OT - UK Power Networks extra support in power cut - elderly?

I have recently received an email from UK Power Networks inviting me to register for additional help in the event of a power cut.
Qualifications are:
"Who can apply
• Customers who are dependent on medical equipment • Customers who are chronically ill
• Customers with a disability
• Customers who are visually impaired or blind
• Customers who are hearing impaired or deaf
• Elderly customers
• A nursing or residential home
• Customers with young babies in household
• Any other case that you would like us to consider"
[Spaced out to prevent PAN scrunging it all together.]
One thing that struck me - nowhere does it define "Elderly".
I have passed the 65 point and am now in receipt of a State Pension (what would one have been described as an Old Age Pensioner) so presumably I may be considered to be "Elderly" but given that the pension age is rapidly receding (I got mine just in time) there does seem to be no fixed point.
Strange that they don't give any guidance. Presumably avoiding conflict and allowing anyone who feels "elderly" to apply. The application form doesn't ask for age, either, so presumably if you are feeling clapped out at 50 you still qualify.
I also have a chronic disease - T2 Diabetes - which is currently (thankfully) well managed.
So I don't feel vulnerable to a power cut; firing up the wood burner and rigging temporary lighting from the little Honda generator would be more fun than anything else. Defence in depth - we could always live in the camper for a few days until local bottled gas supplies ran out, at least.
Is this all a plot to make me feel old?
Cheers
Dave R
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David wrote:

interpretations would vary, I would say 80+

FFS
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On 06/02/2016 12:54, Andy Burns wrote:

Wnat's so wrong with the second one? These days, for a lot of people no power means no heat or hot water.
Although I do think it is a bit of an arse padding exercise.
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Elderly babies?
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Adam


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On Sat, 06 Feb 2016 14:53:50 +0000, ARW wrote:

Mentioning no regular posters to this NG, obviously ;-)
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Not something that you should need 'additional help' with if the power goes out for a while.

But even those with young babies in the household can do fine without those for quite a while even if their heat is entirely electric. Doesn’t make any sense for UK Power Networks to be showing up with gas bottles and a heater etc when the parents can just put the brat in bed under blankets etc at worst.

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On Sat, 6 Feb 2016 12:54:06 +0000, Andy Burns wrote:

Quite, babies are pretty damn tough, they frequently get pulled out alive from collaspsed building a week or more after an earthquake. I think they are just to young to realise that they ought to be dead, so don't die.
Do people slob about their homes in just a T shirt and boxers? And not have a jumper or coat to put on if the heating fails or a decent duvet and blanket or two and everyone snuggle up together. Baby will really like that so you only do it when you have to.
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On Sunday, 7 February 2016 01:13:07 UTC, Dave Liquorice wrote:

So many youngsters seem to be whining wimps now.
NT
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On Sat, 06 Feb 2016 12:54:06 +0000, Andy Burns wrote:

I think the main issue is those who are vulnerable due to poor health in old age - some of them may not be mobile enough to quickly put on additional clothing (they may even need the help of a carer) and their metabolism may not be robust enough to generate enough heat to keep them warm even if they are wrapped up.
Tricky if your woolly jumper is upstairs but you need the stair lift to get it.
There are also those who depend on a power recliner to rest comfortably during the day and could be unable to get out of it when reclined - those chairs tend to sit you upright then lean forward to propel you towards your Zimmer frame. You could freeze and starve if stuck in one of them.
So a register of those who are vulnerable is a very good idea - especially if it is coordinated with support services who can go to the house and help if the power is out.
Nobody so far has said that they are 65 and feel elderly :-)
Cheers
Dave R
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David wrote:

yes, certainly worthwhile the supply company knowing where vulnerable people live. I wouldn't put a healthy baby in that category.

Aren't they all battery driven? My parents' one is.
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<snip> >Tricky if your woolly jumper is upstairs but you need the stair lift to

<snip>
I thought most stair lifts were battery backed for that very reason? ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On 07/02/2016 13:05, David wrote:

Stair lifts are battery powered but I don't know how many trips you could make on one with the charger off.

That's why they also have battery backup if they are bought for the immobile.
I doubt if anyone tests the battery when they should.
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Doesn’t need to be done quickly.

So the set of questions should have asked whether they have one.
But there is no reason why someone who needs a carer to help them to put on clothes is any different after the power has failed than anyone else.
and their

There is no one like that.

You could get real radical and have another kept downstairs.

But if you are in that situation, you should have some way of calling for assistance if you live alone and so can just use that if the lack of power means you are stuck there.

Makes more sense for those who live alone and who likely to end up in that situation to have some way of calling for assistance all the time, not just when the power is out.

I'm quite a bit older than that and don’t feel elderly at all.
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On 06/02/2016 12:50, David wrote:

The one I just had defined "old" as 65. I didn't tick any of the other boxes but it seemed to me no harm could come from registering; at best, it might raise a flag if I phone in with a fault.
Struck me as being no bad thing to have a register to include people with stair lifts, oxygen concentrators, etc. ahead of any disruption, especially a widespread one.
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On 06/02/2016 13:33, newshound wrote:

They are getting ready for the rolling power cuts. They don't really want to cut people off with medical equipment.
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I do wonder just what that help would be? I really can't see them installing a temporary generator for all those classes.
Cynical me says it may be just a PR exercise.
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*A woman drove me to drink and I didn't have the decency to thank her

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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Some ~20 years ago, my street reached the point where the ring mains was broken in 2 places underground, and although we all still had power through backfeeding, they decided they needed to repair it. That was a planned outage for a day, and a large generator was parked up to keep power on to 1 or 2 houses for the day. I didn't know the people in those, but I guess there was someone with a medial need.
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about 18 months ago, a builder 3 doors down the road managed to put a short on the electricty feeder cable taking out supply to 5 houses. We had a genny parked in the drive for 5 days. As did the other houses. No query about need. But then, the builder's insurance company was paying for it.
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wrote:

More likely they are attempting to keep track of what areas can be turned off if there are rolling blackouts without anyone dying etc. Corse that obviously depends on how fine grained they can turn things off with streets of houses etc.
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On 06/02/2016 16:26, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Indeed! At best, they're going to restore power on a per-substation rather than per-premises basis. I suppose it's possible that they could prioritise substations with a high proportion of vulnerable people, but if such people are evenly distributed, forget it!
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Cheers,
Roger
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