Jointing On A Router Table - Can't Keep Even Pressure

wrote:

But why does the bearing need a surface harder than a board. It's not very sharp. ;-)
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On 1/14/18 4:07 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

I think it's to protect it from betting bumped or nicked up. I used hard maple on my dado jig because the surfaces are always protected by the opposing sides.
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wrote:

Aluminum doesn't dent? I'd go for the maple (or perhaps white oak) for a long-term use jig, too.
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On 1/14/18 5:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

I never said nor implied that it doesn't dent. I'm guessing it's harder and more stable than oak.
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On 1/13/2018 3:10 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The fence offset MUST ABSOLUTELY BE SET EXACTLY to the the depth of the cut. Apply pressure to the in feed side until you have enough on the out feed side that you can finish the pass.
I can tell you how to do this on your TS, if you have a TS, and a scrap piece of plywood that is 3+' long.
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On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 7:32:36 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Yes, the out-feed fence is flush with the cutting surface of the bit.

Yes, but my problem is on the out-feed side. While working on the out-feed side, any, *any* let-up in pressure against the fence causes the bump.

Thanks, but I am aware of that method.
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Yeah, even using a jointer is a learned talent. Using a router table increases the difficulty because it does not compare to a jointer. Theoretically you should be able to saw a board as accurately with a hand saw as with a TS. See where I'm going here? :-). The less appropriate the tool, the less you should expect.

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Since you want to think that your holding method is at fault rather than your fence haves not being parallel, let me suggest that you not move your hands. There is no need to, left hand holds the work against the outfeed fence, right hand moves it along. Now, if the work were much more than 36" long, you would have to move your right hand but not your left; no matter, left is still holding it where it should be.
Trust me, all is true, been doing it that way for more than 30 years.
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HALVES
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On Sunday, January 14, 2018 at 1:56:44 PM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

Hearing and vision were enough to prove to me that the issue was my holding method.
The fact that I just perfectly jointed a board that fit within the fence width, requiring no need for me to move my hands along the stock, convinces me all the more.

I just changed my feed method and hand positions. I did not change my fences. I was able to joint a 36" board without any bumps.
I was previously holding the board down and against fence with both hands on the out-feed side. Even tried paddles. This time, partially based on your wording, I installed a feather board to hold the board down and placed my left hand on the table, keeping pressure on outside edge of the board to hold it against the out-feed table while moving it with my right. Perfectly jointed edge.

Bottom line is that it wasn't that I *wanted* to think my holding method was at fault, it was 100% true that my holding method was at fault. There was/is no issue with my fences.
Thanks for your suggestion regarding a different holding method.
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YAY!. As a refinement, you don't need the featherboard, your left hand can easily hold it both in and down.
There remains the reason behind your bumps. Even holding it as you described, there should have been none. For a bump to arise, the board has to have slightly moved away from the bit, then moved laterally, then returned to the bit. The simplest explanation is that there was a fulcrum; ie, the fence halves were not parallel.The other explanation is that you were physically moving the work to create the bump. In either case, I'd think the problem would be immediately obvious. Why wasn't it?
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On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 8:28:15 AM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

Belt and suspenders. Easily attached, provides peace of mind.

Exactly - as previously stated very early in this thread.

I'm not sure why you keep going back to the fences. In the post you just responded to I stated that I did not have to adjust the fences to eliminate the bumps. It was all caused by improper hand positioning.

See your "For a bump to arise" sentence above. Also, that fact was previously stated very early in this thread.

It was. Why do you think I started this thread?
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Because if the fences were parallel and you kept the work against the fence when changing hands you should not have made a bump. If they were NOT parallel there would be a fulcrum; if you applied greater/lesser pressure toward the fence on the work piece on one side or the other of the fulcrum, you'd get a bump; if you applied pressure correctly, no bump even if the fences were less than parallel.
IOW, holding as you did should not cause a bump.

I should have said, "In either case, I'd think the SOLUTION would be immediately obvious."
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On 1/15/2018 10:16 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Assuming the fences are positioned correctly, and the pressure is corrrect whether held to the fence manually or with feather boards, there may be a speed factor. If you move the piece through the bit too fast, as the densities of the wood change ie knots, the bumps may be created as the piece moves away from the fence as the bit cuts around the denser wood.
I know I have problems with bumps because of unknown knots in the wood.
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On Monday, January 15, 2018 at 10:16:23 AM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

Do you know how I was holding it when the bumps were created vs. how I modified the holding process?
It should be painfully obvious by now that fences are/were fine based on the fact that I have repeatedly said (and if I ever wanted to post in all caps, this would be the time) I am now able to get a perfectly jointed edge without ever having changed the positioning of the fences.
If the fences were part of the problem I seriously doubt that I would have been able to eliminate the bumps simply my changing the feed method/hand positions.
Please stop bringing the fences into this situation. I'm not saying that a fence mis-alignment wouldn't cause this problem, I'm saying that the fences (imagine all caps again) were not a factor in this specific case.

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