Square D electrical panel question

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On Saturday, March 5, 2016 at 7:37:39 AM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

What he posted is still wrong, after he's had an opportunity to review it several time. He keeps saying a service disconnect that isn't the main breaker in the panel has to be on a pole, which it does not. But heh, he won't listen to me because I'm supposed to be a jerk.
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On Fri, 4 Mar 2016 07:00:09 -0500, Stormin Mormon

In better than 90% of installations that main breaker IS the main disconnect, and as far as the code is concerned unless it is a sub-panel the original explanation is correct. Neutral is bonded to ground.
Be a lot safer to leave it alone than to have micky playing around with it anyway.
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On Friday, March 4, 2016 at 5:33:48 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The question wasn't posed by Micky, it was posed by Stormin.
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On Fri, 4 Mar 2016 14:40:09 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

Thanks. I answered before I saw this.
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wrote:

And it's more scary knowing that!!
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On Fri, 4 Mar 2016 14:40:09 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

And that doesn't improve the odds.
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DerbyDad03 posted for all of us...

Oh man, put the FD on stand by.
--
Tekkie

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On Fri, 04 Mar 2016 17:33:06 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Hey, I never said that. I said I made the earth move for my girlfriend, when we were...you know; not for a breaker box.
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wrote:

Sorry about that.
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"Stormin Mormon" wrote in message
I noticed a friends's Square D panel, the neutral and ground (from the utility company feed) are connected to the same bar. And less than an inch apart.
ABOVE: That is correct "HOWEVER" once you start to distribute power to receptacles lights ETC. The ground most not at any time carry any current, your Neutral is tied to ground block "but" it will be isolated from the ground after that point and it most remain that way, and it will carry current from that point. Also remember what I said the ground does not carry any current, however that is only "AFTER" distribution panel. Coming into distribution panel yes at the time could become hot, depend where is grounded and on how many places is grounded. "NEVER disconnect ground with power being on, on incoming line to the distribution panel, because panel itself can become hot.
Shouldn't the ground be connected to the separate ground bar?
Should I move the ground wire?
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On 3/4/2016 9:41 PM, Tony944 wrote:

gets some corrosion, the current may go to the grounds. I'm also concerned that the grounds go to two ground bars (some what like the neutral bars) and the ground bars may be not connected to any thing useful like the service entrance ground. At least one outlet I checked shows open ground.] your Neutral

concerned there may be corrosion or open neutral at some point. And I need to check a couple other outlets to see if every outlet in the house has open ground.] depend where is grounded and on

Center posted as a courtesy.
. Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
Tony944
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I'm in the UK, so I don't know how your systems work. But my house only has TWO wires coming into it. 240V and 0V. Neutral and ground are both connected to the 0V line, which is an earth spike at the 11kV to 240V substation (transformer) across the road.
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Over here in the colonies we take that 240v and center tap the transformer so both ungrounded legs are 120v above ground. That still gives us the ability to use 240v equipment but most ends up being 120v. I suppose we can blame Thomas Edison for that. He started a fear campaign against Nick Tesla over AC current, Edison wanted DC and he said AC was more deadly, to the point of electrocuting an elephant along with more than a few condemned prisoners ... all with AC. When he lost the war, the deadly part still stuck and the belief was that 120 would be safer, still leaving the option of having 240v equipment.
It is interesting that you only have 11kva transformers. Typically here, a single home would be on a 25kva, the smallest generally available. Two houses get a 37 and 3 houses would get a 50. That is about the max on a single transformer. Distribution will be 13kv to ground (3 p wye)
This is a 50
http://gfretwell.com/electrical/50%20KVA%20transformer.jpg
This is the typical installation
http://gfretwell.com/electrical/transformer.jpg
You can see 2 of the 3 drops going off to the houses
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On Saturday, March 5, 2016 at 2:50:39 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

And those 50's blow up quite spectacularly during ice storms.
5 days without power. Gave me the chance to start the aquarium over from scratch. :-(
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What is an "ice storm"? Is that the same as a "hail storm"? Our transformers never seem to break.

Surely you could have found enough juice to heat an aquarium?
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The ice storm is when the rain fall out of the sky and freezes on the power lines and trees. It can build up to several inches in diameter. Often the ice is more than the tree or some of the big limbs can stand and they break and fall across the power lines. Sometimes could be called freezing rain.
Unlike hail that is already frozen and does not usually stick to the wires and trees. Hail can be large enough to damage things but does not usually take out the power lines.
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That's very odd and seems to be against the laws of physics. If it's below freezing on the branches, how come it's above freezing higher up (where you'd expect it to be colder) causing rain and not hail?
The only time we get too much weight on branches is in colder parts (North Scotland) where SNOW falls on things. Snow has the ability to stick of course, and builds up.
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This ice thing happens when the temp is hovering around 0c. the rain mixed with snow (aka the dreaded "sleet and freezing rain") accumulates on ice that is already there and freezes creating another layer. It is just a strange thing that doesn't make as much sense as you would like but seeing a CM coating of ice on anything that it lands on makes it a reality. These things can be quite beautiful until stuff starts breaking. Imagine a forest of trees apparently made of glass. On a full moon night it is breath taking. The biggest part of the electrical problem is the reluctance of northern folks to cut back trees around power lines. Down here in Florida they are very aggressive about eliminating anything growing in the right of way. You really do not own the land in front of your house within about 3m of the road (where the power lines run) and the power company has the power to cut anything that encroaches into that space. They do. People accept it because of the number of wind storms we have. The power companies are really working to get as much as this as they can, underground. Around here, the phone company is already there and my landline is actually more reliable than the cell after a hurricane. I have never lost it in 32 years.
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wrote:

Around here I don't think it is because of the people,but the power company does not want to spend the money to do the cutting. Years ago they used to cut trees all the time, but quit and the trees grew up and the power has been a problem.
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On Sun, 06 Mar 2016 11:56:27 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Up here in "the north" you don't need trees to take down wires in ice storms. When the wire is 2 1/2 inches in diameter from ice buildup, it doesn't take much to snap the wires (or even the poles if a good wing comes up) One reason much of our "secondary" distribution is underground - along with many of the distribution transformers.

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