Mortising and tenoning doors and windows

The time has come to start fixing windows and doors. Some are coming apart, some are rotting, some are just busted (it's amazing how much damage an ice dam falling 20 feet onto a window air conditioner can do).
The house has 15 double-hung windows, three exterior doors, and 6 interior doors. The garage adds two windows and three doors (excluding the main garage door).
So this works out if I've calculated correctly, to 17 windows and 12 doors. Each window and six of the doors will need a storm window or storm door and a screen.
Doing all this right and old-school, I figure that it's going to add up to something like 484 mortise and tenon joints.
So, the question is what's the best way to approach those joints. Note that I'm 63 and retirement isn't going to happen any time soon so this all has to fit around work and I'm not as spry as I used to be--doing it all with a Japanese saw and a good set of chisels, while it would be good for the soul, isn't going to fit the schedule (I'd like to have it all done before I'm dead).
Now, existing equipment--router table with 3 HP router and Incra jig. 10" Radial Arm Saw. 10" table saw. 14" extended band saw. Radial drill press. Oscillating belt sander. 1.5 hp compressor. Gross overkill dust collector. Portable tools--circular saw, jigsaw, Sawzall, belt, pad, and random orbit sanders, 1/2" drill, electric impact driver. Assorted chisels, saws, planes, and other hand tools. Bench with pattern vise.
Budget. Andersons from Home Depot are going to cost me around $17,000 plus installation. I figure that using cypress and double-glazed glass assemblies purchased online for the windows and cypress and Lexan for the storms, I'm at about 12K with a reasonable allowance for waste and incidentals. That means that I can put 5K into tooling and still be ahead and with IMO better quality and far far greater satisfaction.
I see the options as:     Big Domino     Little Domino     Leigh FMT Pro     Leigh FMT Super     Horizontal Router Table (MLCS or similar)     Horizontal Boring Machine (Grizzly G0540 or similar)     Shop made mortising and tenoning jigs specific to the required     cuts     Something else I haven't thought of
Or possibly more than one of the above.
So, thoughts?          
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

Sorry to reply to myself, but tools, in addition, jointer and planer-- the jointer is probably going to have to be upgraded.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/11/2016 6:56 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

You do not mention anything about the window tracks and other assessors that will be needed to install the all of those items.
If your house is paid for or nearly so, why don't your get a home loan for the windows and go fishing, camping, sailing, or what ever your hobby is.
I would assume that to cut, mill, and glue together nearly a month of 8 hours days to make them. Plus some time to install them. You are not only making a huge investment in materials but also a large investment of your time.
While wood working may be your hobby, with that large of commitment it will become work. And since you will be your own boss, your boss will not take kindly if you slip off for some other activity before they are done.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

Repairs to the tracks as needed are included. If I don't stick with the original tracks, jambliners don't even make a dent in the incidentals allowance.

The "rec" in "rec.woodworking", if you did not already know, stands for "recreation". Need I say more?

No shit? Sherlock.
I'm from the "We choose to do this, and the other things, not because they are easy but because they are hard . . ." generation.
Spread over weekends, that's 15 weekends or a year and a third--say three years. That gives me something to do weekends other than stagnate, which is a net benefit.

Which is between me and myself.
--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mr Clarke, my husband and I need to replace the windows in our home. My husband is an avid and accomplished DIY guy and thinks he is capable of building the windows himself. Seeing as how it's been a year since you started your projcet, could you please post an update on your progress, along with any problems you experienced along the way, please? If you would post some pictures of the windows completed thus far that would be great as well! Thank you in advance for your help!
On Mon, 12 Sep 2016 06:43:15 -0400,

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/9/2017 10:27 AM, Michelle Becker wrote:

LOL Good luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, September 9, 2017 at 1:02:20 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Yeah, good luck with that! If I were to try to replace all my sashes (or did you mean your whole window units?), I'd draw up the specs, then have a milling company mill all the woodwork, then do the assembly myself. Doing the millwork, yourself, would be the real challenge, more likely requiring more expertise (and dedicated tools) than a typical DIYer has. It may not be the idea of doing things because they are hard, but to do things accura tely and properly, for best results.
If nothing else, at least you might consider getting prices for milling the (sash) woodwork required.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/10/2017 10:19 AM, Sonny wrote:

Even at that, a local shop probably has more cost in milling a dozen windows that Marvin or Anderson doing a couple of thousand. Unless it is a historical building, pre-made has to be more sensible. May not make much difference in mild climates, but the design is critical for efficiency in cold climates. I imagine you can buy some of the locking and tilting hardware, I never looked.
I had nine Marvin Windows installed. It is more than my skill set could handle to build them that well including the inserts in the glass.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/11/2016 9:26 PM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

It is wise to stay out of debt once you get out.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 12 Sep 2016 09:00:49 -0500, Leon wrote:

And that's the catch. I just finished 15 maple bookcases. One or two is a hobby. Fifteen is just plain work! But they do look nice :-).
--
When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and
carrying a cross.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Would that I could convince my girlfriend of that :-(
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote
That means that I can put 5K into tooling and still be ahead and with IMO better quality and far far greater satisfaction.
I see the options as:     Big Domino     Little Domino     Leigh FMT Pro     Leigh FMT Super     Horizontal Router Table (MLCS or similar)     Horizontal Boring Machine (Grizzly G0540 or similar)     Shop made mortising and tenoning jigs specific to the required     cuts     Something else I haven't thought of
Or possibly more than one of the above.
So, thoughts?     
I hope that you've done something like this before, and it sounds like you have! I wish you luck with your (big) project! Maybe you could invite Leon for a visit--he seems to LIKE big projects! ; )
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This thread has been a real education, for me. I barely knew what a mortise/tenon joint was, let alone a loose tenon. So, my question is about the Rockler Beadlock system. Is this not a good system? Is that why it is not listed. Or......?
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've never used it but suspect it is fine. Just a LOT of holes to drill and non-standard tenons.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And making it work well with coping I suspect would be a pain.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, September 13, 2016 at 8:14:40 PM UTC-4, J. Clarke wrote:

just received this link today...any interest/comments?: https://www.leighjigs.com/fmt_videos.php
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 14 Sep 2016 07:08:49 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Pretty expensive! I thought about buying one but you're with spitting range of the Domino, with the FMT.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/14/2016 2:09 PM, krw wrote:

My thoughts and not restricted to size like with the FMT.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Specially considering how much of the tool's contruction is plastic. Festool is equally guilty.

I can see the size advantage to the Festool, but isn't the Domino strictly for slip/floating tenons?
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/14/2016 3:22 PM, notbob wrote:

Yes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.