OT 35mm SLR camera

On Tue, 29 Nov 2016 17:02:51 +0000, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:

The sheer speed and sense of timing possessed by the supremely skilled photojournalists of half a century ago borders on the supernatural.
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But not the impossible.
--
Some "chinese english" instructions (with software for a camera card). This is the contents of a file named "English installs the elucidation.doc", quoted in its entirety:

The high regard's customer:
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On Tue, 29 Nov 2016 22:50:42 +0000, James Wilkinson Sword wrote:
I think those instructions are *still* in Chinese, mate. ;-)
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Nope, they get the best shots by luck.
Obviously they do have to know where to stand to get the best shots with the available lighting etc, but after that its luck.
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On 23/11/2016 23:56, Andrew wrote:

What tosh! I use all the skills I learnt in the film days when I use my digital SLR.
Bill
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On 29/11/2016 02:44, Bill Wright wrote:

And a few more but you don't ever need to learn them on a film camera. Its also not easier to learn them on a film camera.
About the only thing you need film for is learning darkroom techniques and that isn't how to take a picture.
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All of them? With film, you had to take into account the type of film in use. With a digital camera, you can't change the sensor the image falls on.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 29/11/2016 10:46, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

You can change the effective ISO. Things like saturation and grain you can alter in post processing. So it still helps to understand the relationship between aperture, shutter speed, and film (or sensor) sensitivity.
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John.
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Yes. A throwback to film days. It should have been binned, and a new term used.

True.

You need to understand the optical side. Because that hasn't changed at all. The way the sensor reacts - between film and electronic - is different. And trying to use one set of rules for both is not the best way.
And isn't new. The same sort of differences were apparent from the start of live TV, using electronic cameras.
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lm

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erm

Why?
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wrote:

But there is no point in learning that by farting around with film anymore, it makes a lot more sense to learn it with a decent digital system instead and be able to try a lot more things for free and quickly than is viable with film.
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On 11/23/2016 11:26 PM, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Horses for courses innit. Film isn't "better" than digital any more than vinyl is better than CD or VHS is better than DVD: they are all artistic media and in my opinion with quite different qualities and strengths and weaknesses.
I have several digital cameras and they are absolutely brilliant for some kinds of work: I tend to use them for the more industrial kind of photography where accuracy and precision are what I'm looking for. But since the price of film cameras has tumbled to the point where I can easily afford to buy the kind of kit I could only have dreamt of in the past I've been doing a lot more work with film in recent times.
Another factor I've discovered is a sort of analogy with quantum physics where the act of observation affects that which is being observed. Example: I was photographing a demonstration which was processing down Avenida de Mayo in Buenos Aires this February just gone when I realised that the protestors were "opening up" to me in an entirely different way compared to passers by with camera phones and the press with their state of the art gear. Why? It was my twin-lens reflex medium-format film camera, that's why. I captured "stories" more than "photographs" that day.
Nick
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On 23/11/2016 17:41, Richard wrote:

I had several Canon cameras ... you could change the back for a 'data back' allowing you to superimpose numbers & text onto negative as pic taken.
Feasible to evolve that to a fullframe digital sensor ... but why would you want it ? Camera software has come on amazingly since 35mm days, to get that you need more modern lenses and the new electronic bodies - so market to sell 'digital' conversion is very very small.
Plus manufacturers have a vested interest in selling new product - they would rather you buy a new camera.
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On 23/11/2016 17:26, harry wrote:

The lens is probably worth more than the camera body as long as it hasnt got a lot of dirt or worse still fungus in it. Check eBay for what they are fetching. I sell 35mm cameras and lenses regularly in my local charity shop or on eBay. Nikon lenses are always in demand but there is a good niche market for most (not APS) film cameras and 35mm, 120, 127 and even 110 film is available.
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On Wednesday, November 23, 2016 at 7:17:21 PM UTC, Robert wrote:

I was curious to see if you can still get APS film - no; discontinued in 2011, although there are still labs who will print from them.
APS always seemed like a solution to a non-existent problem; a bit like the MiniDisk. The panorama mode was really rubbish, just a very severe crop of a single frame.
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Eh? Minidisc was brilliant. For certain things. Mainly pro or semi pro use, as well as replacing the cassette.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Wed, 23 Nov 2016 09:26:18 -0800, harry wrote:

Come on, Harry. You could have just looked on Ebay. These film cameras are AFAIK still required equipment for photography students, so that alone should support a market in them. But a growing number of people are going back to film for b/w usage, using classic, high quality cameras and developing tanks for the negs but doing the rest via film scanners and image editors and computer photo printers. A kind of retro movement similar to the rise in interest in vinyl records.
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Why would photography students be required to learn using film? Learning is about experimentation and seeing what happens if you get it wrong, and digital has the big advantage over film that all your photos are free, so there is encouragement to experiment. OK, so you don't learn about film-specific things like increased grain with increased film speed, reciprocity failure (*), push-processing to increase contrast, effect on contrast of a print of under- or over-exposing a negative - but then you only *need* to know about those things if you are using film.
As long as your camera has manual or semi-auto settings (ie that you don't just use auto-everything mode all the time) then you can learn the principles of photography more quickly and much more cheaply with a digital camera.
(*) With film, very short or very long shutter speeds mean that the rule "double the aperture and half the shutter speed gives the same exposure" is no longer true - and with colour film the effect is different for the various colour-sensitive layers, so you get a colour cast.
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On 23/11/2016 19:47, NY wrote:

If they are using film do they learn about sensor noise and why old film lenses don't produce as good an image as a modern lens when used on a digital camera?
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No point in learning that when they wont be using film cameras.
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