Jointing On A Router Table - Can't Keep Even Pressure

I'm trying to joint some 1 x 8 poplar on my router table so I can glue up a panel. Each piece is 36" long. I have the out-feed fence 1/16" proud of the in-feed fence.
I understand that you are supposed to keep pressure on the out-feed fence but I can't seem to keep even pressure as I move the board along. At 36" long I have to move my hands and when I do, I get a bump in the jointed edge. I tried to clamp 2 feather boards to the table on the out-feed side, but I'm still getting 2-3 bumps on the jointed edge because of hand movement.
Neither fence nor the table is long enough to use push paddles for the entire 36". Is that part of the problem?
Is there any way to get rid of the bumps so I can do a gap free glue-up?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 3:10:56 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

jointed edge.
Bumps, not indents. Can you sand the bumps off? I'm aware you prefer to get the best results using the router, but sanding may be your last resort. Unless someone has a resolution to your issue.
I'm suspecting your fences are not in line, on the same plane, parallel.... hence the "wobble" in the motion of the run through the cutter, i.e., it's not the movement of your hands or hands' position. Mis-aligned fences w ould make the ends of your finished (erred) cut be out of line with the res t of the length of the board/edge, despite any bumps, i.e., even if you san d them down. Does that make sense?
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 4:14:12 PM UTC-6, Sonny wrote:

There's a technique for making a curved edge (an arch), using the jointer: Lower the outfeed table, hence, you get an arced/arched edge. This seems to be similar to what you are experiencing, but you are blaming it on your hand-movement positions.
Check that your fences are coplanar.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 5:14:12 PM UTC-5, Sonny wrote:


o get the best results using the router, but sanding may be your last resor t. Unless someone has a resolution to your issue.

.. hence the "wobble" in the motion of the run through the cutter, i.e., it 's not the movement of your hands or hands' position. Mis-aligned fences would make the ends of your finished (erred) cut be out of line with the r est of the length of the board/edge, despite any bumps, i.e., even if you s and them down. Does that make sense?

Either I'm not understanding what you are saying or you misunderstand me. Not arguing, just trying to clarify.
Here's my side of it...let me know if I'm missing what you are saying.
When jointing on a router table, the fences are *supposed* to be mis-aligne d. The out-feed fence is supposed to be about 1/16" closer to the operator tha n the in-feed fence. The bit is then aligned flush with the face of the out-f eed fence. With pressure kept on the out-feed table, you are supposed to get an edge that is flat and perfect square with the face of the board, just like on a jointer.
My problem is that I am not able to keep consistent pressure on the out-feed fence as I reposition my hands. I get the bump shown below because board is moving away from the bit just a little, therefore less than 1/16" of wood is being removed until my hands are back in place applying pressure against the fence.
https://i.imgur.com/hjSOHrP.jpg
While sanding or planing is a possible solution, there is always the danger of taking off just a little to much and causing a gap. From what I've read or watched, this method is supposed to work, so ether it's my technique or my equipment.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/13/2018 6:31 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

As I said above this is precisely the problem that I was having when routing the profiles on picture frames. While manually holding the piece, the piece would tend to wiggle near the end of the piece or when I readjusted my hands.
The use of in fed and out fed feather board prevented this wiggle. The feather boards do not need to place a lot of pressure on the piece just enough to hold it firmly against the fence.
--
2017: The year we learn to play the great game of Euchre

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 5:31:12 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Correct!

Correct!

Correct!
I'm suspecting the two fences, outfeed and infeed, are not parallel, despite their being offset. They are not exactly coplanar. They need to be offset and they also need to be perfectly coplanar.
I suspect your hand movement is giving you a misjudged idea of why you are having the bump. It's not your hand movement that's the (main, if at all) problem. Check to make sure your fences are coplanar, despite their being offset.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 11:54:31 PM UTC-6, Sonny wrote:

igned.

than

ite their being offset. They are not exactly coplanar. They need to be offset and they also need to be perfectly coplanar.

e having the bump. It's not your hand movement that's the (main, if at al l) problem. Check to make sure your fences are coplanar, despite their bei ng offset.

As to a dedicated jointer, both infeed and outfeed tables are normally para llel to one another. They need to be perfectly parallel. They are also o ffset, depending on how much wood thickness one wants to remove, and the in feed table is lowered by that much.
With the outfeed table lowered well below the infeed table (and cutter head ), one can purposely joint an arch, along the edge. In this case, the tabl es still remain coplanar.
The arch can also be done if the back end of the outfeed table is lowered r elative to the front end, i.e., angled, hence, the two tables are no longer coplanar, since the outfeed has been angled. This technique is rarely us ed, except for larger than "normal" arches, because it's sometimes difficul t to realign the table, perfectly parallel, to the infeed table. Once set , one should not mess with the alignment (coplanar) of the tables.
Again, check that your fences are coplanar, despite their being offset. W hatever straight edge you use for this gauging, double check that its edge is, in fact, straight. ....and the offset is what it's suppose to be all along the whole length of the outfeed fence, relative to the infeed fence. Relative to the infeed fence, if the offset is not the same all along the full length of the outfeed fence, then your fences are not coplanar.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You're not taking a big bite out of the wood. I can't imagine that your h and control is not adequate for stable/controlled cutting. If the coplana r hypothesis is not the problem, then the only other things I can think of is a dull bit or it's turning in the wrong direction.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 14, 2018 at 12:54:31 AM UTC-5, Sonny wrote:

Sonny, I'd love to agree with you here, but when I can hear the router change sounds and see the wood move away from the fence as I shift my hands, and then see the bump (or bumps) exactly where I expect them to be, I have to blame it on my hands.
Sometimes I get one if I am ever, so so careful and slow, others times I get 2 or 3, but they are *always* positioned exactly where the wood is contacting the bit when my hands shift position.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/14/2018 9:06 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

There is also the possibility that you are applying too much pressure and slightly bending the board as you are feeding it. If so the board could spring back slightly if even pressure is not applied.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 5:14:12 PM UTC-5, Sonny wrote:

Either I'm not understanding what you are saying or you misunderstand me. Not arguing, just trying to clarify.
Here's my side of it...let me know if I'm missing what you are saying.
When jointing on a router table, the fences are *supposed* to be mis-aligned. The out-feed fence is supposed to be about 1/16" closer to the operator than the in-feed fence.
Yes, fences are supposed to be mis-aligned but they are also supposed to be parallel. Yours don't seem to be. Easiest way to set them...
1. Set both sides in line, slightly back of front edge of bit
2. Run a piece of wood through until you have at least a foot on the outfeed side
3. Turn off router and close the gap between work piece and fence by moving outfeed fence to work piece
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/13/2018 4:10 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I have not joined on a router, but frequently use the router to create profiles on picture frames. I have found that I get the best results using feather boards on the in fed and out feed ends of the router. This then keeps the piece firmly against the fence on both sides to the bit for the length of the piece. With the fence I only have to keep the piece flat against the table, which I fine easier that trying to keep it against the fence and the table. Without the feather board I find the I tend to get waves in the route.
The router table is a Sears router table to which I attache a standard router. The fence is only about 18". I use a one piece fence with an opening for the bit. I have had good results using this technique with frames as long as 40 inches.
I suspect that the same technique may work when joining.
--
2017: The year we learn to play the great game of Euchre

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 5:55:47 PM UTC-5, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Just FYI...It's jointing, not joining.
When jointing on a router table, you don't want pressure on the in-feed fence. All pressure should be on the out-feed fence which is supposed to be proud of the in-feed fence and flush with the cutting surface of the bit. See here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6nql7mlSOo

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/13/2018 5:37 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I think it is joining.

Well, yes you do, until you have enough on the out feed side to apply pressure to and not both at the same time.
All pressure should be on the out-feed fence which is supposed

He acknowledges my comment above, pressure on the in feed to begin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 7:38:29 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

I'm pretty sure it's jointing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jointer http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?cat=1&pA801

Right. My problem is that with a 36" board, there is more time spent on the out-feed side than the in-feed side. What is your definition of "enough" on the out feed side? If I switch to putting pressure on the out-feed fence after 12" or even 18" I still have to move my hands at least once or I'll run out of fence or table from a "hand position" perspective. That's when my bump occurs.
https://i.imgur.com/hjSOHrP.jpg

No argument there. I'll agree that I wasn't clear when I talked about "no pressure on the in-feed fence". Obviously, you need pressure on the in_feed fence at the start of the feed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, it us a little confusing. A jointer is a machine, what Lee Valley is selling. The apparatus. To prepaid and join., is joining. :-)

It's hard enough on a small jointer. Settings have to be perfect. And as with most anything where you provide the fed rate an inconsistent feed rate results is an inconsistent result. Practice eventually makes perfect. My hat is off to you for giving this a try but, as you now see, this is not as easy as it appears.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 14, 2018 at 1:34:32 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

By "prepaid", I assume you mean "prepare". If that's the case, I have to respectfully disagree.
Maybe we aren't talking about the same thing or using the words in the same context. I was responding to Keith's comments, which involve the preparation step only.
First he said: "I have not joined on a router"
Then, after discusses his use of feathers boards on the in-feed and out-feed side he said "I suspect that the same technique may work when joining."
Therefore he is talking about the preparation of the edges only. As far as I can tell from everything I've read, the preparation step is called jointing.
From the same Veritas page:
"One of the great advantages of the Veritas router table fence is that it makes jointing easy." Jointing, as in the process, not the apparatus.
From (if you trust wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edge_jointing
Here they discuss both the preparation process (jointing), the apparatus (jointer) and the subsequent operation of putting the components together (joining).
"Edge jointing or just jointing is the process of making the edge of a wooden board straight and true in preparation for subsequent operations, often ultimately leading to joining two or more components together. Traditionally, jointing was performed using a jointer plane. Modern techniques include the use of a jointer machine, a hand held router and straight edge, or a table- mounted router. Although the process derives its name from the primary task of straightening an edge prior to joining, the term jointing is used whenever this process is performed, regardless of the application."
From: http://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/02/19/jointing-boards-for-dead-flat-panel-glue-ups
The title of article and video is "Jointing Boards for Dead-Flat Panel Glue-Ups"
I could go on. Everything I can find refers to the process of prepping the board as jointing. Then you join them, creating a joint.
I am certainly willing to admit being wrong, but then so must be all the sources that use the term jointing for the preparation process.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/14/2018 9:42 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yes, prepare. And NP if you disagree.

FWIW I used to call it jointing long ago....
But, https://www.festoolusa.com/products/domino-joining-system
We can leave it there. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The tool is jointer. The

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 3:10:56 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I have had good results clamping an aluminum straight edge to the top of the board and running a router along the side with a longish bit. I don't think I'd want to try using the router table for this purpose.
Best of luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.