OT android P

Is google taking the P by having a monochrome mode so you aren't affected by blue light before you go to bed? Do they know that the white is R+G+B and that B stands for Blue?
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On Tuesday, 7 August 2018 15:00:26 UTC+1, dennis@home wrote:

doesn't that depend on what you mean or rather they mean by monochrome.
perhaps they are just trying to copy apples night mode.
https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT207570
which goes red .
perhaps if anyone has a google phone they could let us know.
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On 07/08/2018 15:00, dennis@home wrote:

If they alter it to warm white colour temperature that will probably be good enough to avoid the worst effects of blue light on the brain.
Plenty of star chart apps have a night mode where "monochrome" actually means various intensities of red which doesn't affect night vision.
https://sites.google.com/site/starchartuserguide/night-mode
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On 07/08/2018 15:33, Martin Brown wrote:

The value of red torches to astronomers is well known. I am less convinced by the currently fashionable "blue stops you sleeping" argument. Although deliberately "warming" the screen colours both simulates the colour of twilight and opens the iris, so could provide genuine physiological triggers for sleep.
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On Tuesday, 7 August 2018 15:40:05 UTC+1, newshound wrote:

But I;ve seen test that prove it or rather support it. The use of proper SAD lighting uses blue.
Someone run an expeiment in a pub on differnt night they used differnt colour lighting. Asking peole what they thought the efect would be and it was that red light would make you feel more thirty as you'd think you were hotter. But what they foudn was peole stayed much longer upto an hour if the light was blue, blue light does have more energy than the same amount of red light.
https://bluwinx.com/sleep/how-does-blue-light-affect-your-sleep/
but as people are differnt a friend of mione last night got up at 11:30am yesterday while I was up at 7:30am By 1am he was falling asleep I was checking facxebook, we had the same lighting.
Maybe yuo should try it on yourself.

and doing the oppersite should.....
https://bluwinx.com/sleep/how-does-blue-light-affect-your-sleep/
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The problem needs to be licked for us blind folk who get visual disturbances. I can be dazzled in the night merely by noise from the defunct retina or optic nerve, a kind of visual tinnitus. Its one of those problems we have that no doctors has ever seen, as for obvious reasons, only we see it. I was almost arrested once for having pupils that dilate and go back to normal for no apparent reason, the guy thought I had taken a dodgy substance you see! I of course was unaware of the pupil issue, but thinking about it if the brain thinks you are dazzled it would be a reflex action. Brian
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On 07/08/2018 15:40, newshound wrote:

Although it turns out to not be that clear an advantage even there. Very dim white light is easier to see by even for astronomers - red light is harder for the eye to focus well.

I think there might be an element of truth in it.
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So why is radar green? Brian
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Cos that was the cheapest long persistent phosphor originally and they kept using that color.

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On 07/08/2018 20:18, Brian Gaff wrote:

It's not. 50 years ago with CRTs it may have been displayed as green for the same reason that early word processors used green screens.
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On 07/08/18 21:09, alan_m wrote:

ready availability of high output green phosphors
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Somewhere buried at the back of my mind the display colour of early CRT screens depended on the manufacturer of the glass. German or British.

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writes

It was the phosphor, not the glass.
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On Tue, 07 Aug 2018 21:20:15 +0100, Tim Lamb wrote:

It was just the use of a very long persistence phosphor required for oscilloscope CRTs which then found its way into the early PPI radar display tubes. I think the fact that the phosphor chosen happened to be green in colour was secondary to its more desirable property of long persistence.
There may have been other colours of long persistence phosphors available but I suspect the green one was probably deemed the best overall choice at that time, over 70 years ago (at least by British and American manufacturers - the Germans may have chosen another colour of long persistence phosphor but that doesn't address Brian's question).
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On Tuesday, 7 August 2018 21:21:37 UTC+1, Tim Lamb wrote:

that was still very much true in the 80s. Some CRTs had a positively odd gamut. I don't think it was due to the glass but not sure on that point.
NT
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writes

I know it wasn’t because I was buying them then.
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On 08/08/2018 04:02, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

There were certainly some long persistence orange glow phosphor screen oscilloscopes available in the dim and distant past. Some also had an illuminated dot of s different colour - useful for radar. See:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphor#Standard_phosphor_types

The problem was that although pure green and red were easy to do the pure blue phosphors proved very elusive and was pale blue due to yellow impurities in the light produced. This was fixed by adding a trace of neodymium to the front screen to knock out the unwanted yellow.
Initially they over corrected leading to cartoon like real world colours as opposed to the pastel shades of the earlier "colour" sets. Early colour TV sets tended to go wrong a lot - and had a rather dangerous Xray emitting EHT stack at the back. Made hiring one cost effective unless you could do your own repairs.
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On Wednesday, 8 August 2018 09:30:36 UTC+1, Martin Brown wrote:

It's unfortunate that I can't remember exactly what the primaries were on t he sets I'm talking about. I vaguely remember the green being a yellow-gree n. The end result was a much warmer toned picture that surprisingly looked ok on most scenes, but now & then looked quite off. Sat next to the usual R GB displaying a test card showed how off they were - some of the card colou rs just weren't the right colour at all.
NT
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I was thinking much further back... early days of radiation experimentation.
I'll see if I can find where I read it. Ah! I have it:-) Alfred Romer, The restless atom.
Cathode rays, if close enough, lit up the glass which was green for English lime glass and blue for the lead glass of the Germans.
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On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 20:26:34 +0100, Tim Lamb wrote:

A friend of mine at school got hold of a 5FP7 - radar tube with (I think) green trace and long persistence yellow.
He built a TV with it. It was weird to watch.
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