Mortising and tenoning doors and windows

wrote:

This is why I'm a little confused over the objection to the mortise length of the Domino. They don't have to be through.

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On 9/16/2016 10:30 PM, krw wrote:

I think Swingman has mentioned a time or two getting the bigger Domino. I think for a furniture and cabinet builder that the 500 is perfect. While the big one would be nice to have, I seriously doubt that a furniture/cabinet maker would ever need more than the 500. The Domino makes quality builds a dream come true with its accuracy and lightning speed compared to conventional machinery like a mortiser. I am convened that a woodworker that is serious about building quality furniture that the Domino is an answer to many how do I do it questions.
In Clark's case he has a particular need and the 700 could possibly be "the answer" if "he" can make it work. IMHO if he could make it work the 700 would be used much more in future projects than a mortiser.
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wrote:

That was exactly my point. Unless you're a door-maker or butcher-block maker (are there any of those?) I don't see the need for the 700. Maybe if you want to build a house without nails... ;-) The 500 is probably the slickest tool around, though.
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says...

Near as I can tell, there is one thing that the 500 will do that the 700 will not--the 500 has an extra width setting (its settings are an exact fit, 6mm wider, and 10mm wider, the XL only does the exact and 6, not the 10). I thought this would matter but there aren't wider tenons to take advantage of it near as I can tell and cutting wider seems pretty easy anyway. That makes the 700 a very easy decision and at this point I'm leaning in that direction. In fact I'm leaning pretty hard in that direction. I'd be making storm windows with it right now if I hadn't found out when I got to Woodcraft that I had FORGOTTEN MY DARNED WALLET!!! Turns out that that Festool even has instructions in the user manual for using it with coped sash.
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On Sat, 17 Sep 2016 19:30:53 -0400, "J. Clarke"

The idea isn't wider tenons, rather slop in placing the mortise.

BTDT. I was on a business trip to Columbus last week and forgot the "Woodcraft cash" at home.

Cool. Sounds like you're all set. Remember, it only hurts once.
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On 9/17/2016 6:30 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

The wider cut than exact fit is NOT for wider tenons, it is to allow wiggle room and in so much that I never use the widest setting, the "just" wider than exact fit works well. I'm not sure if you saw my comment about using exact fit on one side of the joint and the wider cut for the opposite side but that certainly makes life easier. I doubt you will ever see any loss of strength by using the wider mortise cut for all of your joint unions.
That makes the 700 a very easy decision and at this point

Turns out that that Festool even has instructions in the user

Bonus!

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On 9/17/2016 7:12 PM, Leon wrote:

And one last thing, when at all possible, which is most of the time, do not use the bottom of the Domino as the reference to a work surface, use the fence on the material. If you use the bottom and the material is warped/bowed or has any debris under it, it will not set flat on the work surface and your mortises will be cut too low.
This goes for biscuit cutters too.
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On 9/17/2016 7:12 PM, Leon wrote:

Since I use a Multi-Router for floating tenon joiner and I make all my tenons myself, begs a question:
If the need arose is there any reason you can't cut a wider mortise with the domino (say one and a half or two passes) and make your own tenons?
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Wouldn't it be easier and stronger to just use multiple tenons?
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says...

Depends on the geometry of the particular piece I suspect.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com says...

The internet abounds with method of making your own dominos. Google "DIY domino tenons".
If you're picky about fit and doing it in volume the roundover on the edges can be an issue--in principle it's easy with a router and a roundover bit, in practice try to find a 7mm radius roundover bit in the US.
This table was posted on the Festool forum by Gregg Mann: <http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-how-to/are-there-specific-router- bits-recommended-for-making-my-own-dominoes/>
5mm-use 3/32 rad. (If you can find them in each case) 6mm 1/8 8mm 5/32 10mm 3/16 12mm 1/4
Others just chamfer the ends, use a block plane, sand them, or even use them square.
I susspect that somebody would do well producing a purpose made set of bits to cut dominos.
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I considered making my own 8 years ago when, like you, I was doing tons or research. But after considering how many domino tenons I was using I decided that they were not cost prohibitive. My time is more valuable than the cost of the tenons. While the larger tenons are more expensive you will likely, in the long run, use more of the less expensive tenons. Now I realize that you mat not use any 5mm tenons but those are on par with large biscuits when bought in case quantities. Plus all Domino tenons have small impressions on both sides to retain glue while you tap them in.
It is relatively easy to make a tenons but not so much, precisely sized. A little to thin and alignment problems on mating pieces show up. The question to ask is, do you want to spend time building or maker tenons?
I wonder how long and at what cost 6,000 5mm tenons and materials and router bits would cost me? Buying pre made has cost me between $225-$250 over 8 years.
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In article <1881806531.495898453.348798.lcb11211-

Well, I was all set to drop the hammer on the XL 700 and Woodcraft doesn't have any. Always something.
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On Sun, 25 Sep 2016 16:21:56 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Free shipping?
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snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.com says...

True, and no tax. Was hoping to support the brick and mortar store. I'll call Coastal on Monday and if they don't have it Amazon it is (Coastal is local to me).
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On Sun, 25 Sep 2016 18:23:08 -0400, "J. Clarke"

That's why I usually buy from Highland. It's "local" (but free shipping for Festool, I think) and they stock everything green (and a whole lot more)[*]. They make Woodcraft look sick, though I did go to a really nice Woodcraft in Columbus, OH.
[*] They've had a lot of trouble keeping Lie Nielson in inventory, though. Been getting sold out within a week after they receive it.
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snipped-for-privacy@somewhere.com says...

Well, got no more excuses. Dropped the hammer on the XL tonight and the 8-10mm tenon package. Also an impulse buy--confronted with $160 for the magic vacuum hose that actually fits the thing and connects it to a regular shop vac, or $495 for a Festool vac, I went for the vac. Yeah, the green guys saw _me_ coming.
So hope to have the first of the storm windows together this weekend. Once all the storms are done then I can start on the primary windows. Looks like I won't need screens for a while.
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On Mon, 26 Sep 2016 20:49:49 -0400, "J. Clarke"

;-)
I don't think you'll be disappointed. I should have bought the vac with a tool, too, but at least it was on sale.

Let us know how you progress.
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On 9/26/2016 7:49 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

Congratulations!
A Festool dust extractor has made me just as much in cleanup, and thus saved time, as the tools that will attach to it.
Not unusual, when I leave it on a remodel where the house remains occupied, for a client to ask if they can use it overnight. It was a tossup at first, but now glad I bought all its vacuum cleaner type attachments.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com says...

I'm finding already that a man with Festools has many friends <grin>.
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