest was an exception.
Pete
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SWMBO used to remind me as we paid for good lumber and fittings that almost anything I made was going to be better than store-bought. True way back, and hasn't changed.
OTOH, all the Wally World bashers need to stop and think. Who shops at the store? Poor people? Aren't we all about helping the poor? Why force them to shop elsewhere or do without.
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On Thu, 16 Nov 2006 15:09:21 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@mts.net wrote:

If you want a real ego boost, go to a Pier One store- all the defects you've described, with a much higher price tag!
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I find that I am my own worst critic. I see plenty of stuff and wonder how the he** can they sell that for some gosh awful price tag. I see that stuff and agree with the wifey ... mine is much higher quality and I usually just give the stuff away. I'm in for the hobby not the dollars. The satisfactions are in the completed process and watching the smile come on a face. Thom
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I think that is as it should be. I only compare my work to superior work - work that impresses me. There's enough satisfaction in doing the work itself that I don't need validation comparing my work to inferior work. Don't get me wrong - I have no problem bitching about inferior work and inflated price tags on inferior work.
R
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On Fri, 17 Nov 2006 05:27:06 -0600, Prometheus

Exactly. I have a friend who is a manager for Pier One in Washington and she says they're having a heck of a time because most people are saying screw it, they can buy the same quality furniture at 1/2 the price at Walmart and other discounters, why bother going to Pier One?
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I have absolutely no problem with Wal-Mart driving businesses out of the "cheap crap"market.
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I don't either. Read the book "The Tipping Point" by Gladstone if you haven't already. One of his points is that it's not a race to the bottom.
R
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wrote:

Thanks!
I'm going to look up that book. I totally agree that big-box stores are quite easy to compete against if you aren't competing on price alone, and have many friends who have been very successful in doing so.
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B A R R Y wrote:

I definitely recommend Gladstone's book...unfortunately that was not the book that had the information I was referring to. The book I should have referenced is, "The World Is Flat", by Thomas Friedman. (Amazon.com product link shortened)63887724/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/104-6499016-3745560?ie=UTF8&s=books
Gladstone's book: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tipping_Point_(book)
R
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wrote:

Thanks again.
I already have Gladstone's book on reserve at my library. Now, I'll log on and request Friedman's.
Ain't online card catalogs great? <G>
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I've found that I often learn as much or more from the debunking than an original work.
Occasionally, Usenet discussions can be similar. Somebody posts something, the resulting back-and-forth discussion is where I pick up the real knowledge.
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wrote:

Yes, I also feel that is so true. Discussion also makes us think in more depth than reading might.
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