Kitchen sink mixer tap drips - can it be fixed?

HI Folks We had a lever-operated kitchen kitchen sink mixer tap fitted about four years ago - in the past few months it's started dripping. It has quarter-turn levers - I'm guessing that these operate ceramic valves?
If so - does anybody have experience of obtaining replacement valves, and how are they fitted. I'm expecting that the lever is held on by a screw, under the end-cover - but how do you get the conical cover off without damaging the chrome?
Anybody been there & done that, successfully?
Photo of what looks to be the same beast here - (Amazon.com product link shortened)
I notice that the Amazon item carries a 15-year guarantee - "(excluding working and serviceable parts, abuse or neglect)" - we have pumped well-water supply - so it's quite possible that some grit as found its way into the valve...
Thanks, Adrian
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On Wed, 27 Dec 2017 21:48:29 +0000, Adrian Brentnall

You'll probably find what you want here https://www.tapmagician.co.uk/TMDefault.aspx????? or more specifically, here https://www.tapmagician.co.uk/TMDefault.aspx?400
I had/have a similar problem. You need to get the size of the alumina disc inserts specific to your tap, which means going through the dismantling process twice, once to measure the discs and the second to change them. Don't forget to turn the water off first. The images on that web site give you an idea as to how they come apart. Remove the lever by removing the plastic cap on top of the tap, to expose the screw which you undo and then lift or knock/tap off the lever upwards. You can then unscrew the body from the tap fitting, pull out the coloured (red or blue) washer at the bottom and then remove the alumina disc inserts. Not difficult.
The only problem I had was that I couldn't find an exact match for my discs. So I swapped over the hot and cold discs, reassembled the whole thing and for a while the tap stopped dripping, although I see it's recently started again.
If you live in a hard water area, then deposits of lime may have built up on the discs. Soaking them overnight in vinegar may be all that's needed.
Failing all that, simply buy a whole new pair of cartridges.
--

Chris

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On 27/12/2017 22:43, Chris Hogg wrote:

HI Chris Ah - you've been there too <g>. I don't think I want to get down to 'component level' one the repair / replacement - but I suppose it's good to know it's possible. Seems that a pair of replacement cartridges will set me back UKP 30, while Amazon will sell me a complete new (shiny!) tap for only €25 more - so I'm tempted just to drop a new one in....
I've changed hundreds of 'old-fashioned' tap washers in the past - but this is the first time I've needed to fiddle with one of the quarter-turn jobbies... hence the reason for asking.
Thanks Adrian
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On 27/12/2017 22:43, Chris Hogg wrote:

Assuming you can find somewhere that sells the oddball type of cartridges that your taps need. There are quite a few variations.
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On 29/12/2017 17:22, Andrew wrote:

More than a few! I'm lucky to have a plumbers merchants in town that has extensive stock. Never let me down. Yet!
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On 27/12/17 22:24, jim wrote:

Might be of use: https://www.tapsandsinksonline.co.uk/7-easy-steps-to-replace-kitchen-tap-valve/
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On 27/12/2017 22:48, Richard wrote:

Yes - very handy, thanks. Looks like €30 plus p&p for a pair of valves. The complete tap cost about €130, four years ago, and I see that the same tap unit is available brand new on Amazon for UKP 54.... so it may make more sense to replace the whole tap.
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On 28/12/2017 08:11, Adrian Brentnall wrote:

Get the whole tap and you'll be able to see how the handles come apart, plus have some spare bits. It's a faff to replace the tap body, but it's easy to replace all the moving parts.
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On 27/12/2017 21:48, Adrian Brentnall wrote:

Yup pretty likely...

Take off the H/C cap - should unscrew. Then remove the screw and the lever should come off. The conical trims ought not be done up that tight - you may find you can undo by hand or with a "gripper" glove. If you need to use grips (water pump pliers etc), then shims of leather or a short length of rubber hose (plumbers merchant - they sell it for connections to manometers and gas pressure meters) make good grippy protectors.

You may find just unscrewing the valve, and pulling the disks out f the end of it (you normally need to prise off a retaining C clip on the shaft), will let you clean them - often that is enough if they are still nice and smooth. A descale, and re-lube with silicone grease can also help.

Yup, they don't like grit... I fitted a good quality new mixer a coupe of days back, and managed to get some debris in there that caused it to leak on about the third use (probably some solder residue, or copper fragments etc). The dismantle and rub discs between fingers procedure fixed that.
--
Cheers,

John.
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On 28/12/2017 03:31, John Rumm wrote:

Ah - there's some ideas - thanks

Ah - having said that I'm considering replacing the whole thing, you've now appealed to the skinflint in me! <g> Trouble is, it's the Kitchen Tap - so any prolonged faffing about with it isn't likely to be popular....

Ah - that's worth knowing. 'Spose I could try, it'd be a nice 'eco-friendly' fix if it was something that simple..
Thanks Adrian
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On 28/12/2017 08:21, Adrian Brentnall wrote:

Its also only a 10 minute job[1], so worth a punt!
[1] or at least would be, if having prised the clip off, it did not drop to the floor, roll, and then fall with a clink into a large exposed section of floor void that I have open for pipe wrangling...
Ten mins later hunting about in all the crap and sawdust that accumulates under floors, to find it sitting there straddling an old discarded floor board nail like a rather good shot in horse shoe hurling!
--
Cheers,

John.
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On 28/12/2017 12:42, John Rumm wrote:

I'm glad it's not just me! <g>
I might dig out my strap wrench (or similar) and give it a go. After all - it'll take another week before online folks are back at work, and then it'll be another week before the new item gets to Ireland from the UK..... - so it's probably worth a punt.
Step one - see if the covers can be removed - they've been made helpfully conical, so getting a decent grip on them will be a challenge!
Thanks Adrian
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On Thu, 28 Dec 2017 18:03:02 +0000, Adrian Brentnall

Another tip, as well as turning off the water, put the plug in the hole (saves having to crawl about under the sink uncoupling the waste trap, to recover that little screw with the totally unique thread and diameter)!
--

Chris

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On 28/12/2017 19:08, Chris Hogg wrote:

Good thought. One of those 'obvious after the fact' things <g> Thanks
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On 28/12/2017 21:51, Adrian Brentnall wrote:

My darling wife *now* puts the plug in when removing her contact lenses.
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On 28/12/2017 21:51, Adrian Brentnall wrote:

As Peter Parry would probably point out, it's at this point you discover that the gate valve that shuts off the supply from the hot tank to the kitchen tap is seized solid.
You decide to be brave and whip out the old one and screw in the new using an old towel to stop the hot water splashing around but you cross thread the new one in the process.
By this time hot water at 60 Centigrade has made it to the tap and you cannot screw or unscrew the new ceramic unit, while hot water is pissing everywhere all around you .....
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On 29/12/2017 17:31, Andrew wrote:

At which point the more prudent, would stick a bung into the outlet pipe of the cold cistern ;-)
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Cheers,

John.
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On 27/12/2017 21:48, Adrian Brentnall wrote:

Correct.

If it's knurled I usually use water pump pliers & a cloth.

Many times.

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Dave
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HI Dave!
On 29/12/2017 10:11, TMH wrote:

Grand

Nope - smooth as a smooth thing, and tapered with it. The 'hot' once loosened off with a grippy garden glove - the cold one won't budge (so far). Gave it a bit of limescale remover, might whip the lever off and see if that give me better access...
Thanks Adrian
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On 29/12/2017 11:18, Adrian Brentnall wrote:

Grippy glove and water pump pliers?

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