New Yankee Workshop

<https://www.thisoldhouse.com/new-yankee-workshop?season=1
"This Old House is partnering with New Yankee Workshop to make all 21 seasons of Norm Abram's classic fine-woodworking program available again! Soon you'll be able to stream every episode of NYW, with the option to purchase the plans for each project Norm makes on the show."
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On 6/18/2018 5:54 PM, Spalted Walt wrote:

cool!
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On Monday, June 18, 2018 at 5:54:12 PM UTC-5, Spalted Walt wrote:

In all those 21 seasons, did Norm pull out a hand plane even once?
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On Monday, June 18, 2018 at 6:54:42 PM UTC-5, Michael wrote:

Did you have a point, or are you trolling?
Robert
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On 6/18/2018 7:54 PM, Michael wrote:

Yes
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On 6/18/2018 6:54 PM, Michael wrote:

S1E2! In the same episode he used his RAS (do you 'spose it was one that was recalled?) with a wobble dado and his drill press which was actually a Shopsmith. Because of him I got a dado like his and used the heck out of it til I gave it to my son. He uses it today. I'm not saying you are Mike, but a lot of people poo-poo Norm's techniques. If you watch an episode from each season 1st to last you'll see his skills improve. He was like the rest of us that got our skills from Hard Knocks. He may have been just a notch better than the rest of us wood butchers when he started the show, but like most of us he got better (and so did his tools) with every project. I was always appreciative of his show. I wouldn't miss it. When my oldest son was a submariner, I'd send pirated VCR tapes to him so they could watch his show too. When I missed sending a couple tapes on time I got a phone call from the Captain explaining he was trying to prevent a mutiny "so send those tapes" as everyone on the boat looked forward to them. Steve
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On Monday, June 18, 2018 at 7:26:15 PM UTC-5, shiggins1 wrote:

Steve,
I love Norm Abrams. I was inspired by his show to believe I could make things also and I learned incredible amounts from him. But he sure liked that belt sander.
Sincerely,
Brad Naylor
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On Mon, 18 Jun 2018 17:45:32 -0700 (PDT), Michael

Like you, I learned A LOT by watching Norm. I'm a woodworker today because I was inspired by him, so that I became interested in watching similar programs plus YouTube videos. As a result, today I have a hobby that allows me to make things that are both useful and attractive. It's very rewarding.
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https://www.youtube.com/embed/JzC3equapDs?autoplay=1&start
$&endH
HTH
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On Monday, June 18, 2018 at 8:02:07 PM UTC-5, Spalted Walt wrote:

Questions about Season 1, Episode 1, the oak medicine cabinet: 1) Does he really need to nail on the face frame? Won't the glue hold it in place? 2) Does he need the dowels to hold his thru-tenon on the door? Won't the glue alone hold that joint place also?
I would be inclined just to use glue, but maybe I'm wrong about that.
Mike
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Norm has said it any number of times - he used the brads to hold things together (sans clamps) long enough for the glue to set. That is, bradss are a temporary solution to the final solution, the glue.

No and yes - a pegged M&T is aesthetically pleasing insurance... https://www.holtonframes.com/frames-framing/frame-catalog/corner-treatments/ https://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/joinery/mortises-tenons https://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/01/28/reinforce-mortise-and-tenon-joinery-with-square-pegs

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On Tuesday, June 19, 2018 at 9:13:55 AM UTC-5, Spalted Walt wrote:

You've got me turned around on the dowels for the door. I prefer the look without the dowels, but I can see where others would prefer the dowel look and the additional strength.
About using brads/nails as temporary clamps, I would not like the look of the fill hole at the top of the face frame.
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On 6/18/2018 9:42 PM, Michael wrote: ...

If had a nickel for every time he said "to hold in place while the glue dries"! :)
I always figured a lot of his tool and production choices were driven by the fact that he had tool sponsors who wanted (as in expected/demanded) their tools be front and foremost to continue the financial backing...
--




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On Tuesday, June 19, 2018 at 12:45:03 PM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

I never understood the hysterical screeching that surfaced here and other w oodworking venues when he used the brad gun. It's just a small trim nail.. . to me it was a good idea. I never watched Norm until the last few years he was on, so I don't know if he represented it as some "super tool" or "ul timate woodworking solution" to draw the ire of the home woodworker. It wa s awful on Sawmill Creek.
I didn't understand it because by the time I found the opportunity to watch it on a Saturday afternoon he just pulled out the brad gun and pegged some thing as needed. Although we didn't have pneumatic tools back then on the j ob (only framing guns) we had been using "a" screw or "a" nail to hold thin gs in place while glues set for many years.

No doubt.
The only thing I ever had a real problem with that Norm did was trying to w atch his finishing. As a professional finisher/refinisher, it was really p ainful sometimes to see the wrong materials used, materials applied incorre ctly, and incorrect prep procedures.
I thought a lot of his projects were pretty interesting, but as I said I di dn't seem them until the run of the show was about 75% or more complete.
Robert
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On Tuesday, June 19, 2018 at 5:57:42 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

watch his finishing. As a professional finisher/refinisher, it was really painful sometimes to see the wrong materials used, materials applied incor rectly, and incorrect prep procedures.

Pretty sure Norm started out life as a carpenter, home builder. Not as a f ine furniture woodworker. So for him a paint brush or roller and paint or varnish was finishing. Maybe he also had experience with rubbing boiled li nseed oil on something too.
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On 6/19/2018 5:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

...
As another says, he started as carpenter and the projects weren't intended as anything but what they were as beginning to intermediate handyman projects for the amateur.
Many (and, I'd wager of those who did, a very low percentage were truly of markedly higher skill sets) wanted to judge as if he were building high-quality reproductions or the like.
--


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On Tuesday, June 19, 2018 at 7:18:26 PM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

I have to agree with both of you. I just watched a couple of his videos. S eason 1, episodes 1&2. You hit it on the head. It is a thirty year old vid eo and the techniques and designs reflect that. The shop was cleaned out an d not at all crowded. I got a real kick out of him using a radial arm saw, a drill press that I swear was a Shop Smith, and a Makita router with the b adge taken off.
He made a shaker style medicine cabinet and it was a walk down memory lane. He NAILED the rails and stiles on the face of the cabinet (the way I was taught!)and had no brad nailer. He nailed till flush and then counter sunk the nail with a set.
He screwed the back of the cabinet on with 1" sheetrock screws. Instead of using nice (or decorative) hinges, he used a full door length brass piano h inge. He even pinned the corner of the door joinery with a couple of dowel s, and ground them off with a belt sander. When finished, he rounded over the door edges with a hand held router, no table.
I have to say this, it sure made woodworking look "doable", and accessible. The finishing... well, he could have spent a day or so in the library to help that out.

Yeah, I see that all the time. I started out as a trade carpenter that did everything from setting concrete forms to site building cabinets. When I g o to an amateur's home, I find that the guys that have the MOST skills are the most humble and are almost shy about their efforts. I have seen a lot of good work from home shops over the years. But I have to bite my tongue around the braggarts that go on and on and on because they are so proud abo ut their minimal skills and very few rudimentary projects.
Worse are the guys that think because the have spent a fortune on tools, it has somehow brought their skill level up to match the amount of money they have in those tools. With $20K in tools and a dedicated shop, they think t hey are experts. Coincidentally, almost without exception the guys that ha ve the most money in tools and the most expensive tools seem to do very few projects. They sure like to talk about woodwork, cabinet building, and th e things they are "thinking" about doing.
I remember when Norm came to Woodcraft as a promotion a couple of different times. The guys that hung around him for a bit and then took him to dinne r said he was a really nice guy, soft spoken and polite. They did tell me on both trips the last thing he wanted to talk about was anything to do wit h woodworking.
Robert
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On 6/19/2018 5:57 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Agreed

It was the stains that were almost opaque over cherry or walnut that made me cringe. He may as well have used poplar to begin with.

I was always interested in all of his projects up to finishing, he did a great job on the vast majority.
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On 6/19/2018 12:44 PM, dpb wrote:

Yeah but if you are actually selling your work and or trying to make a living you would be using a nail gun too. I do. ;~)
While not using a nail gun or similar short cut tool is nothing any of us want to do, it saves time and time is.......money..
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