how do you replace the blade on a circular saw?

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i have a craftsman 7.25" saw and cant figure out how to remove and replace the blade. any help would be appreciated!
thanks.
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On 28 Jun 2004 00:17:36 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (c a) wrote:

Remember it loosens clockwise. You may need to use a screwdriver in the saw teeth to hold the blade if the saw doesn't have a blade lock.
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eeeeeeekkkk! Screwdriver?
Lumpa wood?

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A box-end wrench or a socket would be a better choice, as they grip the bolt tighter than a crescent wrench will, and thus have less risk of slipping and banging your knuckles, or rounding off the bolt head.

Ummmm... no, it doesn't, not if the blade is on the right, anyway.

That's really a pretty bad idea. A block of scrap wood is far better.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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Wrong. Loosen the nut or bolt in the direction that the blade turns.
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I also recommended the screwdriver because if there are times, especially if you bought an old second hand job, that wood just won't hold and you can hurt yourself. I once had to drill a hole in a rusty plywood blade to get it off, even after 3 days of applying assorted rust lifters like WD40.
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Yeah.. ;~) that is what I kept telling my 2 year old son. If you use your right hand it will all make sense. He still uses his left hand 15 years later.
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Or you have a left-blade saw, like my Skil HD77. Good thing thing they put little arrows on the nut to inform the folks who aren't used to it. Not quite an automatic reflex if you're going from one saw to another.
GTO(John)
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Gaaawd - I love the smell of a good Craftsman string in the morning!!!
Oh hell - Ill Jump In. I just replaced the brushes in a 35 year old Craftsman circular saw. I believe this was the first set. On the shelf next to it is a 32 year old Craftsman Scroll Saw and similar vintage belt sander. All good tools that seem to last forever, if you install enough replacement cords and plugs. I have a set of Craftsman hand tools that were given to me by in-laws nearly 38 years ago and a 1956 vintage Craftsman 4" Jointer that is built like a fire plug and works fine. I used to go to Sears anytime I needed a tool. That was 25-35 years ago.
Would I buy a Craftsman tool today - Probably not. Sometime during the past 25 years or so, they turned their backs on their loyal following.
Yes their hand tools are still good, but why pay 2 to 3 times the price of a Master Mechanic socket set with exactly the same warranty - lifetime!
About 20 to 25 years ago they started selling gaseous features like 1 HP motors with 2HP starting power - excuse me, but I cut after the saw blade comes up to speed. Also digital readouts for table saws that didn't even work on the store floor. In my opinion this kind of marketing was a direct insult to intelligent customers like us.
Has anyone looked at their new line of lathes or their so-called cabinet saw? They seem to cost as much as the competition. Are serious woodworkers buying these stylized plastic laden tools?
I think Sears positioned themselve so serve the consumer who wanted a tool NOW, didn't have cash available but did have a Sears charge account. That Worked for a while.
It is particularly telling that Sears is now selling Jet machinery. Wonder why?
Enough
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On some blades there actually are 2 small holes - specifically for placing a screwdriver shaft through. Does not hurt the teeth and a lot easier than using a block of wood. But if you don't have the small ~1/4" holes near the outer edge of the blade - then use the block of wood.
Bob S.

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Whatever direction the blade turns when running, that's the direction you turn the nut to loosen it. You'll probably need to lock the blade to loosen the nut. A piece of wood in a gullet or something strong enough to hold the blade in place will be needed. Try not to damage the teeth on the blade.
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An impact wrench does a great job on loosening these bolts. You don't need a screwdriver, block of wood or blade lock.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (c a) wrote in message

Method A:
Tools needed:
Roto-zip with metal-cutting burr J-B Weld Straightedge and marker Ball-peen hammer, Vise-grip pliers
Instructions:
Unplug the circular saw. Safety first, pumpkin.
Use the straightedge and marker to mark a straight line across the blade that goes through the center (diameter line) Ensure that the line begins and ends between teeth of the blade. It is recommended that you use a Starrett straightedge for this procedure. Any innacuracies caused by using such crude devices as a plain old ruler are at your own risk.
Use the roto-zip to _carefully_ cut through the blade along this line. The arbor nut may make cutting all the way to the center impossible. If this is the case, remove the arbor nut to access the center. "Left to loose"
With the blade guard held in the open position, carefully pull one half of the blade out of the saw. Be careful as the teeth of the blade are sharp and may poke you. For added safety, wear welding gloves during this operation.
Rotate the second half of the blade around and remove it in the same manner as the first half. If the blade gets stuck while rotating, plug the saw back in and quickly pull and release the trigger to dislodge. If this is necessary, you should wear a face shield and kevlar vest. These can be purchased at Harbor Freight for $6.98.
Using the metal-cutting tool of your choice, cut the new blade in half, being sure to cut in between the teeth of the blade rather than directly on a tooth. Alternatively, you can set half the blade in a vice and bend the other half back and forth until it breaks loose.
Insert the new blade in the saw in the opposite manner as described when removing the blade. If you plugged the saw in to remove the blade, you may wish to unplug the saw at this time. Be sure to wear welding gloves as the teeth of the blade are sharp.
Mix up the two tubes of J-B weld as described on the package. If you are still wearing welding gloves, remove them and put on cute leather driving gloves. You know, the kind with knuckle holes.
Use the J-B weld to glue the two halfs of the blade together. If you are having trouble spreading the epoxy, use an exposed knuckle to work the epoxy into the joint.
When drying is complete use the ball-peen hammer and/or vise grip pliers to straighten the blade. Be careful not to damage the blade guard during this operation. It will be needed later.
If you have previously removed the arbor nut, replace it at this time. "Right to tight"
Before you use the power tool, lets take a moment to talk about shop safety. Be sure to read, follow, and understand the instructions that came with your tool. And remember, the is no more important rule that to wear these, safety glasses.
Make a test cut in the heel of your shoe. Ensure that the depth of the saw cut will not penetrate your sole. If you lose your sole, consult you priest, minister, emam, and/or rabbi.
Method B:
RTFM.
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I can't belive no one has said it yet. You throw away the crapsman and replace it with a PC, DeWalt, Makita or any other DECENT saw.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (c a) wrote in message

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What the heck for?? The all work, they all cut. Why throw away a perfectly good tool and spend good money on another because of some anal mentality towards CRAFTSMAN products.
Stupid advice like that sucks, IMHO.
NOW, ask me how I REALLY feel.
:)

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Vic,
Glad you're happy with your Craftsman woodworking tools. Over the years, I've had a number of Crapsman tools (tablesaw, routers, jointer, drills, etc.) and everyone of them either burned out or otherwise self destructed in some fashion. Other than some non-powered hand tools (screwdrivers, wrenches) I kept only the jointer (dead motor) around to use as a weight when doing large glueups. With that kind of track record, do you really think anyone can recommend them?
So the advice doesn't suck at all....
Bob S.

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I have a Craftsman circular saw and as soon as it breaks I will promise to buy something you folks approve of but I can't seem to break it. Last week I burned up 3 masonry blades trying but no joy, it keeps on going. :-)
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On 29 Jun 2004 00:34:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) wrote:

Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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On 29 Jun 2004 00:34:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) wrote:

Greg,
Me too. I keep wanting to get a GOOD circular saw, but my innate stinginess won't let me spend the money as long as my Craftsman 7 1/4 keeps spinning the blade. Only thing I've had to fix on it was to replace the cord when I ran the blade through it several years ago. You'd think after almost 40 years it would be about worn out, but nooo... Don'tlook like I'm ever gonna be able to buy a good saw.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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I think the problem is these folks are buying new Sears tools, not the ones they made in the Johnson administration. BTW the cord on mine is just a lot shorter than it was, with a replacement plug ;-)
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