T style table fence: brain picking

On 11/16/2016 3:44 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Here is the Saw Stop fence diagram and install instructions.
http://www.sawstop.com/images/uploads/manuals/ICS_T-Glide_Fence_System_Owners_Manual_%28Oct_08%29.pdf
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Thank you, Leon, that will be quite useful. I assume you have this fence? If so, could I impose on you sometime you are in your shop and ask you to measure the length of the "T" to which the fence attaches? It lools to be 12"-14" and I am sure the length is not critical but the shorter it is the shorter I can make the rail, not a lot of room left in my workshop :(
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On 11/17/2016 12:20 PM, dadiOH wrote:
Snip

Yes

The T is 16" long and the fence is about 46" long.
FWIW the longer "T" affords easier minute adjustments when squaring to the miter slots.
I will add that this is on the "industrial" SawStop. The smaller professional and contractor saws also have smaller fences.
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Many, many thanks! I've been drawing it 18", just as a guestimate

That was my thinking for the 18". I may - or may not - make it a bit shorter.
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On 11/17/2016 2:10 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Keep in mind, if you do not have a right extension table that the right side of the T dictates that the front rail has to be longer than your desired rip width by the width of the fence plus the length of the right side of the T. If you wanted 50" rip capacity the rail needs to be 8~12" longer.
And you have to have a right side table that extends a few inches past your desired rip capacity to hold up the far in of the fence.
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On 11/17/2016 3:10 PM, dadiOH wrote:

I have the small Delta fence that looks exactly like the Bessimier and Saw Stop fence. I put it on my 1954 Rockwell/Delta contractors saw. It works fine and cost around $150 a while ago, and still well under $200 at Lowes.
Any way, the "T", which is a piece of angle iron, is 13 3/4" long on mine, and I have the short fence version, not the long one. I'd think the long one just has longer rails, but not sure. Also, the rear rail serves no recognizable purpose, far as I can tell. I use it to mount a rear extension table.
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The Biesemeyer Home Shop saw fence has a 14 inch steel T.
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I am not a YouTube expert, but the hundred or so total videos I have watche d have all appeared good to me. They had clear pictures, steady pictures, and good sound. About the same as my television screen. Wonder what kind of video recorder you need to do high quality internet videos? I can still remember the televisions from the 1970s that were black and white, size of a refrigerator on its side, and had grain on the screen about 1/4" in size . You would have to be an expert in video manipulation to get a modern You Tube video to look that bad.
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I am not a YouTube expert, but the hundred or so total videos I have watched have all appeared good to me. They had clear pictures, steady pictures, and good sound. About the same as my television screen. Wonder what kind of video recorder you need to do high quality internet videos?
As with most things, it is more about technique than equipment. One can have the absolute best of whatever and use it poorly, conversly, poor equipment can give good results when used knowledgeably.
IME, the poor craftsman is constantly searching for better equipment thinking that will magically elevate the quality of his work. Doesn't.
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No, but what it does do is tell him that it's not the equipment. I've had saws, both jig and circular, that _would_not_ cut a straight line. I thought it was me. A decent saw made all the difference. My track saw is a *hell* of a lot more accurate than my circular saw, even with a fence (which tends to move). There is something the be said for good tools.
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A good craftsman doesn't blame his tools, he stops the project to tune or acquire a tool that will give him the results he desires.
Circular saws seem like such simple things that it's hard to make them bad. They found a way, though! I pronounced one circular saw I had borrowed dead when I saw the way the blade moved so readily side-to-side. Bad bearings or something. I stopped the job and found another saw... a handsaw but at least it was still sharp!
This post is about the juxtoposition of thought... The "good craftsman" saying is actually about a "bad craftsman" and circular saws are simple enough it's easy to make them good.
Puckdropper
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On 20 Nov 2016 02:57:37 GMT, Puckdropper

A crafstman doesn't have crapsman tools. There is no tuning a turd. it will always be a turd.

Crapsman sure managed the impossible, then. It would *not* cut a straight line.

It may be "easy" but much too tough for Sears.
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On 11/19/2016 11:18 PM, krw wrote:

Actually there are some sears tools that are better than others. I have a portalign portable drill press. Dead on straight, while the General and other brands are not.
I have had other tools from Sears that were pretty good too.
_But There also are a ton of their tools that are earn them the Crapsman moniker._
--
Jeff

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On 11/20/2016 9:30 AM, woodchucker wrote:

The good Craftsman power tools are the ones that look exactly like another brand except for color.
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wrote:

I have Sears hand tools that are pretty good but every one of their power tools has been pure junk. Not all were cheap, either.

I have wrench sets that are great.

They're called "power tools". ;-)
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On 11/19/16 8:57 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

I was replacing an oak handrail volute for a client who was way too hands on and thought he knew how to do everything and made sure he told me such.
I was making a preliminary cut just to remove the old, bad section. I measured thrice, drew a line, and went out to the van to get a saw. I came in with my cheap but effective and super-sharp Japanese style pull saw. The guy looked at me like I was an amateur and started saying things like, "Hey, I have a really good Milwaukee Sawzall if you want to use it." "How is that going to..." and at about that moment, I started cutting.
My cut was so straight, clean, and perfectly on the line that it ended up being my final cut. The dude's demeanor totally changed and he was all, "Wow, man, I've never seen anybody use one of those. That thing cut like butter." I said, "Yeah, I can just control this saw better than an electric one. Plus, I'm done with the cut by the time I plug in an extension cord."
Then I explained how a powered saw could jump around and would be too course of a cut. Then I showed him how I avoided cutting into the other sections of handrail that were very close to where I was cutting, etc., etc.
I don't know what that has to do with your story, but it reminded me of it. :-)
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