Another Track Saw

On 2/3/2019 6:07 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The better track saws can replace a table saw. My Festool track saw cuts as accurately as my cabinet saw and delivers an extremely clean cut. These days I break down sheet goods, and the larger pieces are cut TO FINISHED DIMENSIONS, with my track saw.
The TS affords the ability to cut dado's and groves and cove cuts but if you only need beveled, straight cuts, or miter joints, most any track saw will deliver all you need.
If you are doing a lot of building, the TS is still the more comfortable tool for repetitive cuts and ultimately quicker for those cuts. But if you do not have a good TS a good track saw would probably fill 99% of your needs.
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On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 12:10:21 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

You obviously do more (and much better) wood working than me, but I'm still having trouble seeing that. Granted, I don't have a track saw to compare a TS with, so I have some questions. None of this is push-back, even if it sounds like it is. ;-)
How do you handle cuts that you would use a sled for? Small panels, etc?
What is the depth of cut? I can't rip 8/4 S2S boards with my circular saw and homemade luan straightedge, so I rip them on my table saw.
How narrow of a board can you rip?
Can you produce thin strips for edge banding?
Can you joint an edge? (I only ask because I don't have a joiner. For my current bench project I built a joiner fence for my table saw. It works really well for boards up to about 3 feet where it's fairly easy to keep consistent pressure on the fence. Joining 5' long 1-1/2" boards for the seat didn't work out as well.)
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On 2/6/2019 2:53 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Not a problem, I would be asking the same questions.
"Remember" the Festool MFT and the NEW Kreg track saw and "table" make things easier for all aspects of cutting small parts.

The MFT table allows you to raise and lock in an angle over the work. The work sits against an adjustable fence. That fence is set at 90 to the track or at an angle to the track. If necessary you can shorten the length of a board 1/64". This works similar to a RAS except instead of changing the boom angle you adjust the fence angle.
Go here and scroll through the picture examples of the saw and table.
https://www.festoolusa.com/products/semi-stationary-work/multifunction-table/495315---mft3

The Festool TS-75 will cut to a depth of 3" at 90 degrees and 2.125" at 45 degrees.
On the current project I needed to cut at a 7 degree angle on two pieces of same sized 3/4" thick pieces of MDO. I stacked the two pieces, clamped them together laid the track along the line to be cut, and made the cut.

With a little creative setting up, probably 1/2" or so. You place same thickness wider boards behind the narrow piece to support the track.

Absolutely

Absolutely and I do this when I buy S2S material.
(I only ask because I don't have a joiner. For

You do need to add the appropriate length track to accomplish this. I have 3 track lengths. When put together the two longer ones will rip an 8' long piece of plywood.
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On 2/6/2019 2:53 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Not a problem, I would be asking the same questions.
"Remember" the Festool MFT and the NEW Kreg track saw and "table" make things easier for all aspects of cutting small parts.
> > How do you handle cuts that you would use a sled for? Small panels, etc?
The MFT table allows you to raise and lock in an angle over the work. The work sits against an adjustable fence. That fence is set at 90 to the track or at an angle to the track. If necessary you can shorten the length of a board 1/64". This works similar to a RAS except instead of changing the boom angle you adjust the fence angle.
Go here and scroll through the picture examples of the saw and table.
https://www.festoolusa.com/products/semi-stationary-work/multifunction-table/495315---mft3
> > What is the depth of cut? I can't rip 8/4 S2S boards with my circular saw > and homemade luan straightedge, so I rip them on my table saw. The Festool TS-75 will cut to a depth of 3" at 90 degrees and 2.125" at 45 degrees.
On the current project I needed to cut at a 7 degree angle on two pieces of same sized 3/4" thick pieces of MDO. I stacked the two pieces, clamped them together laid the track along the line to be cut, and made the cut.
> > How narrow of a board can you rip? With a little creative setting up, probably 1/2" or so. You place same thickness wider boards behind the narrow piece to support the track.
> > Can you produce thin strips for edge banding? Absolutely
> > Can you joint an edge? Absolutely and I do this when I buy S2S material.
(I only ask because I don't have a joiner. For > my current bench project I built a joiner fence for my table saw. It > works really well for boards up to about 3 feet where it's fairly easy > to keep consistent pressure on the fence. Joining 5' long 1-1/2" boards > for the seat didn't work out as well.) > You do need to add the appropriate length track to accomplish this. I have 3 track lengths. When put together the two longer ones will rip an 8' long piece of plywood.
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On 2/6/2019 2:53 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:> On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 12:10:21 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote: >> On 2/3/2019 6:07 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote: >>> On Saturday, February 2, 2019 at 11:54:56 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote: >>>> Looks like Kreg is getting into the Track Saw game and it appears to >>>> offer features much like the Festool track saw and the Festool MFT table >>>> for cutting. >>>> Something interesting is the fact that the Kreg track saw is a lefty >>>> version. And it appears to possibly be made much like the Festool track >>>> saw, it has a lot of the same features for adjustments and methods of use. >>>> The system is is a basic copy of the Festool system but with added >>>> features. I really like the table folding up and being moveable with >>>> built in wheels. The Festool MFT only folds up and then you carry it >>>> around. >>>> Just the saw and a track long enough to cut across 50" will be $400.00. >>>> The cutting table with wheels kit will be $500.00 >>>> The Master kit that includes all of the above, $900.00. >>>> >>>> Like the Festool set up, you could probably get by with out a table saw >>>> and with the added benefit of portability. >>>> >>>> https://www.kregtool.com/landing/adaptive-cutting-system.aspx?source 77 >>>> >>> >>> What do you mean when you say "get by without a table saw"? >>> >> >> The better track saws can replace a table saw. My Festool track saw >> cuts as accurately as my cabinet saw and delivers an extremely clean cut. >> These days I break down sheet goods, and the larger pieces are cut TO >> FINISHED DIMENSIONS, with my track saw. >> >> The TS affords the ability to cut dado's and groves and cove cuts but if >> you only need beveled, straight cuts, or miter joints, most any track >> saw will deliver all you need. >> >> If you are doing a lot of building, the TS is still the more comfortable >> tool for repetitive cuts and ultimately quicker for those cuts. But if >> you do not have a good TS a good track saw would probably fill 99% of >> your needs. > > You obviously do more (and much better) wood working than me, but I'm still > having trouble seeing that. Granted, I don't have a track saw to compare > a TS with, so I have some questions. None of this is push-back, even if > it sounds like it is. ;-) Not a problem, I would be asking the same questions.
"Remember" the Festool MFT and the NEW Kreg track saw and "table" make things easier for all aspects of cutting small parts.
> > How do you handle cuts that you would use a sled for? Small panels, etc?
The MFT table allows you to raise and lock in an angle over the work. The work sits against an adjustable fence. That fence is set at 90 to the track or at an angle to the track. If necessary you can shorten the length of a board 1/64". This works similar to a RAS except instead of changing the boom angle you adjust the fence angle.
Go here and scroll through the picture examples of the saw and table.
https://www.festoolusa.com/products/semi-stationary-work/multifunction-table/495315---mft3
> > What is the depth of cut? I can't rip 8/4 S2S boards with my circular saw > and homemade luan straightedge, so I rip them on my table saw. The Festool TS-75 will cut to a depth of 3" at 90 degrees and 2.125" at 45 degrees.
On the current project I needed to cut at a 7 degree angle on two pieces of same sized 3/4" thick pieces of MDO. I stacked the two pieces, clamped them together laid the track along the line to be cut, and made the cut.
> > How narrow of a board can you rip? With a little creative setting up, probably 1/2" or so. You place same thickness wider boards behind the narrow piece to support the track.
> > Can you produce thin strips for edge banding? Absolutely
> > Can you joint an edge? Absolutely and I do this when I buy S2S material.
(I only ask because I don't have a joiner. For > my current bench project I built a joiner fence for my table saw. It > works really well for boards up to about 3 feet where it's fairly easy > to keep consistent pressure on the fence. Joining 5' long 1-1/2" boards > for the seat didn't work out as well.) > You do need to add the appropriate length track to accomplish this. I have 3 track lengths. When put together the two longer ones will rip an 8' long piece of plywood.
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On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 5:40:40 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Thanks. Here's a real life example that I ran into last night:
Picture my table saw with no fence installed and the blade lowered below the table. That's my typically set up, since I often use the TS as an extra work surface (small shop).
I needed a piece of 1/4" plywood cut to 9" x 12". I had a 24" x 24" piece.
I slapped the fence on the TS, raised the blade, made one cut. Moved the fence, made the second cut. Lowered the blade and hung the fence back on the wall. 2 minutes tops and I'm back to where I started.
How would you accomplish that same task with the track saw?
(Yes, I probably could have made 3 cuts with my miter saw, but that takes more set-up (measuring, etc.) and makes more of a mess. Let's just compare TS to track-saw for this task.)
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On 2/7/19 10:58 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

For that, yes, quicker on the TS. But let's add a couple factors. 1. Let's say, you need the same from a full sheet of 3/4" ply. It's always soooo much fun to cross cut full sheets on a tablesaw in a small shop, right? 2. Let's say you need to do the same thing, on a job site.
Generally, it's easier to move whatever is smaller across whatever is bigger. In your case, it's easier to move a 24"x24" piece across a tablesaw. In the case of a full sheet, it's easier to move the tool across the piece.
Same with a router vs. router table.
As for a track saw. There are a couple guys who are prominent on social media who build a LOT of really nice built ins and that's pretty much all they do. Both of these guys have recently blogged that they are doing it all on-site with their track saws and don't use their table saws at all.
Most track saw makers also make router guides that fit their tracks, so it makes it just as easy to switch to the router for dados and rabbets on-site.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 12:19:13 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:

#1 means that I should have both. Then I can stand outside my shop and look at all the nice tools that I can't use because there's only room for the tools. ;-)
A full sheet in my shop would essentially be the shop.

But that's not happening in my shop. So I guess it's a track saw for the garage and a TS for the shop. SWMBO will be so pleased. ;-)

Which brings up the other issue. My router table is built into my table saw. If I replaced the TS with a track saw set-up, I'd need to built a dedicated router table. Now I'm back to the space issue.
Can a router table be integrated into a track saw table like it can be with a TS?

How are small pieces dealt with on a job site? Do you guys haul around bench top router tables?
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On 2/7/2019 11:49 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

OK, just for the record, I am not suggesting getting rid of a TS and replacing with a track saw. But if you don't have either and limited space a track saw should be looked at closely. And especially if you are working on location away from the shop.
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OOps
Sorry for the triple post.
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On Wednesday, February 6, 2019 at 5:43:39 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

I assumed you just trying to make your point. ;-)
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