Hedge trimmer flex [cable?] repair. Cheapest safe method?



Why is everyone suggesting a 'plug-and-socket' arrangment for a repair? When someone (cough) did mine, I repaired it with something along these lines: http://www.partmaster.co.uk/image/420/1288430IM/0/z/
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David

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On 12/05/2015 08:30, Lobster wrote:

Is that IP44 rated, which the Duraplug connector is?
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Colin Bignell

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No, i imagine not, but you can get suitable connectors.
However, as others have suggested, using a plug and socket is useful, so worth just using that instead,
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Chris French


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On 11/05/2015 21:14, Andy Burns wrote:

On the surface a brilliant idea, precisely what I did when I cut through the wire on mine.
However a plug and socket arrangement is a nightmare, the slightest tug, and I do mean slightest, my trimmers stop working and I have to walk a modest way to replug them together again. In the end they're strung together.
So I'm not sure if I recommend any inline plug and socket that comes apart unless they do so getting close to the cable breaking strength!!
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Fredxxx wrote:

I've got duraplugs on all my tools, admittedly I don't own a hedgetrimmer, but never had any interruption to power even when the cable is given a yank, a two-handed operation to separate them.
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Does that include the cordless ones?

So why do you need the duraplugs:-)?
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Adam


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On 12/05/2015 22:31, Fredxxx wrote:

IME, genuine Duraplug inline plugs are difficult to pull apart, even when you want to.
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Fredxxx wrote:

In the days when I used a hedge trimmer I twisted the leads together (like the first half of a reef knot) before connecting them. Yes I lost a few inches but it was worth it to stop it coming apart. I think it also reduced snagging.
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Mike Barnes
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When I cut through my hedge trimmer cable (a black one note!) I fitted one of these and did the same on all double insulated garden equipment and availed myself of an orange cable reel that is reserved for garden use; they never pull apart unintentionally:
http://www.diy.com/departments/bq-orange-240-v-240v-2-pin-conversion-adaptor/193485_BQ.prd
Plastic yes but the parts are up close to the appliances so never come into contact with hard surfaces and have survived considerable use ... and they are very low cost.
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writes

Just be a little wary of the 3 pin inline rubberised connectors. We had a need for 20 of these at work recently and bought most from a local DIY shop, speed was of the essence, and a couple of a different brand, although physically the same from another shop. They were marked L N E inside to aid connecting correctly. Just a pity that one manufacturer had LEN and the other manufacturer NEL. They shouldn't have gone bang if swapped over, but it wouldn't have been good! Fortunately we spotted it before it got too far.
In our case it would have caused serious problems as we were using them for 12V dc with L being positive and N being negative.
--
Bill

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Simon Cee wrote:

Similar method should work. offset the crimp joiners by a inch or so and lay in a short length of stiff wire (coathanger?)to reinforce the joint. Bind with several layers of self amalgamating tape. to insulate and seal.
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Then you can no longer coil the cable.
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On 11/05/2015 21:41, Tim Streater wrote:

Don't see why.
My *preferred* method would be to solder, with each conductor protected by sticky heat shrink, and sticky heat shrink over the top. I don't think a "stiffener" is necessary in that case. But I've done a lot of soldering and used a fair bit of heat shrink. If the OP is happy with crimping, a crimped repair with heat shrink, self amalgamating tape, or even just ordinary PVC electrical tape wound on with a fair bit of tension should make a good repair. The duraplug solution will be quicker and as others have pointed out, if the failure is near the tool this can be convenient for storage.
For that matter if the failure is within (say) a metre of the tool it is probably better to rewire the good piece into the tool, and discard the odd metre. This assumes the OP is happy to dismantle the tool; in the old days the wire would invariably terminate in normal screw connectors (like a 13A plug or socket) but these days spade connections or crimps are sometimes used. But that is really the most elegant solution if the lost metre is not a problem.
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Many thanks chaps, but...
Pardon my ignorance, but will a RCD work with a 2pin connector? Safe?
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Simon Cee wrote:

If the appliance is double insulated it will have the square-within-square icon on it, if it doesn't have the icon, it will have a 3 pin lead and you'd use the 3-pin connectors.
RCDs don't need an earth wire to work, if the amount of current going "out" the Live doesn't equal the amount coming "back" via Neutral, some has been lost and the RCD will trip.
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The RCD will work - depending on the problem.
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Adam


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On 11/05/15 21:58, Simon Cee wrote:

Yes.
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When you say in half, it really depends on whether the connector is going to be used to support the cable etc. Personally, I'd not risk such a repair. There are supposedly garden safe connectors about to lengthen cables. You pays yer money and takes your chances. Brian
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