Use washing line to support cable with an electric mower

I've had an electric mower for over two years and each time the ruddy cable is a pain. Keeps getting in the way. I prefer a petrol-driven mower, which I also have, but after the heart op two years ago I was strongly advised NOT to use the recoil starter. And so I purchased the Bosch lightweight electric mower. (It is VERY light!)
So, day before yesterday I fetched out the mower for the first time after winter and once again laid the orange cable out of reach of the cutter. What I could do with, I thought, was a helper (person) to pay out just the right amount of cable as I perambulate around the lawn with the thing. A robot would also do the trick, but for the money I could employ a gardener.
That's when I saw the washing line, as if for the first time. What if I draped the cable over the line? At least it wouldn't then be lying on the grass. So I did, and the results were fantastic! Not as good as a helper (person) or a robot, but way better than letting the cable get in the way all the time. Sort of like a giant version of this amazing gadget, which I've had on my ironing board for ages: http://tinyurl.com/ironholderminky
Gonna put my thinking cap on this afternoon and draw up a project to design a cable letter-outer/puller-inner, which would be wireless controlled by voice from a Bluetooth headset. I'll draw up the patent application tomorrow.
By the way, now that my chest has healed I can use the petrol mower again, so ordered a new blade as the current one was as old as the mower (12+ years).
However, the new blade doesn't look any sharper than the old one! So that was a waste of 11 quid.
MM
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On 19/04/15 13:26, MM wrote:

Possibly a bit late, but the Bosch Rotak battery 36V LiIon mower is better than you might imagine - I would say that it is actually quite good as a mower in absolute terms and bloody excellent when you factor in it is light weight and has no cable.
2 batteries and you can just about keep going - one runs for about 30 mins of hard mowing, the charge time is maybe an hour so allowing for stopping and a tea break...

But that is indeed a great idea. Cables always seem to alighn themselves with the path of the next cut no matter what direction you are mowing in...

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Great minds think alike, etc.
My late father ended up with a battery powered mower, very light and easy to use. He only had the one battery and thought it was great. By the time the battery had gone flat so had he. So it was the perfect excuse for an hours break and a cup of tea!
--
Bill

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We have an acre of lawn.
And a ride-on mower.
--
Today is Prickle-Prickle, the 36th day of Discord in the YOLD 3181
I don't have an attitude problem.
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Huge wrote:

    Civilised!
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Capitol wrote:

We have 2.5 acres. And we can borrow wool-covered fully automatic mowers any time.
Bill
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Bill Wright wrote:

    Yes, but they're very good garden destroyers also!
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Show off!
*I* grew up in a very large house, so there! https://www.facebook.com/ExtraordinaryGhostHunters/photos/pb.258134740874703.-2207520000.1429454097./367164019971774/?type=1&theater
https://www.facebook.com/ExtraordinaryGhostHunters/photos/pb.258134740874703.-2207520000.1429454097./367163886638454/?type=1&theater
My parents ran it until 1975, then it was owned by someone else for 20-odd years, and now it's derelict. Plot was going for £2.5 million till it was taken off the market for some reason. My bro said he'd buy it and restore it if he won the lottery.
But we didn't have a ride-on mower! Mum had a Jersey cow, which could have been ridden, I suppose.
MM
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[18 lines snipped]

Wow. That looks like it must have been nice, once. Too big for us. Hell, our house, which is about half the size of that, is too big for us, now. Too much maintenance. Too much bloody grass to mow.
--
Today is Prickle-Prickle, the 36th day of Discord in the YOLD 3181
I don't have an attitude problem.
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It was nice. It was friggin' amazing! I was 19 when we moved there. My bro 10 years younger, so he got to know it much better. I left in 1969 to seek work in Germany. My dad worked his b*llocks off, commuting to London every day for 20 years as an accountant, plus working on the house and grounds in the evenings and weekends. He must have been constantly knackered. My mum ran the place as an old people's home "For Retired Gentlefolk", all of whom lived out their final years in very pleasant surroundings. Mum did of course have several helpers to help with the laundry, washing up, cooking, cleaning, caring and so on, but she, too, worked her fingers to the bone. She looked after the flower gardens at the front, while dad kept up the market garden round the back which itself was at least half an acre. Dad had green fingers, so we got most of our veg from the garden. As a farmer's daughter, mum always wanted her own cow, and when the Jersey arrived, she quickly got to milk it. She didn't have to learn. It's like riding a bike. She grew up on a farm in Herefordshire. She bought a separator, extracted the thick Jersey cream from the milk and made butter, also something she had to learn to do as a child in a family of nine or ten siblings (I've lost count of just how many, because Uncle Gilbert was killed in the first months of the war (WW2) in the Battle of the River Plate, and an aunt died quite young.)
Then in 1975 they retired. Sadly, after only five years of retirement and a busy life of caring for others (she was a nurse in World War 2), as well as bringing up a family, my mother died of a heart attack aged 60 in 1980.
In one way I am glad they are both long gone now, since it would kill them to see what has become of the place since they left.
MM
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On 19/04/2015 14:02, Huge wrote:

I have decking and slate chippings. And a comfy seat where I can sit drinking beer while other mow their lawns.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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On 19/04/15 17:53, The Medway Handyman wrote:

One day, when the wibbling house is done, I will do a bit of landscaping in the garden (levels are everywhere).
I will reseed the lawn with something soft and slow growing. Where I've repaired and reseeded areas, I have grass that is either fine and slow or goes "boing" and is 6" high when all around is 3". Because I just bought random packets of seeds for that temporary fix...
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The Medway Handyman wrote:

    Well, you're welcome to the decking, I prefer longer lived systems, however, slate chippings can be a pain when next door reseeds their lawn, as we found out the hard way.
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wrote:

It is too late now! I already have: petrol Champion, an ancient but working Suffolk Punch, a hand mower, and the Bosch cable.
But my experience of tools that require charging has not been great. I have tried three battery hand-held vacuum cleaners, one hedge trimmer, and a screwdriver and in all cases the batteries failed after a year or two. The hedge trimmer was the worst. It was an Argos brand, I believe. Only cost around 20 quid. But useless, as it only retained a charge for about 30 minutes. I gave it away and bought almost the same model, but with a cable. It would take A LOT to convince me to buy ~any~thing with a battery, whether one of those expensive £199 vacuum cleaner jobbies from the telly, or an electric car. I would certainly never consider a rechargeable drill or similar, although I can see how one of those is probably useful in the trade where there is no power point handy.
The only gadget I have that has proved reliable with a battery is my APC UPS (Back-UPS CS 500) which has needed only one replacement battery in seven years. Mind you, that only gets used IF the mains power fails.

Yep, done it again like that and it definitely makes the job easier.
MM
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MM wrote:

    One of my favourite toys is the electric wheelbarrow. It needs a new 70AH battery every 5 years but for general heavy porting jobs it's a delight and robust. Wildly over priced, but I'd buy it again.
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wrote:

It's not April 1st, is it? ;)
I'd never heard of an electric wheelbarrow till now!
MM
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I expect Capitols is a fairly heavy duty one but approx a decade ago B and Q stocked thes ,possibly only one batch.
https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/usedphotosna/40758737_614.jpg
Can't remember what I paid now ,somewhere between £100-£150 which may have been a sale price. Proved to be a boon to my elderly Father who was then in his early eighties . Main Job was moving Logs from the various sheds where they were stored till seasoned and into the porch ready for the Rayburn. Unlike some of the powered wheel barrows I have seen this little plastic job called the LUV which stood for Lawn Utility Vehicle had low sides which made loading easy and being a trycycle design did not require any lifting action from an elderley body. Did the job admirably for a decade till he got too old even to walk far. I did had to repair the direction switch but,that was the fault of my young Nephew and Neice or rather my Sister who let them treat it as a Toy one afternoon and they rode around in it as if it was a Dodgem car. Got rid of after Dad died and Mother moved on, no further use for it and the battery needed replacing by then. It was a US firm who had had it made but when I looked up for a new switch it had already changed hands once and wasn't being sold anymore. G.Harman
G.Harman
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

    The family bought me mine. About £550 IIRC. Uses a wheelchair motor.
    > http://www.easybarrow.co.uk/powered equipment/big_page_PPP01.html
    We went to a funeral yesterday, so I pointed out to my wife, that to avoid paying for a hearse to carry our coffins, we would have to buy a new battery for the wheelbarrow! We live about 1200yards from the crematorium, mostly down hill!
    
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On 19/04/2015 13:34, Tim Watts wrote:

I noticed in Toolstation this weekend, that they're flogging a 40V battery mower for 200 quid. They reckoned the battery included was worth 100. It sounded a bit weak to me at 2Ah but maybe that depends on how hard you work a mower (ie how in/frequently you use it).
I'm sure the Rotak is in a different league (and comes with much more capacity) but it seems simplest to stick with petrol to me (all things being equal, which they clearly aren't in your case).
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On Sunday, 19 April 2015 13:26:41 UTC+1, MM wrote:

Mower blades benefit from frequent sharpening. All it takes it a grindstone and a drill.
NT
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