How to truck 1,000 gallons of potable water to a residence

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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 10:06:14 -0400:

Well, there are all types. For example, the woman who ran out of water just divorced from her husband about two years ago, and she got the house and kids so she's actually renting her additional cottage on the property to another ex homeowner who lost his home down the street to the bank. So, she's not retured.
Yet, others own multiple companies, and the only ones going up and down the hill are their landscapers and repairmen.
The majority are independently wealthy (except me, as I've retired, but I may have to reconsider my options), but some are people who have been here for 40 years, and they must have bought when prices were less than a million so their taxes aren't killing them like mine are killing me! :)
I just got an update from the divorced lady. She is contracting out to get her rather shallow (only 300 feet) well drilled deeper. The next in line is a lady whose husband recently died, and her house is under foreclosure.
Her well (as is mine) is tripping every few minutes, so, she's conserving water (as am I) and hoping the water supply lasts until the next forcasted rain (which will come in October or November).
As for me, I filled the pool, so, "my" supply, while intermittent, was good enough to last, but, there are vineyards here which must be using a LOT of water ... so it may simply be a matter of location.
I don't know, but, for me, and for those without the ready capital to drill deeper, I'd go for the temporary solution of trucking the water up the hill.
The sloshing tipping over the truck seems to me to be a very real concern that I hadn't considered, because, there is no guardrail, and you're going down a slope that doesn't end for thousands of vertical feet, so, it would behoove us to better understand the sloshing effect on a pickup truck filled with a 1,000 gallons of water in a tank.
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On 6/28/2014 12:18 PM, DannyD. wrote:

CY: Since no one in the area has water, maybe that's a waste of money, to drill deeper into dry earth?

CY: That's a long time to wait.

CY: Wonder if the vineyards people would consider some money to divert the water to local homes?

CY: Might be the answer. Sounds like it would be rough on the vehicles, drivers, etc.

CY: Worth knowing. I've heard that full tank is much less of an issue.
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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 07:53:30 -0400:

I always wondered how much of that lost fuel mileage you get back on the downhill drive, which is done essentially in neutral for the entire 5 miles.
I realize it won't exactly cancel out, but, essentially you get 100mpg (or whatever) on the downhill drive; while you probably get something like half your city mpg on the uphill climb.
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On 6/28/2014 12:20 PM, DannyD. wrote:

Don't know. I'd dare to guess you will go through rear axles and transmissions at rapid rate. Rented truck might be best.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Saturday, June 28, 2014 10:57:08 AM UTC-7, Stormin Mormon wrote:


Why would that be? They are built for "work" use in a truck. I'm a farm b oy fro wayi back and don't ever recall us losing an axle or tranny even dri ving the old junkers we used to (first one was a 34 chev 1 1/2 ton. I have been hauling overloads of firewood on my 62 1/2 ton, 68 1/2 ton (both junk ed due to worn out motors) and currently 89 F150 since 1976 with no tranny/ axle problems.
Mountain roads? Spent two years hauling up to 7ton loads up down a 7 mile mountain grade with 8 and 9% grades with a KB5, no problems.
Harry K
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On 6/29/2014 10:29 AM, Harry K wrote:

truck. I'm a farm boy fro wayi back and don't ever recall us losing an axle or tranny even driving the old junkers we used to (first one was a 34 chev 1 1/2 ton. I have been hauling overloads of firewood on my 62 1/2 ton, 68 1/2 ton (both junked due to worn out motors) and currently 89 F150 since 1976 with no tranny/axle problems.

up down a 7 mile mountain grade with 8 and 9% grades with a KB5, no problems.

I'm glad you've had a good experience. Mine, not as good. I seldom do hills, but each of my vehicles has needed a TX or clutch at some point.
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trader_4 wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 04:54:16 -0700:

I just found out that the divorced lady who has run out of water is sharing the well with the lady whose husband recently died. They have separate tanks, so, it's just a matter of time before the second lady has the problem.
Both have young kids, and not much by way of finances (other than the huge illiquid equity presumed to be in the homes). The plan, I'm told, is to drill deeper (but that plastic vs steel casing may be an issue).
Luckily, the divorced lady has her ex to back her up, so I think the plan is to cut the single mother a break, at least until the home is foreclosed on (which takes about a year). It's currently up for sale, but there are no takers that I know of.
It's hard to help them, as I'm out of my league when it comes to this stuff, having never owned a home with a well before the current one, and, well, when the well works, it just works. So I don't know much more about it other than watching the little block of wood go up and down.
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which side of San Jose is this neighborhood?
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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 08:05:11 -0400:

I'm *not* by any means an expert. So, what I tell you is just what I happen to observe or hear.
In "my" case, I have two wells. I don't remember what the initial inspection said of the depth, but the good well is about 400 feet deep, and the bad well is shallower. The good well produces water enough to keep my 10,000 gallon tanks full, but I don't use much water at all. In fact, I prefer to pee outside, for example, assuming it's good for the environment (and nobody can see me doing it!).
For "my" two wells, one can't run more than two or three minutes (or maybe not even that) before shutting down, even in the late winter. The other well, the deeper newer well, can run for ten minutes or longer in the late winter, but right now, it's cycling every three or so minutes also. So, we all know what that means.
However, *most* of the neighbors are not complaining, yet one has a well which (she claims) is a thousand feet or more deep! (I find that hard to believe). Another just told me he had a well drilled which is 500 feet deep. There are vinyards here, so, they *must* be using a lot of irrigation water (although most have a run-off collection system for interring the winter rains underground).
The main ones with the problem are the two single moms, who have at the moment, what I'm told is a "dry" well. It may just be that the two of them are both renting out portions of their households, so, their water load is too much for the one well (I don't know), but, at the moment, the concerns are more prophylactic than dire (at least for me).
With 40-acre zoning out here, nobody is going to build any more houses, so, we have to make do with what we have right now.
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On 6/28/2014 12:32 PM, DannyD. wrote:

Wonder what's with the vineyards? I'd go ask them what's their source of water.
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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 08:05:11 -0400:

This is good information to think about, as the main intent is to plan ahead about our options, if the drought continues in force.
We can rest assured there will be no rain until about November, but, after that, we won't know what will happen.
Another year of no rain would be telling.
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On 6/28/2014 12:33 PM, DannyD. wrote:

Ideally, if there are enough concerned people, folks can drive up the hill with the five gal water jugs from the department store. A few of those in the kitchen for cooking, drinking, etc might reduce the strain a bit. Also good exercise.
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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 07:26:30 -0400:

I don't think code allows inground tanks.
They're all above ground.
I've never seen a single tank, and most have clusters of two or three.
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On 6/27/2014 4:16 PM, DannyD. wrote:

Most of the people around here have their water trucked in from the water plant in town about 20 miles away. I believe they get about 2000 gallons for $70 or $80.
I have a 200 gallon tank on my 1/2 ton. I go into town once a week, mail, groceries etc and pick up 170 gallons costing $2 and change. (prepaid card) That water is used for all our household needs. We practice water conservation to help stretch the supply. Don't flush after every leak, turn the shower off while soaping down. Not an overly inconvenient lifestyle and as I see it the truck pays for itself. Depending on the amount of company we get on the weekends I generally need to bring in a load three weeks out of four. We live on a riverbank so irrigating the lawn and garden is not a problem but I don't use any river water in the house.
LdB
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HomeGuy wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 08:53:43 -0400:

Oh oh!
While I have almost a full tank of water, my well situation is (apparently) much worse (for me) than I had thought it was!
https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3919/14504597706_a2b48ba502_b.jpg
I went outside just now to snap that picture of my tanks for you (I think I miscalculated my tank size) and I realized, to my horror, that my one "good" well was not pumping anything when I cycled the circuit breakers out of curiosity!
So, I just shut down all the circuit breakers, and will give the pumps a half hour or more to "rest", and then I will turn each pump on, to time how long they last.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2936/14524280261_702ee2fd1d_b.jpg

I am not the expert, but, I think the well runs dry every day all day. I only go out there when there is a problem, but, for example, my main well wasn't pumping anything when I just cycled it, and my old well ran for just a few seconds (barely enough to spin the water meter a tenth of a revolution).

I'm not climbing up right now, but, I *have* looked into my tanks, and, yes, it's rusty and spidery in there. But we drink the water all the time, and, AFAIK, there is no filter.

Yes. - House - Sprinklers
https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2912/14341451517_3567e6e21b_k.jpg
- Pool
https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3814/14125545570_e6f48b9f56_b.jpg
While I have one of the smallest houses here, my pool is almost 40K gallons, and their are almost 200 sprinkler heads, so, that's an appreciable amount of water. When the sprinklers turned on earlier this week, they drained the tanks, so, that's another homeowner task I have to figure out why that happened.
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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 07:39:45 -0400:

I'm no expert, but I can see the wharf hydrants at *every* home. Here's mine, for example:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2914/14526573314_81a4c06b1f_b.jpg
Plus, since we're in the most extreme fire hazard zone there is in California, there's always a helicopter flying around which can't but help notice the pool:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3678/14286469592_4e18e5582b_c.jpg
However, pool or no pool, it's my understanding every home is required to reserve a huge portion of the bottom of their water tanks, I believe, for that wharf hydrant.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2901/14526630374_2281e4c58a_b.jpg
For example, here's the bottom of "my" tank with the fire reserve marked off at some point years ago where the outflow shuts off:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2928/14341507028_d151d927c9_b.jpg
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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 07:39:45 -0400:

I don't know how much water most people use, but I emptied both my tanks a few times this past month to the point that the water completely shut off to the house (it just dribbled out the faucet).
It's actually a slightly complicated system, where this little block of wood determines my fate.
If I can "see" the block of wood, that's bad. If it goes over a certain line, the water shuts off. When it goes below another certain line, the water shuts off.
My fate is determined by a little yellow block of wood! :)
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On 6/28/2014 2:52 PM, DannyD. wrote:

Looks more like a big grey tank, to me.
Sounds like your aquifier is used up. Which is not good. And at the top of a hill, not likely to come back any time soon.
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trader_4 wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 04:58:29 -0700:

I only called Hertz in San Jose: Hertz Equipment Rental 408-451-9320 (1695 N. 1st St, near SJC airport) Because I just was running a quick survey for the neighbors.
Given the fact the Fire Department idea is a better idea, that seems like a reasonable approach to take if it works.
Also, the fact that water tanks on the move are "baffled" was entirely new to me, as I wouldn't want an unbaffled tank to throw a pickup truck off the cliff (the roads are very windy).
I like the idea of drilling deeper, but, of course, that's an expensive (albeit more permanent) option.
But, what's worse, all of a sudden, is that I found "my" wells weren't working. I've had the circuit breakers all off for about an hour and a half, so, I'll test the flow soon.
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Pico Rico wrote, on Sat, 28 Jun 2014 09:27:42 -0700:

The mountains with the trees!
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