Mortising and tenoning doors and windows

snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Well, tried it out. Nothing fancy, just a stop to clamp to the fence on the radial saw--a piece of stud with another piece of stud stuck on the end at a 90 degree angle. Could have just made a butt-joint and it would have been fine, but stuck a couple of dominos in it.
Having done that little bit, I'm sold. If you need mortises within its capability, this _is_ the way to do it. It's accurate, quick, tidy, and just no fuss.
Anybody worried about control, don't be. It doesn't fight you at all. It just sits there spinning away until you push the handle, then when you push it makes the mortise, and that's all that happens.
One of the pieces was a cut off length of 2x3 stud about 4 inches long. As an experiement I stuck it on the radial saw table, on edge, and trapped it between the fence and the Domino. The Domino held it quite securely and the mortise went in with no fuss at all (that's with the 8mm bit). I never felt the slightest lack of control. With two tenons dry fitted my little stop was stuck together well enought that I could have used it even without glue, but I went ahead and glued it and tomorrow I should be able to use it to cut sash to length.
So, it was a pile of money but I think it was very much worthwhile.
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Thanks for the review. Another half a degree tilt until the Domino falls and I find a reason to buy one. :-)
Puckdropper
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On 9/28/2016 3:24 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

It is a tool that makes you wonder how you got anything done with out it. The sooner you get it the sooner you will be happy that you got it. LOL
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Stupid simple huh? LOL
Now think back to the motriser you were considering. :-) If you have ever used a traditional motriser I'm betting the Domino really looks good now.
Keep us posted on your door and Windows. Pictures would be cool !

Think of how worthwhile after hundreds or thousands of mortises. :-)
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In article <857830532.496758133.507414.lcb11211-

Well, glued up the first storm window frame today. Lessons learned-- domino tenon can hold a _lot_ of glue. If I'm going to be producing these in any kind of quantity I need to make up a jig to keep them square. Domino does a remarkable job of keeping surfaces even--edges I need to practice on a bit. Not sure if I'm going to stick with cypress--it's softer than I remembered from making lawn furniture some years back and just from ordinary handling it gets dinged up. I hope I can get it painted this week and glaze it and put it up over the weekend and once that's done the worst-damaged window will at least have something covering it.
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On 10/9/2016 6:50 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

A key to building square frames, as I am sure you well know, is for the like/same pieces to be precisely the same length. That is the easy part, just batch cut the parts and cut the ends square.
Clamping up is another story. I have come up with a method the insures accuracy with out jigs or squares.
I'll try to explain as simply as I can.
The trick is for the rails to line up precisely with the ends of the stiles. While this does not seem like rocket science all too often after removing the clamps a rail is short or proud of the end of the stile, and that throws square out the window.
If you use 2 small clamps to clamp a strait edge scrap, longer than the rail, to the edge of the rail it establishes an indexing stop on both ends of the rail. The straight edge protrusion on each end will index to the bottom of the stiles.
Next use bar clamps to squeeze the straight edge protrusions "snug" against the ends of the stiles.
Next use clamps and tighten the stiles against the ends of the rails.
You can now remove all clamps except the two that clamp the stiles against the ends of the rails.
This picture shows the alignment clamps mentioned in the first two steps. Not shone are the final 2 clamps that will clamp the stiles against the rail ends on the top and bottom of the frame.
After those top and bottom clamps are applied tightly, all clamps in the picture can be removed while the glue dries, or not.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/12140851433/in/dateposted-public/
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On 9/26/2016 7:49 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

;~) It is a great vac. and "quiet".
The sanders are damn good too and when hooked up to the vac little escapes. I often do not do any prep, wiping down or blowing, between sanding and varnishing.
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@swbelldotnet says...

Who but Festool would think to make a variable-speed vacuum cleaner?

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On Wednesday, September 28, 2016 at 6:07:29 PM UTC-4, J. Clarke wrote:

The Eureka (now Sanitaire) Mighty Mite has a rotating collar on the hose that opens a vent to adjust the suction. Does that count?
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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

Not really. Most vacuums have some way to make a hole in the hose. Turn down the Festool and it doesn't just suck less hard, the noise level goes down as well. And it has a much wider range of adjustment than the "hole in the hose" kind.
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On 9/28/2016 7:30 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

I understand the Festool sells that feature as a safety when working on a circuit that might trip should you be running an amp hungry power tool and the vac. Turning down the suction/motor speed decreases the draw on the circuit. This might very well be a good deal when working on older homes.
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On 9/28/2016 7:16 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Variable suction, not speed. LOL
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On Wed, 28 Sep 2016 18:07:24 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Sears? ;-)
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On 9/28/2016 5:07 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

I think there are others, no?
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wrote:

Sure, as I said above, I have a Crapsman 5-1/2HP (with a 16Ga cord) shop vac that has variable speed. I don't think I've used it more than once at anything but the highest setting (actually the power switch can be set to either be variable of full).
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On 9/29/2016 12:24 PM, krw wrote: snip

The variable speed on the Festool vac is very helpful when using it with sanders. If the suction is too high the sander moves sluggishly across the work. The best setting is with the power turned do to just enough to capture the dust and lets the sander move freely.
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Interesting phenomena.
Perhaps the sander moves sluggishly due to it being pulled into the work from too much suction. Excess suction could be relieved by redesigning/opening the vents in the sander. OTOH, prolly cheaper to add variable speeds on shop vac. ;)
nb
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On 9/29/2016 1:13 PM, notbob wrote:

Wow nothing gets past you~ ;~)
Excess suction could be relieved by

The ports are on the sander pad and the sand paper, Air blows through the center/central port and is retrieved through the perimeter ports. To capture dust this is where the ports need to be.
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On 9/29/2016 2:17 PM, Leon wrote:

I was going to reply to fauxrobert, but bit my tongue ... it's still bleeding. lol
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Yeah. Gotta be clever cuz I can't afford Festools. ;)
nb
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